recentpopularlog in

64-bit

« earlier   
macOS 10.15 Catalina: The Ars Technica review | Ars Technica
iPad apps come to the Mac and old 32-bit apps go away in a wide-ranging update.
Ever since the iPhone came out in 2007 and almost instantaneously overshadowed the Mac, both in terms of sales and development resources, Apple has been making the Mac a bit more like the iPhone. Sure, a few features have moved the other way—the iPad has gradually gotten a bit more Mac-like as it has become powerful enough to do Mac-like things—but a big piece of every macOS release this decade has been "here's all the stuff Apple brought over from iOS this year."
Catalina moves macOS further and more decisively in the direction of iOS than ever; for the first time, third-party code written for iOS and iPadOS can run on the Mac with relatively few changes. At the same time, Apple remains adamant that the Mac and iOS/iPadOS are separate platforms that differ in ways that go beyond the underlying processor architecture or the primary input mechanism.
Catalina also draws clearer lines between the two platforms than we've gotten before. Apple has both said and done things that only make sense if the Mac will still be able to run whatever code you want for the foreseeable future, even as the default settings and security mechanisms become more locked-down and iOS-y. The overwhelming success of the iPhone indicates that most people are fine with Apple's restrictions most of the time. But the slew of new desktop hardware we've gotten in the last couple of years suggests that Apple understands that a valuable, vocal chunk of the Mac user base (and the developers who drive the iPhone's and iPad's success) still wants powerful hardware that runs more flexible software.
Despite continued angst about what it means for apps to be "Mac-like," the Mac will continue to be the Mac, distinct from the iPhone and the iPad. Keep that in mind as we dig into Catalina, which changes a whole lot of stuff about how Macs work while still aiming to preserve what people like about them.
macOS  10.15  review  64-bit  apps  catalyst  ars_technica 
7 days ago by rgl7194
Apple ships macOS Catalina; here's what you get | Computerworld
The latest version of Apple's desktop OS is available now.
Apple today released macOS Catalina, making it available now for download.
I’ve been using it since the beta release and have written extensively in recent months about many of the new improvements and features. Here’s what you need to know:
Should I install Catalina today?
Apple’s new macOS has been extensively tested, but I don’t generally recommend any user upgrades immediately when a major OS update ships.
There are several reasons:
Some essential third-party apps may not yet have Catalina support.
Even after extensive beta testing, things do go wrong, so it is worth waiting until the first point upgrade to an OS.
You should always backup your device before you upgrade, and when you do upgrade you should have time on hand to address any problems that occur.
The update process tends to be a little smoother if you delay and avoid the rush.
When it comes to Catalina, I’m not suggesting things will go awry once you do upgrade, but in the rare event something happens, you need to make sure you have the time to address it.
macOS  10.15  review  64-bit  apps 
7 days ago by rgl7194
Apple Releases macOS Catalina With Find My, Screen Time, and No More iTunes - MacRumors
Apple today released the newest version of its operating system for Macs, macOS Catalina, to the public. macOS Catalina comes after several rounds of beta testing and months of refinements.
macOS Catalina can be downloaded from the Mac App Store for free, and it is available to anyone who has a compatible Mac.
macOS Catalina brings some major changes to the Mac, eliminating the iTunes app in favor of new Music, Podcasts, and TV apps. The three apps offer similar functionality to iTunes, but are split up by feature.
iOS device management is still available on the Mac, but it's done through the Finder instead of iTunes, and accessing your Apple ID is now done through the new profile setting in System Preferences.
macOS  10.15  review  64-bit 
7 days ago by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: Apple Releases MacOS 10.15 'Catalina'
Among the headline new features: Sidecar (using your iPad as an external, Pencil-enabled display), Find My, and the new Music, Podcasts, and TV apps that were split out of the old iTunes app. We should start seeing the first batch of third-party Catalyst (UIKit on Mac) apps in the App Store today, too. UPDATE: Here’s one from Post-It.
macOS  10.15  review  64-bit  daring_fireball  catalyst 
7 days ago by rgl7194
macOS Catalina and 64-bit
Apple on Monday released macOS Catalina, the newest operating systems for the company’s Macs. While there is a wealth of new features in the latest version, Catalina is also the first macOS to require 64-bit apps.
For those that have been following along, 64-bit is not that new. Apple has been talking to developers about the 64-bit transition for several years. Chances are your apps have already been updated to take advantage of the architecture.
However, if your apps haven’t been updated, they won’t run on the new operating system. You should be aware of that before you upgrade.
In typical Apple fashion, the company has made it easy to find out if you’ll have a problem with your apps. In your current macOS, you can go to About this Mac > System Report > Applications and get a list of all applications and whether they are 64-bit or not.
macOS  10.15  64-bit 
7 days ago by rgl7194
Daring Fireball: MacOS 10.15 Catalina and the 32-Bit App Reckoning
Jim Dalrymple, writing at The Loop:
For those that have been following along, 64-bit is not that new. Apple has been talking to developers about the 64-bit transition for several years. Chances are your apps have already been updated to take advantage of the architecture.
However, if your apps haven’t been updated, they won’t run on the new operating system. You should be aware of that before you upgrade.
In typical Apple fashion, the company has made it easy to find out if you’ll have a problem with your apps. In your current macOS, you can go to About this Mac > System Report > Applications and get a list of all applications and whether they are 64-bit or not.
If you decide not to do that and try to install macOS Catalina, the installer will post a warning that some of your apps are not compatible with the new operating system. It will also give you a list of these apps. You can decide to stop the install process and contact the developers about updates or continue, knowing those apps won’t work.
I don’t have any remaining apps of consequence that are 32-bit only, but it’s certainly worth checking before you upgrade.
macOS  10.15  64-bit  daring_fireball 
7 days ago by rgl7194
Auditing Your Mac for 32-Bit Applications and Go64 — MacSparky
It’s still not clear when we will get macOS Catalina, but it can't be far off. There are significant changes with this year's Mac update, including the fact that Catalina will no longer not support 32-bit applications. That means after you install the update, you may find some applications no longer work.
That is information you will want to have before pressing the Install button and not after. Fortunately, St. Clair Software, the same team behind DefaultFolders X, has a great app called Go64 that you can download and run today. It will give you an updated list of currently installed 32-bit applications on your Mac. I have several.
Some of these apps are old and probably not going to get updated, and others are perhaps in the process of getting their 64-bit update now. Forewarned is for armed. If you intend to update your Mac to Catalina, take a good look at your existing 32-bit applications today.
macOS  10.15  apps  64-bit  utilities 
13 days ago by rgl7194
Go64
"A fast, free way to get a comprehensive look at your 64-bit app compatibility and avoid surprises before installing macOS Catalina."
— Macworld
Check Your Apps and Prepare for a 64-bit World
Quickly scan your disk for applications, see which ones are 32-bit, and find upgrade information with the click of a button.
Go64 makes it easy to plan for the future.
And yes, it's FREE!
macOS  10.15  apps  64-bit  free  utilities 
11 weeks ago by rgl7194
How to find out if your apps will be compatible with macOS Catalina - The Verge
Catalina marks the end of 32-bit app support
Before you upgrade your Mac desktop or laptop to macOS Catalina, which will arrive later in 2019, there’s something that you should consider first: if you use 32-bit apps, they won’t work on the new macOS update. When Catalina arrives later in 2019, it will support 64-bit apps exclusively, making macOS Mojave (version 10.13) the final major version to support 32-bit apps.
Is this change guaranteed to impact you? No, especially if you mainly use Apple software. Apple wrote on a support page that it has worked to transition its own apps to 64-bit for over a decade. However, whether you rely on two apps or 200, it’s important to know which ones may be affected. Using this process, I found out that five of the hundred or so apps that I have installed will need to be updated before macOS Catalina arrives. While none of the five were important to me, the loss of a really vital app could be a deal-breaker as far as upgrading is concerned.
If you use macOS Mojave and have been using any apps that won’t be supported by the new OS, you may have seen a pop-up alert from Apple saying that the app isn’t optimized for future versions. (One will display every 30 days when you open the app.) Otherwise, you’ll have to do a little digging to see if your favorite apps make the cut. Thankfully, it’s easy to do.
macOS  10.15  apps  64-bit  utilities 
11 weeks ago by rgl7194
64-bit computing - Wikipedia
In 2003, 64-bit CPUs were introduced to the (formerly 32-bit) mainstream personal computer market in the form of x86-64 processors and the PowerPC G5, and were introduced in 2012[1] into the ARM architecture targeting smartphones and tablet computers, first sold on September 20, 2013, in the iPhone 5S powered by the ARMv8-A Apple A7 system on a chip (SoC).
cpu  64-bit  32-bit 
june 2019 by dentarg
shell - How to check OS and version using a Linux command - Unix & Linux Stack Exchange
colton@lobster:~$ uname -a
Linux lobster 4.16.0-2-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4.16.16-2 (2018-06-22) x86_64 GNU/Linux
colton@lobster:~$ lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Debian
Description: Debian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)
Release: 10
Codename: buster
debian  os  64-bit 
june 2019 by quamash
Give your old Mac software eternal life | Macworld
5/16/18 - ... So if you have old software that you’re afraid isn’t going to work in a future macOS version, fear not: You should be able to install macOS in VMWare Fusion or Parallels Desktop and keep using that app. You can even set the virtualization software to open in a full-screen space on your Mac, so you can swipe on a trackpad from High Sierra to Mavericks and back. It’s not necessarily going to be the fastest or smoothest ride—unless you’ve got a Mac with a powerful processor and a lot of RAM—but it’ll probably get the job done.
macOS_10.13  macOS_10.14  64-Bit 
may 2018 by mcbakewl

Copy this bookmark:





to read