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How Did the Blow Job Shot Happen? | PUNCH
The Citizen Kane of sexually-named cocktails arrived in 1987. National Distributing, which sold Peachtree nationwide, devised a Spring Break Contest in Fort Lauderdale with a simple charge: The bartender who could sell the most peach schnapps during the week would get a $100 bonus. At a spot called Confetti, a costume-themed dance club where confetti literally fell from the ceiling, 25-year-old Ted Pizio essentially took the red-hot Fuzzy Navel and mixed it with a Cape Cod. He called it the Sex on the Beach.

The Sex on the Beach quickly became the de facto order at the country’s growing crop of beach-themed bars. In New York magazine’s summer “Scenes” of 1987, for example, writer Daniel Shaw cites Lucy’s Surfeteria on the Upper West Side, where Columbia coeds devoured Ocean Pacific fajitas and “‘Sex on the Beach’ is not a suggestion, just a drink on the menu.” The drink went viral, and it didn’t seem to matter that most places didn’t know the original recipe. Countless sickly sweet combos would eventually claim the same name: one popular variant had vodka, Chambord, Midori, pineapple juice and cranberry juice, while another swapped in grenadine. Often, it was just served as a shot—half vodka, half Peachtree, with a splash of grenadine.

The Sex on the Beach and its cohorts soon spread from chic nightclubs in major markets to local watering holes in smaller towns, eventually becoming a critical part of chain restaurants like TGI Friday’s (where a drink called the Diddy on the Beach still persists). They also firmly rooted themselves in popular culture, proudly ordered in such hip ’80s movies as St. Elmo’s Fire and Earth Girls Are Easy (and ultimately used as a punchline by 2007’s Shrek the Third and 2009’s I Love You Man).
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yesterday by will.brien
How many fitness lives do we get? – FIT IS A FEMINIST ISSUE
I ran the Boston Marathon 18 years ago. Last Monday, as news of the freezing wet head-wind-y icestorm marathon filtered in, the only reaction I had was “there is nothing on this earth that could have got me to the start line on a morning like that.” And then a moment of honesty — “I’m not sure there’s anything on earth that could get me to the start line of a marathon on any morning.”

But look at this 35 year old person in the middle of this photo — that was mile 18, and I had a damaged knee, and I look so CHEERFUL.
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yesterday by will.brien
The Trouble with Foul Trouble – Cleaning the Glass
All told, then, Oladipo played only eight first half minutes. He’d play 20 in the second half without picking up another foul. In a game the Pacers lost by 3, losing 10 minutes of playing time from their best player could easily be said to have been the difference. And many did say that, criticizing McMillan’s handling of Oladipo’s minutes and laying the loss at the Pacers’ coach’s feet.

It wouldn’t take long for McMillan to face this same situation again. On the first possession of Game 3, Bojan Bogdanovic was whistled for a foul while wrestling with LeBron. And three-and-a-half minutes later he picked up a second for a bump on George Hill. Another Pacer with two fouls in the first quarter, another pulled prematurely as McMillan once again followed the classic foul trouble rule. All of which triggered Jeff Van Gundy, broadcasting the game, to wonder aloud: “What is foul trouble?”

And then he put up the Bat-Signal: “I need one of those really smart sites like Cleaning the Glass to say: is it good strategy to take guys out at two fouls, or three fouls, or four in the second half?”
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2 days ago by will.brien
The End of the Joint As We Know It - The Ringer
As smoking accessories have modernized in the past 10 years, and as more states have legalized sales, grinding and rolling up bud has gradually become a more obscure ritual. And the era of the hastily rolled marijuana cigarette — crystallized by everyone from Cheech and Chong to Barack Obama — is slowly coming to a close. “If you fast-forward 10 years and look back at the cannabis market, I’ll take a guess that in some ways we’ll think about consuming cannabis flower like we think about consuming a cigar now,” said Alan Gertner, the CEO of Hiku, a Canadian cannabis producer and retailer that aims to make pot consumption more mainstream. “It’s a ritual, it’s a heritage moment, it’s about celebration. But ultimately cannabis flower for any individual is somewhat hard to interact with. The idea that a 20-year-old is going to learn to roll a joint is sort of ludicrous.”
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2 days ago by will.brien
Why Boards of Canada’s Music Has the Right to Children Is the Greatest Psychedelic Album of the ’90s | Pitchfork
Where most of the first wave of British IDM artists started out making banging techno and shrieking acid for the hardcore ravefloor, BoC’s trajectory was more like Seefeel, a guitar band that passed through post-rock into abstract electronica, or Ultramarine, which evolved out of the second-wave industrial outfit A Primary Industry. “Our angle coming into electronic music in the late ’80s was more from experimental alternative stuff,” recalls Eoin. “All these artists had some sort of agenda. But when dance music took over in the ’90s it just seemed really disposable to us. We’ve never had much interest in techno or dance music.” In the interviews around Music Has the Right, the brothers candidly indicated that making people move was not a priority: “If you can dance to one of our tracks, well and good, but it’s not what we’re aiming at.”
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2 days ago by will.brien
The last days of Juventus?
My plane will be in the air by the time you read this, leaving behind flashes from a strange Torino dream. It's not an original idea, but it's true: If you want to learn about how the Romans lived in the past, go to Rome; if you want to learn how the Medici lived in the past, go to Florence; if you want to see how Italians live today, the joys and struggles of life in color and in present tense -- go to Torino. I came here to see Juventus while this team was still together, fighting for a championship with the great Buffon in goal. Get on a plane right now if you can because time is running out. Most likely, only a month remains. The Juventus team motto has never seemed more appropriate: Fino Alla Fine. Until the bitter end.
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2 days ago by will.brien
The Bottled Water Obsession Taking over NBA Locker Rooms | Bleacher Report | Latest News, Videos and Highlights
The NBA isn’t alone in this obsession. For the first time in American history, sales of bottled water exceeded those of carbonated soft drinks in 2016. And that gap widened in 2017. Americans also drank nine billion gallons of bottled water last year, according to the Beverage Marketing Corporation. (That seismic shift in the market recently caught the eye of LaVar Ball, who is now selling Big Baller Brand bottled water from Lithuania.)

So what’s behind the water craze? Is alkaline water just a marketing gimmick? Or maybe the real performance benefit is all in your head. Step inside the water wars of the bigger, faster, thirstier NBA.
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2 days ago by will.brien
However improbable: The story of a processor bug
There was no obvious pattern to the servers which produced these mystery core dumps. We were getting about one a day on average across our fleet of servers. So the sample size was not very big, but they seemed to be evenly spread across all our servers and datacenters, and no one server was struck twice. The probability that an individual server would get a mystery core dump seemed to be very low (about one per ten years of server uptime, assuming they were indeed equally likely for all our servers). But because of our large number of servers, we got a steady trickle.
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2 days ago by will.brien
Introducing: A Tracker Where You Can Check How Your Councillors Have Voted – Dublin Inquirer
We plan to keep adding votes to this website, once the council sends us vote sheets after each major council meeting. If you’d like to get involved, we’ve a Facebook group going to coordinate and you’re welcome.

We’re also working on improving the site, and we’re open to suggestions. You can take a look at our to-do list, but if you’ve got other ideas, do get in touch.

Please bear in mind we are a really small team, so we’ll do our best to get back to you, but we might not always be as fast as we’d like.
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7 days ago by will.brien
Lakers' Rebuild Could Be Ready for Showtime | SI.com
During a nine-game midwinter losing streak, when Ball’s shot was clanking and his father was chirping, he and Kuzma talked about Oklahoma City. “Remember when KD and Russ were young, and they were 3–29,” Kuzma said of Durant and Westbrook. “This happens.” The Lakers are the rare club following the OKC model and the Miami model at the same time, developing their nucleus while dangling their cap space. “That’s the beauty of it,” Pelinka says. “Whatever the road becomes—Is it two max guys this summer? Is it one this summer and one the next? Is it splitting up the space and just growing this young core?—it’s a good road to be on.”
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8 days ago by will.brien
Cannabis is fueling one of the best runners in America | Sports in the age of cannabis
What he believes is that cannabis is a safer alternative to hard drugs and alcohol. He’s also found that it helps with pain mitigation. What it really comes down to is he likes getting high and he likes running. It seemed only natural to combine the two.

Collins is a proponent of what he calls “responsible consumption”, and he’s found an acceptable level to enhance the experience. Sometimes he smokes a little and other times he takes an edible about 30 minutes before a run, but what works for him may not work for someone else.

My experience is way more limited — I’ve never run on an edible — but we both agree that a nice little head high is enough to get things flowing in the right direction. Hence the solitary hit at the beginning of our journey. What he’s found is similar to what I’ve found, that cannabis makes him a more mindful runner. That includes managing the aches that are intrinsic to his workload.

“One day you can go out and feel every single twinge, which may not be a bad thing,” Collins says. “I’ll take the downhills a little easier, try to switch my muscle groups on the uphill a little bit more. The benefit of being high is you’re more in tune with your body. It keeps you more alert and aware.”
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8 days ago by will.brien
Caddyshack book excerpt: Details of Bill Murray-Chevy Chase scene | SI.com
By October, midway through production, Ramis had been worrying for days: Had anyone heard from Bill? It was simply the cost of doing business with such a magnificent flake as Murray. And Ramis had known that this was a possibility going in. Murray brought an exciting air of imminent mischief wherever he went, regardless of when he arrived. He was a once-in-a-generation kind of talent to whom the rules simply didn’t seem to apply. But still, where the hell was he?

Finally, shooting one day on a fairway, the crew noticed something coming around a bunker. Ramis could finally breathe. As a golf cart pulled up with the MIA star, Murray leaned out and announced, “Which way to the youth hostel?” Ramis and Murray hugged and slapped backs. Bill was excited to catch up with his brother Brian and with Kenney. But that would have to wait. Ramis had Murray for only six short days.

Murray’s first scene was his Dalai Lama monologue. Early on in the screenwriting process, his character, Carl Spackler, hadn’t even existed in the script. Now they needed to create him out of whole cloth on the spot. And that—a situation where almost nothing is defined—was the stage on which Murray thrived. He’d had a chance to let Carl marinate in his head during his cross-country drive from L.A. to Florida (in a VW Super Beetle borrowed from SNL producer Lorne Michaels, no less). He arrived fully committed to a handful of half-baked ideas. None of which he shared with his director before cameras rolled.
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8 days ago by will.brien
Securing DNS across all of my devices with Pi-Hole + DNS-over-HTTPS + 1.1.1.1
If everything is all setup and running just fine the last step is to make sure cloudflared is always running. To do this we will create a systemd unit file to make sure of that.
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9 days ago by will.brien
James Harden Isn't Playing Around | GQ
Harden isn't that tall, he doesn't jump very high, and he isn't crazy fast. But there is one very particular, newly quantifiable skill at which he is the best in the NBA: deceleration. P3, an athletic-performance firm based in Santa Barbara, California, actually studied this, and that was its conclusion. At a moment when everyone in the league is trying to go faster, Harden is the best at slowing down. "No—stopping," he clarifies. "That's why it's so hard to guard me—because I'm able to get you off-balance, use my body, then stop on a dime and still get my shot. That's tough, you know?"
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9 days ago by will.brien
Best practices for securing administrative access in Azure AD | Microsoft Docs
The security of most or all business assets in the modern organization depends on the integrity of the privileged accounts that administer and manage IT systems. Malicious actors including cyber-attackers often target admin accounts and other elements of privileged access to attempt to rapidly gain access to sensitive data and systems using credential theft attacks. For cloud services, prevention and response are the joint responsibilities of the cloud service provider and the customer. For more information about the latest threats to endpoints and the cloud, see the Microsoft Security Intelligence Report. This article can help you develop a roadmap toward closing the gaps between your current plans and the guidance described here.
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9 days ago by will.brien
What Will Become of Sports Illustrated? - The Ringer
There are still terrific writers at Sports Illustrated. The best-known among them—Peter King in football, Tom Verducci in baseball, Grant Wahl in soccer—are arguably the nation’s foremost authorities on their respective sports. Each has used SI as a platform to expand their profile to TV, and those TV appearances have in turn helped keep SI visible in the modern media age.

Beyond King, Verducci, and Wahl, there remains a deep roster of talent—Lee Jenkins, whose NBA writing is superb (check out his recent profile on Raptors coach Dwane Casey); the venerable S.L. Price, modern master of the takeout piece; the erudite generalist Tim Layden; and the talented young Ben Reiter, whose prophetic 2014 cover story on the Astros’ rebuilding process (“Your 2017 World Series Champs”) turned out to be the most-discussed SI cover of 2017, thanks to the Astros’ title run. There’s not a great deal of diversity on the staff—“It’s a lot of white dudes,” admitted one writer—and it’s also true that since so many of the writers have a clean, unshowy style, the voices at SI are less identifiable than they once were.

There are some exceptions, including the talented polemicist Charles Pierce, now on contract, and longtime staffer Steve Rushin, who still contributes occasionally. But today, if you drew up a list of the most distinctive writers in sports, it is not a coincidence that so few of those voices are in Sports Illustrated.
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9 days ago by will.brien
Starship Stormtroopers: Michael Moorcock
Starship Troopers (serialised in Astounding as was most of Heinlein's fiction until the early sixties) was probably Heinlein's last 'straight' sf serial for Campbell before he began his 'serious' books such as Farnham's Freehold and Stranger in a Strange Land -- taking the simplified characters of genre fiction and producing some of the most ludicrously unlikely people ever to appear in print. In Starship Troopers we find a slightly rebellious cadet gradually learning that wars are inevitable, that the army is always right, that his duty is to obey the rules and protect the human race against the alien menace. It is pure debased Ford out of Kipling and it set the pattern for Heinlein's more ambitious paternalistic, xenophobic (but equally sentimental) stories which became for me steadily more hilarious until I realised with some surprise that people were taking them as seriously as they had taken, say, Atlas Shrugged a generation before -- in hundreds of thousands! That middle-America could regard such stuff as 'radical' was easy enough to understand. I kept finding that supporters of the Angry Brigade were enthusiastic about Heinlein, that people with whom I thought I shared libertarian principles were getting off on every paternalistic, bourgeois writer who had ever given me the creeps! I still can't fully understand it. Certainly I can't doubt the sincerity of their idealism. But how does it equate with their celebration of writers like Tolkein and Heinlein? The clue could be in the very vagueness of the prose, which allows for liberal interpretation; it could be that the ciphers they use instead of characters are capable of suggesting a wholly different meaning to certain readers. To me, their naive and emblematic reading of society is fundamentally misanthropic and therefore anti-libertarian. We are faced, once again, with quasi-religion, presented to us as radicalism. At best it is the philosophy of the Western applied to the complex social problems of the twentieth century -- it is Reaganism, it is John Wayne in Big John Maclean and The Green Berets, it is George Wallace and Joe McCarthy -- at its most refined it is William F. Buckley Jr., who, already a long way more sophisticated than Heinlein, is still pretty simple-minded.

Rugged individualism also goes hand in hand with a strong faith in paternalism -- albeit a tolerant and somewhat distant paternalism -- and many otherwise sharp-witted libertarians seem to see nothing in the morality of a John Wayne Western to conflict with their views. Heinlein's paternalism is at heart the same as Wayne's. In the final analysis it is a kind of easy-going militarism favoured by the veteran professional soldier -- the chain of command is complex -- many adult responsibilities can be left to that chain as long as broad, but firmly enforced, rules from 'high up' are adhered to. Heinlein is Eisenhower Man and his views seem to me to be more pernicious than ordinary infantile back-to-the-land Christian communism, with its mysticism and its hatred of technology. To be an anarchist, surely, is to reject authority but to accept self-discipline and community responsibility. To be a rugged individualist a la Heinlein and others is to be forever a child who must obey, charm and cajole to be tolerated by some benign, omniscient father: Rooster Coburn shuffling his feet in front of a judge he respects for his office (but not necessarily himself) in True Grit.
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9 days ago by will.brien

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