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Bach at the Burger King - Los Angeles Review of Books
Where does this leave the prelude — and, by extension, classical music? From awakening Megasharks to selling Cadillacs, Bach’s Prelude to Cello Suite No. 1 has been drafted to support many causes. But one cause it seldom supports is itself. After being pressed into the service of so many outside agendas — advertising, film, and police work — the prelude loses its identity as an independent work of art, demanding to be taken on its own terms. It is difficult for the prelude to provide any modern audience with a genuinely “pure” listening experience. This erosion is a now-common fate for popular art. Secondary associations gradually smother primary experiences. No matter how strong an individual piece, over time, Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and Market Street threaten to drain the vitality of even the greatest music until there’s nothing left. The coroner’s report: Death by quotation. After all, there are only so many times a melody can be used to harass the homeless, embellish a cannibal’s cookery, or promote the dignity of dog food before we forget it could also glorify the dignity of humanity.
music  classicalmusic  gentrification  commercialisation  review  critique  LAReviewofBooks  2018 
29 days ago by inspiral
10 Treasures, Unearthed From the New York Philharmonic’s Archives - The New York Times
I don’t know of another historical document like music, that is fixed on the printed page but then is transformed by the interpreting artist again and again. My favorite is the score of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony, dramatically marked by Gustav Mahler in 1909. In 1929, Arturo Toscanini, reviewing the score, was indignant at the Mahler revisions and expressed his disapproval by writing on the score that his predecessor’s changes were “unworthy of such a musician.”

These NY Phil archives!
music  classicalmusic  archives  history 
8 weeks ago by madamim
Twitter
RT : This beautiful Chanot looks really modern but it’s from 1818, when Beethoven was 48 🎶

ClassicalMusic  cello  from twitter_favs
february 2018 by pollo
Twitter
This beautiful Chanot looks really modern but it’s from 1818, when Beethoven was 48 🎶

ClassicalMusic  cello  from twitter_favs
february 2018 by fourstar
Twitter
what a discovery! -- a streaming service for that actually works & doesn't jumble…
ClassicalMusic  from twitter_favs
january 2018 by bas

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