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Robert Mueller’s team says it will be very busy in the coming days
Special counsel Robert Mueller’s office asked a court for an 11-day extension on a filing deadline Tuesday — claiming that, for the time being, key attorneys on their team were too busy with “the press of other work.”

The reference immediately raised eyebrows among close watchers of the special counsel’s work — because there are no known important deadlines in Mueller cases coming up. So what, then, is Mueller’s team so busy with at the moment?

For months now, rumors have been rampant that Mueller’s final report and the conclusion of his work are imminent. Some top attorneys on his team are leaving, and his top FBI agent has already left. All the specific predictions about when, exactly, the report would be done have turned out to be wrong so far, but all things must come to an end eventually.

Now, Tuesday’s request comes in response to a request by the Washington Post to unseal certain materials related to former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort. The deadline for Mueller’s team to respond was supposed to be this Thursday, March 21 — but they’ve asked it be extended to April 1. Here’s the key paragraph:
RobertMueller  politics  fbi  legal  crime  scandal 
yesterday by jtyost2
College Admissions Scandal: FBI Targets Wealthy Parents - The Atlantic
His comment highlighted the mundanity of admissions favors for upper-crust children—when executed legally. Sometimes these favors are given through a practice known as “legacy admissions,” in which elite colleges give preference to an applicant who, say, is the child of an alumnus. A common denominator tends to be wealth, particularly if the applicant is otherwise underqualified. A parent may offer a college a handsome donation (and, sometimes, a namesake building) to boost her child’s admissions prospects.
college  crime  fbi  academia 
3 days ago by craniac
House Votes, 420-to-0, to Demand Public Release of Mueller Report
House Republicans joined Democrats on Thursday to overwhelmingly demand the Department of Justice release to Congress and the public the full findings of the special counsel’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and the possible involvement of President Trump’s campaign.

Though the resolution is nonbinding and cannot force the Justice Department to take an particular action, Democrats who put it on the House floor are trying to build public pressure on Attorney General William P. Barr in advance of the investigation’s anticipated conclusion to share what Robert S. Mueller III produces. Far from standing in the way, Republicans joined Democrats en masse. On the 420-0 vote, four Republicans voted present.

“This report must see the light of day, must be available to the American public for a catharsis that will allow us to start with the facts, understand what happened and begin to rebuild the faith of the American people,” said Representative Jim Himes, Democrat of Connecticut and a senior member of the Intelligence Committee, which has undertaken its own Russia investigation.

Republicans called the resolution a waste of time, but they were unwilling to stand in its way. The four “present” votes were two libertarians who routinely oppose such resolutions, Representatives Justin Amash of Michigan and Thomas Massie of Kentucky, and two ardent Trump loyalists, Representatives Matt Gaetz of Florida and Paul Gosar of Arizona.
usa  congress  RobertMueller  politics  legal  DonaldTrump  fbi  republicans  democrats  ethics  scandal  russia 
5 days ago by jtyost2
Twitter
Hedy Lamarr’s files make no mention of her “Secret Communication System”
FBI  from twitter_favs
5 days ago by thomasj
The Real College Admissions Bribery Scandal Is What’s Legal
But my competitive application was underwritten by my professional-class parents’ wealth. My SAT scores were the product of hours of tutoring, and my writing skills were honed in pricey summer classes, which most American families cannot afford. And before all that, my parents’ economic security enabled them to buy a home in a suburb with a coveted school system that featured better-qualified teachers and smaller class sizes than most working-class kids are provided. I did not earn these advantages. My parents purchased them for me.
And in this respect, I am not atypical. In America, a student’s household income strongly correlates with her educational attainment. Meanwhile, social mobility is much lower in the United States than in Europe — and has been steadily declining in recent decades. A 2014 study by economists at Harvard and Berkeley found fewer than 10 percent of those born into the bottom fifth of wealth distribution make it into the top fifth. The middle class fared only slightly better — roughly 20 percent of those born into the middle fifth reached the top fifth by the end of their lives. America’s class hierarchy is rigid. And it’s kept that way, in no small part, by an education system that allows the “haves” to buy their children seats in the best-funded public schools, test-gaming lessons with the finest tutors, and all manner of privately provided extracurricular enrichment.
actress  college  crime  FBI  fraud  money  parenting  scam  class  admissions 
6 days ago by rgl7194
Marketing guru Jane Buckingham caught up in college admissions scandal - Los Angeles Times
For years, Hollywood turned to marketing guru Jane Buckingham to find out what kids really want, drawing on her extensive expertise on the youth zeitgeist. She once charged $2,500 a head to attend her Trend School, a seminar focusing on the consumption habits of Generations X and Y.
But Buckingham, 50, now faces federal charges that she was involved in the widespread college admissions scheme that has ensnared Hollywood celebrities and shined a light on how wealthy parents allegedly paid bribes to give their children an advantage in the competitive process.
Buckingham, who once authored a book titled “The Modern Girl’s Guide to Sticky Situations,” wanted desperately for her son to attend USC. So the Los Angeles marketing maven — once called the Martha Stewart of the younger generation — turned to William Singer, a college admissions advisor, to help her son score high on the ACT standardized test, prosecutors alleged.
Together, they allegedly arranged for Buckingham to make a $50,000 donation to a charitable organization in exchange for someone to take the test in place of her son, according to charges filed by Department of Justice officials on Tuesday.
The substitute test taker scored a 35 for the son — in the 99th percentile.
college  crime  FBI  fraud  money  parenting  scam  marketing  celebrity  latimes  admissions 
6 days ago by rgl7194
The College-Bribe Scandal Is About Class Inequality - The Atlantic
Family life itself has become part of the battleground of the classes.
You are shocked—shocked—I know. According to the FBI, a network of 33 wealthy parents engaged in a massive fraud to buy places for their children at elite colleges. Didn’t they realize that there are many perfectly legal ways to do that?
You can hire a legitimate college counselor for $10,000 and up. You can get test prep for anything from $120 to $375 an hour. You can buy personal coaches, fencing equipment, and squash-club memberships, often for less than the price of a Sub-Zero refrigerator. You can arrange for unpaid internships that will allow Junior to shine as a true humanitarian. You can game your way into a great private school—it’s so much easier to play the angles in kindergarten or sixth grade than in college admissions. If all else fails, you can just make a big donation to the school of your choice.
Have the rich gotten dumber? Or are they getting cheaper? Actually, the affidavit suggests that there are two deeply connected structural problems. The first is that the price of admission has gone up. The second is that the moral center of the meritocracy has collapsed.
actress  college  crime  FBI  fraud  money  parenting  scam  class  admissions 
6 days ago by rgl7194
How the largest college admissions scandal ever let wealthy parents cheat the system - Los Angeles Times
When it came to getting their daughters into college, actress Lori Loughlin and fashion designer J. Mossimo Giannulli were taking no chances.
The wealthy, glamorous couple were determined their girls would attend USC, a highly competitive school that offers seats only to a fraction of the thousands of students who apply each year.
So they turned to William Singer and the “side door” the Newport Beach businessman said he had built into USC and other highly sought after universities. Half a million dollars later — $400,000 of it sent to Singer and $100,000 to an administrator in USC’s vaunted athletic program — the girls were enrolled at the school. Despite having never competed in crew, both had been given coveted slots reserved for rowers who were expected to join the school’s team.
“This is wonderful news!” Loughlin emailed Singer after receiving word that a spot for her second daughter had been secured. She added a high-five emoji.
According to a sweeping criminal investigation into fraudulent college admissions unveiled Tuesday, Loughlin and Giannulli are one of at least dozens of families who paid huge sums to take advantage of Singer’s audacious scheme to gain access to exclusive schools through bribes and lies.
Federal investigators said they have charged 50 people in the case, including the USC administrator who helped Loughlin’s kids, and accomplices whom Singer allegedly paid to rig college admission test scores — as well as coaches at USC, UCLA, Stanford and Yale.
actress  college  crime  FBI  fraud  money  parenting  scam  latimes  admissions 
6 days ago by rgl7194
Will children at center of college admissions scandal pay a price along with their parents? - Los Angeles Times
Their parents face criminal charges, with federal prosecutors alleging massive fraud to get them into some of America’s most elite schools.
But it’s still unclear what is going to happen to the children who were the beneficiaries of what prosecutors called the largest college admissions scam ever uncovered.
Federal prosecutors allege cheating on standardized tests, bribery and faking athletic achievements to get into college — the types of misdeeds that would lead to serious discipline. But in many cases, they said, the students did not know about the arrangements their parents made.
Administrators at UCLA and USC said this week they are reviewing student admission decisions after discovering that dozens of families paid huge sums to gain access to at least eight exclusive schools, including theirs, through bribes and lies. Among the parents charged were Hollywood actresses Felicity Huffman, of “Desperate Housewives,” and Lori Loughlin, of “Full House.”
A USC spokesman said Wednesday that students who applied for admission in the current cycle — which is underway for fall admits — and are tied to the scheme will be denied admission. That includes about half a dozen applicants.
The school will also conduct a case-by-case review for current students and graduates who may have taken part in the scheme.
“We will make informed, appropriate decisions once those reviews have been completed,” USC spokesman Eddie North-Hager said in a statement.
actress  college  crime  FBI  fraud  money  parenting  scam  latimes  admissions 
6 days ago by rgl7194
Who’s Been Charged in the College Admissions Cheating Scandal? Here’s the Full List - The New York Times
The actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin and the fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli are among the 50 people charged in a bribery scheme to secure places for students in elite colleges.
In what the Justice Department called its largest ever college admissions prosecution, federal authorities charged 50 people on Tuesday with taking part in a nationwide scheme to game the admissions process at highly competitive schools like Yale and the University of Southern California.
[The college admissions scandal has raised a lot of questions. We’ve answered them here.]
Those charged include wealthy and powerful parents accused of paying millions of dollars in bribes, exam administrators and athletic coaches accused of manufacturing students’ achievements, and private admissions counselors accused of coordinating it all.
actress  college  crime  FBI  fraud  money  parenting  scam  nytimes  admissions 
6 days ago by rgl7194
Here's How A Life Coach Scammed The College Admissions System For Wealthy Families
Rick Singer pleaded guilty on Tuesday to racketeering, money laundering, conspiracy to commit fraud, and obstruction of justice.
A high school student might get into a top university based on their test scores and abilities. Or maybe their parents' hefty donation could cause an admissions officer to take a second look.
But for families looking for a sure thing, 58-year-old Rick Singer offered a criminal solution. Over seven years, the entrepreneurial life coach took an estimated $25 million from anxious parents, recording much of it as tax-deductible donations to his charity while actually funneling it toward bribes, authorities say.
The kids got in. Parents sang his praises. And on Tuesday, federal prosecutors revealed what had become a nationwide conspiracy. Fifty people, including TV stars like Full House actor Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman of Desperate Housewives, as well as university coaches, were accused of crimes related to the scheme. Singer pleaded guilty to racketeering, money laundering, conspiracy to commit fraud, and obstruction of justice. Court documents revealed that he cooperated with the investigation once confronted by the FBI in hopes of getting a lighter sentence.
actress  college  crime  FBI  fraud  money  parenting  scam  admissions 
6 days ago by rgl7194
The House just passed a resolution to make Robert Mueller’s report public
Special counsel Robert Mueller is expected to submit his long-awaited report on the Trump-Russia investigation to the Department of Justice soon. And House Democrats really, really want it to be made public.

In a rare bipartisan vote, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a nonbinding resolution Thursday to do just that. Republicans joined Democrats in a 420-0 vote to approve the resolution, with just four lawmakers declining to take a stance by voting ‘present.’

It’s unclear whether Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will pick it up. He blocked a similar bipartisan bill from Sens. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) from the Senate floor earlier this year.

The House, on the other hand, is intent on passing a resolution to make the report public because they’re not sure how much recourse they’ll otherwise have if the Justice Department decides to keep Mueller’s report under wraps.
HouseOfRepresentatives  congress  politics  DeptOfJustice  RobertMueller  fbi  legal  scandal  DonaldTrump  russia  from instapaper
6 days ago by jtyost2
House Votes, 420-to-0, to Demand Public Release of Mueller Report - The New York Times
WASHINGTON — House Republicans joined Democrats on Thursday to demand that the Justice Department publicly release the full findings of the special counsel’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and the possible involvement of President Trump’s campaign.
Though the resolution is nonbinding, Democrats who put it on the House floor are trying to build public pressure on Attorney General William P. Barr before the investigation’s anticipated conclusion.
Far from standing in the way, Republicans joined Democrats en masse. On the 420-to-0 vote, four Republicans voted present.
“This report must see the light of day, must be available to the American public for a catharsis that will allow us to start with the facts, understand what happened and begin to rebuild the faith of the American people,” said Representative Jim Himes, Democrat of Connecticut and a senior member of the Intelligence Committee, which has undertaken its own Russia investigation.
conspiracy  crime  DOJ  FBI  gov2.0  legal  mueller  politics  russia  special_counsel  trump  congress  report  nytimes 
6 days ago by rgl7194
House calls for public release of Robert Mueller's final report in 420-0 vote
The House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday to demand that special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election be made public when his work is complete.

By a vote of 420-0, the House passed a nonbinding resolution Thursday urging for the public release of "any report" Mueller provides to Attorney General William Barr, except the portions "expressly prohibited by law." And they insisted that Congress should receive the whole thing.

The vote comes amid signs that Mueller's inquiry could be drawing closer to its conclusion. Mueller's office confirmed on Thursday that one of its top prosecutors, Andrew Weissmann, plans to leave for another job soon, the latest in a series of departures from the office.

Justice Department rules require Mueller to submit a final, confidential report to Barr outlining why he charged some people and not others. Barr has said he wants to release as much detail as possible about the results of the special counsel investigation, but has not committed to releasing all of the findings of an investigation that has been based in part on classified intelligence and secret grand jury information.

The nearly two-year investigation dug deeply into President Donald Trump's presidential campaign, his administration and their Russian ties.

The president has repeatedly derided the probe as a "witch hunt" and often claims there was no collusion between his campaign and Russia.

Mueller has indicted 34 people, including Russian intelligence operatives and some of Trump's closest aides and advisers. In doing so, he revealed a wealth of details about a sophisticated Russian effort to influence the 2016 election and about a campaign eager to reap the benefits of that activity. What he might add in a final report remains uncertain.

Rep. Steve Scalise, R-Louisiana, said the end of Mueller's investigation is "long overdue" and that he must be transparent with the public.
RobertMueller  fbi  legal  government  russia  DonaldTrump  congress  HouseOfRepresentatives  from instapaper
6 days ago by jtyost2
Mueller gently taps Judge Berman Jackson on the shoulder re: Manafort sentencing
Please forgive me if someone else has diaried this, but I got a smile out of this item today:
Robert Mueller Not-So-Subtly Nudges D.C. Judge to Throw the Book at Paul Manafort
Heh.
In an “I’m-just-gonna-leave-this-here” move, Mueller’s prosecutors Andrew Weissmann, Jeannie Rhee, and Greg Andres filed a one-paragraph status report with D.C. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson, saying:
“The United States of America, by and through Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller, III, files this status report to apprise the Court of a recent development in United States v. Paul J. Manafort, Jr., No. 1:18-cr-83 (E.D. Va.) that is pertinent to this Court’s upcoming sentencing decision. Attached to this status report as Exhibit A is the transcript from the sentencing hearing on March 7, 2019.”
Mueller’s team then attaches the 96-page transcript of Manafort’s sentencing hearing, where Judge T.S. Ellis III went far below the sentencing guidelines, giving Manafort a punishment of just 47 months for his tax and bank fraud case.
This should be fun.
conspiracy  crime  DOJ  FBI  gov2.0  legal  mueller  politics  russia  special_counsel  trump 
7 days ago by rgl7194
Felicity Huffman among dozens charged over admissions fraud at top US schools | US news | The Guardian
Massive fraud in which many CEOs, government officials, actors & other elites bought their offsprings’ places into Ivy League schools
college  university  fraud  usa  ivy  league  elite  FBI  investigation  sport  bribe  entrance  exam  Q1  2019  scandal 
7 days ago by csrollyson
The Origins of Paul Manafort, Trump's Former Campaign Manager - The Atlantic
Decades before he ran the Trump campaign, Paul Manafort’s pursuit of foreign cash and shady deals laid the groundwork for the corruption of Washington.
I. The Wisdom of Friends
the clinic permitted paul manafort one 10-minute call each day. And each day, he would use it to ring his wife from Arizona, his voice often soaked in tears. “Apparently he sobs daily,” his daughter Andrea, then 29, texted a friend. During the spring of 2015, Manafort’s life had tipped into a deep trough. A few months earlier, he had intimated to his other daughter, Jessica, that suicide was a possibility. He would “be gone forever,” she texted Andrea.
His work, the source of the status he cherished, had taken a devastating turn. For nearly a decade, he had counted primarily on a single client, albeit an exceedingly lucrative one. He’d been the chief political strategist to the man who became the president of Ukraine, Viktor Yanukovych, with whom he’d developed a highly personal relationship. Manafort would swim naked with his boss outside his banya, play tennis with him at his palace (“Of course, I let him win,” Manafort made it known), and generally serve as an arbiter of power in a vast country. One of his deputies, Rick Gates, once boasted to a group of Washington lobbyists, “You have to understand, we’ve been working in Ukraine a long time, and Paul has a whole separate shadow government structure … In every ministry, he has a guy.” Only a small handful of Americans—oil executives, Cold War spymasters—could claim to have ever amassed such influence in a foreign regime. The power had helped fill Manafort’s bank accounts; according to his recent indictment, he had tens of millions of dollars stashed in havens like Cyprus and the Grenadines.
conspiracy  crime  DOJ  FBI  gov2.0  legal  mueller  politics  russia  special_counsel  trump 
8 days ago by rgl7194

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