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The Danger Of Valuing Men's Careers Over Women's Lives | HuffPost
When men’s careers are valued over women’s lives, dangerous men are free to find even more people to prey on without consequence, as a recent long-form story on former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar from New York magazine’s The Cut so eloquently reveals.

One of Nassar’s first victims, Larissa Boyce, tried to sound the alarm about his behavior. She told her coach that Nassar was touching her inappropriately, under the guise of medical treatment. Her coach dismissed her concerns, telling her she just didn’t understand what he was doing. If she went forward with her allegations, she said, it would have serious consequences.

Not just for her but for Nassar.

The insinuation was obvious: Did she really want to be the one who derailed his career? Boyce, only 16 years old, let it go. Now more than 20 years later, nearly 500 women have come forward with similar stories.

It is chilling to imagine what might have happened if Boyce had been taken seriously back then, her teenage complaint deemed as important as Nassar’s reputation.
sexism  misogyny  sexual_assault  consequences 
20 days ago by Quercki
6 Mistakes We Make Raising Sons - Kids Books To Prevent Sexual Assault - Books For Littles
Parents of sons, we need to talk

Look around at all those little girls in your son’s school playground. Those girls whose names you know, who go to school with your boys. The fierce ones, the shy ones, the messy ones, and that one with her shoes on the wrong feet.
Every single one of those girls will be sexually assaulted or harassed before she’s 20.

Every. Single. One.

RAINN’s 1 in 6 women experiencing ‘rape or attempted rape’ statistic doesn’t count unreported assaults. Nor does it count slaps on the ass while waitressing. It doesn’t include being followed home on a dark night. It doesn’t include the lovers and friends shaming them into sex they don’t want. It doesn’t include rape threats for being a female gamer/writer/zookeeper/anything.

This doesn’t count the 1 in 33 men and boys who report sexual assault, and the many more who don’t feel safe enough to do so.

This is our normal. This is the rape culture we perpetuate when we let toxic masculinity become someone else’s problem.

This is our responsibility to change. Learn to identify the mistakes we make as parents – and how to change what we expect from our boys.
children  books  solution  toxic  masculinity  sexual_assault  todo 
6 weeks ago by Quercki
Christine Blasey Ford, Brett Kavanaugh forcing sexual assault reckoning
Kirsten Powers, Opinion columnist Published 4:00 a.m. ET Oct. 2, 2018
sexual_assault  '80s  women 
9 weeks ago by jerryking
No prison time for ex-Houston doctor who raped heavily sedated patient
A former Texas doctor who raped a heavily sedated patient won't serve prison time after he was found guilty of the crime Thursday.

Shafeeq Sheikh, a former Baylor College of Medicine physician, was sentenced to 10 years' probation Friday, and he must now register as a sex offender.

Jurors recommended the sentencing, which visiting Senior District Judge Terry L. Flenniken was required to follow by law, according to the Houston Chronicle.

In 2013, a woman, identified in local media as Laura, checked into Ben Taub Hospital in Houston. She was being treated for shortness of breath and wheezing; she was kept overnight and sedated.

Police said Dr. Shafeeq Sheikh went into her room several times through the night and sexually assaulted her.
sexual_assault  news  rape 
10 weeks ago by Quercki
Tarana Burke Reflects on #MeToo’s Resurgence One Year Later – Variety
All of the shouting and headlines about who #MeToo is going to take down next creates a kind of careless perception that invalidates the experiences of survivors who risk everything coming forward, whether it’s telling their stories, sharing a hashtag or being transparent and vulnerable about some of the worst things that have happened in their lives.

The din of naysayers has, in many regards, severely overshadowed the beauty of what has happened this year. It has been a year of great liberation and empowerment. Every day I meet people who have moved from victim to survivor by simply adding their own “Me too” to the chorus of voices. They have freed themselves from the burden that holding on to these traumas often creates and stepped into the power of release, the power of empathy and the power of truth. They have looked their demons in the face and lived to see another day, and they have become the empirical proof that we can win the fight to end sexual violence.

Moving into 2019, some concrete things must happen in order to build on the momentum we have gained in the last year, starting with changing how we talk about the #MeToo movement. This is a survivors’ movement created for and by those of us who have endured sexual violence. The goal is to provide a mechanism to support survivors and move people to action. Any other characterization severely handicaps our ability to move the work forward.
#MeToo  sexual_assault 
10 weeks ago by Quercki

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