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Remembering the Howard University Librarian Who Decolonized the Way Books Were Catalogued | History | Smithsonian
In a 1995 interview with Linton Weeks of the Washington Post, the Howard University librarian, collector and self-described “bibliomaniac” Dorothy Porter reflected on the focus of her 43-year career: “The only rewarding thing for me is to bring to light information that no one knows.
Pocket  academia  race 
yesterday by j-l-r
Publish in Journals! – Ehud Reiter's Blog
pros and cons of publishing in journals and conferences
academia  publishing 
yesterday by aparrish
Ellen Cleghorne on Saturday Night Live’s race problem and her trailblazing past.
“Performance studies taught me to look at something and see one thing in everything,” Cleghorne says. “That gives you an opportunity, as there’s a never-ending amount of things you can write about, or write a sketch about. We’re all in resistance to something, and that’s what comedy is.”
comedy  writing  television  presence  academia  education  creativity 
yesterday by allaboutgeorge
Changing demographics of scientific careers: The rise of the temporary workforce | PNAS
Contemporary science has been characterized by an exponential growth in publications and a rise of team science. At the same time, there has been an increase in the number of awarded PhD degrees, which has not been accompanied by a similar expansion in the number of academic positions. In such a competitive environment, an important measure of academic success is the ability to maintain a long active career in science. In this paper, we study workforce trends in three scientific disciplines over half a century. We find dramatic shortening of careers of scientists across all three disciplines. The time over which half of the cohort has left the field has shortened from 35 y in the 1960s to only 5 y in the 2010s. In addition, we find a rapid rise (from 25 to 60% since the 1960s) of a group of scientists who spend their entire career only as supporting authors without having led a publication. Altogether, the fraction of entering researchers who achieve full careers has diminished, while the class of temporary scientists has escalated. We provide an interpretation of our empirical results in terms of a survival model from which we infer potential factors of success in scientific career survivability. Cohort attrition can be successfully modeled by a relatively simple hazard probability function. Although we find statistically significant trends between survivability and an author’s early productivity, neither productivity nor the citation impact of early work or the level of initial collaboration can serve as a reliable predictor of ultimate survivability.
sociology_of_science  demographics  academia 
2 days ago by rvenkat
The job market in English
“There is no doubt we are at historic lows”:the job market in English.
academia 
2 days ago by M.Leddy

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