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Revealed: the areas in the UK with one Airbnb for every four homes | Airbnb | The Guardian
The Guardian cross-referenced a database of more than 250,000 Airbnb listings with government housing stock figures to calculate the “penetration rate” of Airbnbs in 8,000 areas across England, Wales and Scotland. Across the whole of Great Britain, there were 0.8 Airbnb listings for every 100 homes.
Listings data – covering the six months to January – was provided by Inside Airbnb, a non-commercial project that aims to highlight the impact of the service on residential housing markets.
dj  airbnb  Guardian  housing  tourism  gigeconomy 
yesterday by paulbradshaw
The Perils of Semi-Legal Poker
"Pollman and Barry are skeptical about the long-term prospects for poker clubs in Texas. 'There’s some question of their likelihood of success, given that it’s now tied up with this other criminal stuff,' Pollman said. In their view, however, regulatory entrepreneurship in general is likely to become more common. Legislative gridlock at the national level gives state and local governments more say over the law. The widely trumpeted success of companies like Uber and Airbnb has made investors and businesspeople more comfortable with regulatory risk. Every business is a gamble, but regulatory entrepreneurs play an unusually risky game. The rules are unclear; sometimes, it can even be hard to say who else is playing."
a:Kashmir-Hill  p:The-New-Yorker/The-Sporting-Scene  d:2019.09.10  w:5500  gambling  regulation  risk  business  Texas  law  law-enforcement  Uber  Airbnb  from instapaper
2 days ago by bankbryan
I stumbled across a huge Airbnb scam that’s taking over London | WIRED UK
It’s November 2019 and I’m standing in an Airbnb in Battersea, south London. But this is not the Airbnb I booked. Everything is slightly, confusingly, off. All the rooms are the wrong sizes, all the furniture in the wrong places.
airbnb 
2 days ago by jeffhammond
The a16z Marketplace 100
Over the past few decades, marketplaces like eBay, Airbnb, Uber and Lyft, Alibaba, and Instacart, have become some of the most impactful companies in the world economy. Collectively, millions of individuals and small businesses make a living operating on these platforms, where hundreds of billions of dollars of goods and services trade hands each year. Today, ridesharing platforms alone account for roughly 1 percent of US household income and there are an estimated 75 million gig workers in the US, and growing, according to the Fed. By possessing powerful network effects, marketplaces can become huge economies themselves. Over time, such companies have revolutionized a series of diverse industries, from travel to food to childcare. Marketplaces are at the center of many of society’s most important trends—the gig economy, the new generation of creative work, microentrepreneurship, and beyond. There’s much more to come. As investors in Airbnb, Instacart, and many others, it’s no secret that we’re bullish on (if not obsessed with) marketplace companies.
new-companies  airbnb  uber  ecommerce 
2 days ago by dancall
I stumbled across a huge Airbnb scam that’s taking over London
It’s November 2019 and I’m standing in an Airbnb in Battersea, south London. But this is not the Airbnb I booked. Everything is slightly, confusingly, off. All the rooms are the wrong sizes, all the furniture in the wrong places.
airbnb 
3 days ago by josephaleo
I stumbled across a huge Airbnb scam that’s taking over London | WIRED UK
The curious tale of a man called Christian, the Catholic church, David Schwimmer’s wife, a secret hotel and an Airbnb scam running riot on the streets of London
Airbnb  housing  accommodation  regulation  review  critique  London  Wired  2020 
6 days ago by inspiral
Alexandra Erin on Twitter: "If you find yourself using AirBNB, here's what I would suggest, based on the past ~5 years of scammer stories: 1. Plug the address into Google Maps first. 2. Compare Street View pictures of the property to the interior photos.
“If you find yourself using AirBNB, here’s what I would suggest, based on the past ~5 years of scammer stories:

“1. Plug the address into Google Maps first.
“2. Compare Street View pictures of the property to the interior photos.
“3. Verify the hosts exist.”
airbnb  AlexandraErin  twitter  2020  scams 
7 days ago by handcoding

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