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Shiori
Pinboard and Delicious OS X client
Apple  apps  software  OSX  pinboard  delicious  client 
yesterday by squishyrobot
Daring Fireball: Public Service Announcement: You Should Not Force Quit Apps on iOS
The single biggest misconception about iOS is that it’s good digital hygiene to force quit apps that you aren’t using. The idea is that apps in the background are locking up unnecessary RAM and consuming unnecessary CPU cycles, thus hurting performance and wasting battery life.
That’s not how iOS works. The iOS system is designed so that none of the above justifications for force quitting are true. Apps in the background are effectively “frozen”, severely limiting what they can do in the background and freeing up the RAM they were using. iOS is really, really good at this. It is so good at this that unfreezing a frozen app takes up way less CPU (and energy) than relaunching an app that had been force quit. Not only does force quitting your apps not help, it actually hurts. Your battery life will be worse and it will take much longer to switch apps if you force quit apps in the background.
ioshints  apps  daring_fireball 
yesterday by rgl7194
27 Must-Have Apps You (Probably) Don’t Know About – Product Hunt
Magnet for Mac - Keep your workspace organized. (Mac, Productivity, and Task Management) Read the opinion of 50 influencers. Discover 8 alternatives like Bet...
apps 
yesterday by randie
Public Service Announcement: You Should Not Force Quit Apps on iOS
"The single biggest misconception about iOS is that it’s good digital hygiene to force quit apps that you aren’t using."

- John Gruber
Daring Fireball
iOS  tips  advice  force-quit  myth  misconception  background  background-apps  app-switcher  multitasking  multitasking-switcher  battery-life  battery  apps  ForceQuit  force-quiting  ForceQuiting  quit  quiting  close  closing  mobile  iPhone  DaringFireball  JohnGruber  John-Gruber  geeky  feedy 
yesterday by Mykl
Social Media, Surveillance, and News Work: On the apps promising journalists a “crystal ball”: Digital Journalism: Vol 0, No 0
Social media platforms are becoming an indispensable resource for journalists. Their use involves both direct interaction with the platforms themselves and, increasingly, the use of specialist third-party apps to find, filter, and follow content and contributors. This article explores some of the ways that social media platforms, and their technological ecosystems, are infusing news work. A range of platforms and apps—including Geofeedia, Spike, and Twitter—were critically examined, and their use by trainee journalists (N = 81) analysed. The results reveal how journalists can—and do—surveil social network users and their content via sophisticated, professional apps that are also utilised by the police and security forces. While journalists recognise the value of such apps in news work, they also have concerns, including about privacy and popularism. Although the participants in this study thought the apps they used could help with verification, there were warning signs that an over-reliance on the technology could develop, dulling journalists’ critical faculties.
sm  surveillance  Research  apps  privacy  dashboards 
yesterday by paulbradshaw
Daring Fireball: Public Service Announcement: You Should Not Force Quit Apps on iOS
The single biggest misconception about iOS is that it’s good digital hygiene to force quit apps that you aren’t using. The idea is that apps in the background are locking up unnecessary RAM and consuming unnecessary CPU cycles, thus hurting performance and wasting battery life.
apple  apps  ios  iphone 
yesterday by tobi_s

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