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How Do I Download an Entire Website for Offline Reading?
It’s easy enough to save individual web pages for offline reading, but what if you want to download an entire website? Well, it’s easier than you think! Here are four nifty tools you can use to download any website for offline reading, zero effort required.
Wget is a command-line utility that can retrieve all kinds of files over the HTTP and FTP protocols. Since websites are served through HTTP and most web media files are accessible through HTTP or FTP, this makes Wget an excellent tool for ripping websites.

While Wget is typically used to download single files, it can be used to recursively download all pages and files that are found through an initial page:
scraping  tools  archives  cache  commandline  wget 
yesterday by paulbradshaw
Sarah Jamie Lewis on Twitter: "Can I just say, again, that archiving personal content, especially personal nsfw content, without an opt-in (or at the very least an opt-out) is completely unethical?… https://t.co/JbuGjO4fkY"
Can I just say, again, that archiving personal content, especially personal nsfw content, without an opt-in (or at the very least an opt-out) is completely unethical?...Taking possession of content that was never yours and deciding that it should be forever publicly accessible is bullshit.
tumblr  archives 
2 days ago by jomc
Trustworthy technology: the future of digital archives | The National Archives blog
If you wanted to watch one of your old video tapes, would you be able to? Do you still watch your DVD collection, or do you prefer to stream movies now? Th
blockchain  archives  nationalarchive  digitalpreservation 
7 days ago by jessogden
Letterform Archive – Announcing the Online Archive
"Experience Letterform Archive from anywhere in the world."



"When guests visit the Archive our goal is to inspire them through radical access to our collection of graphic design and typography artifacts. The aim is to encourage discovery through visual exploration. Now we’re making that experience available to everyone everywhere with the new Online Archive. Charter members will receive exclusive access to the beta before we officially go live in 2019.

An archive designed for designers
There are many library and museum catalogs online, but Letterform Archive’s site was made with graphic designers in mind. Our visual search feature supports a serendipitous browse, while navigating with precision. See instant results as you filter and combine people, firms, disciplines, decades, countries, and formats. Each item is photographed with the goal of fidelity to the original object. The web optimized images retain as much of this detail as possible, even when zooming, while remaining browsable from any device.

The Online Archive was made possible by many incredibly generous volunteers who spent hundreds of hours helping us catalog material. We owe a special debt to data virtuoso Murray Grigo-McMahon who gave his time to create and produce the site. The look and feel was executed by our talented friends Jon Sueda, chris hamamoto, and Omar Mohammad.

Discover, research, and teach from anywhere in the world
Your gift also provides resources for students, educators, designers, and a global community of those who love letters. More importantly, your support allows those who can’t visit us in person to experience the breadth and depth of our collection.

• Students can discover and learn from some of the best designers in the world, with access to process and original artwork that’s unique to the Archive’s collection.
• Teachers and educators can visually enhance lectures by navigating through graphic design and type history at the highest resolution.
• Designers of all kinds can dive into research for any project. From packaging and branding, to book jackets, type design, and more, inspiration is easily found.

Our collection awaits you
On the week of December 10, members can explore over 1,000 catalogued, imaged items such as:

• Selections from the Emigre, Aaron Marcus, and Ross F. George archives
• Ephemera and specimens from metal type foundries
• Sketches and mechanicals by Michael Doret
• Brochures and catalogs by Ladislav Sutnar
• Book jackets by Philip Grushkin, Alvin Lustig, Elaine Lustig Cohen, and George Salter
• Illustration and advertising by Dorothy and Otis Shepard
• Packaging by Jacob Jongert
• Corporate identity manuals

With a collection of around 50,000 objects, digitization will be an ongoing process, which means you’ll always be able to find something new. Your membership helps us digitize faster."

["The Online Archive Demo"
https://vimeo.com/303804447 ]
archives  design  2018  online  web 
10 days ago by robertogreco
How Cheap Labor Drives China’s A.I. Ambitions
Some of the most critical work in advancing China’s technology goals takes place in a former cement factory in the middle of the country’s heartland, far from the aspiring Silicon Valleys of Beijing and Shenzhen. An idled concrete mixer still stands in the middle of the courtyard. Boxes of melamine dinnerware are stacked in a warehouse next door.

Inside, Hou Xiameng runs a company that helps artificial intelligence make sense of the world. Two dozen young people go through photos and videos, labeling just about everything they see. That’s a car. That’s a traffic light. That’s bread, that’s milk, that’s chocolate. That’s what it looks like when a person walks.

“I used to think the machines are geniuses,” Ms. Hou, 24, said. “Now I know we’re the reason for their genius.”

In China, long the world’s factory floor, a new generation of low-wage workers is assembling the foundations of the future. Start-ups in smaller, cheaper cities have sprung up to apply labels to China’s huge trove of images and surveillance footage. If China is the Saudi Arabia of data, as one expert says, these businesses are the refineries, turning raw data into the fuel that can power China’s A.I. ambitions.

Conventional wisdom says that China and the United States are competing for A.I. supremacy and that China has certain advantages. The Chinese government broadly supports A.I. companies, financially and politically. Chinese start-ups made up one third of the global computer vision market in 2017, surpassing the United States. Chinese academic papers are cited more often in research papers. In a key policy announcement last year, the China government said that it expected the country to become the world leader in artificial intelligence by 2030.

Most importantly, this thinking goes, the Chinese government and companies enjoy access to mountains of data, thanks to weak privacy laws and enforcement. Beyond what Facebook, Google and Amazon have amassed, Chinese internet companies can get more because people there so heavily use their mobile phones to shop, pay for meals and buy movie tickets.
artificial_intelligence  labor  digital_labor  china  images  classification  archives  automation 
11 days ago by shannon_mattern
KULA : Endangered Knowledge
Guest editors Samantha MacFarlane, Rachel Mattson, and Bethany Nowviskie have assembled a collection of scholarly articles, pedagogical reflections, and project reports that take up theoretical and practical considerations of archival salvage and erasure, the persistence of the public record, indigenous knowledge, and the politics of loss. The special issue explores endangerment as a critical category of analysis for records, data, collections, languages, ecosystems, and networks.
archives  indigenous  records  preservation 
12 days ago by shannon_mattern

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