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"...the main way that the Kindle and other digital devices have transformed books is to make them as liquid as possible."
At Wired, my old colleague David Pierce writes about a topic near and dear to my heart: Amazon’s Kindle, and its effects on how we buy and read books:

For a decade, Amazon’s relentlessly offered new ways for people to read books. But even as platforms change, books haven’t, and the incompatibility is beginning to show. Phones and tablets contain nothing of what makes a paperback wonderful. They’re full of distractions, eye-wrecking backlights, and batteries that die in a few hours. They also open up massive new opportunities. On a tablet, books don’t have to consist only of hundreds of pages set in a row. They can be easily navigable, endlessly searchable, and constantly updated. They can use images, video, even games to augment the experience….

The next phase for the digital book seems likely to not resemble print at all. Instead, the next step is for authors, publishers, and readers to take advantage of all the tools now at their disposal and figure out how to reinvent longform reading. Just as filmmakers like Steven Soderbergh are experimenting with what it means to make a “movie” that’s really an app on a totally interactive device with a smaller screen, Amazon and the book world are beginning to figure out what’s possible when you’re not dealing with paper anymore.

Except… not really.
reading  bffr 
10 days ago by paulgreer
Scientists create 'diamond rain' that forms in the interior of icy giant planets
"In an experiment designed to mimic the conditions deep inside the icy giant planets of our solar system, scientists were able to observe "diamond rain" for the first time as it formed in high-pressure conditions. Extremely high pressure squeezes hydrogen and carbon found in the interior of these planets to form solid diamonds that sink slowly down further into the interior."
science  bffr  link 
august 2017 by paulgreer
Deescalate Hate
Jello addresses how to properly resist the Neo-Nazi movement.
world  bffr 
august 2017 by paulgreer
Three synched performances of Fake Plastic Trees by Radiohead
Radiohead has performed Fake Plastic Trees at the Glastonbury Festival three times: in 1997, 2003, and 2017. This video synchs all three performances into one, with the audio switching between the three.
music  bffr 
july 2017 by paulgreer
Every solar eclipse in your lifetime
The continental United States gets a total solar eclipse on August 21, so Denise Lu for The Washington Post mapped out every total solar eclipse that will happen in your lifetime. Enter the year you were born and see the paths on the globe.
science  bffr  link 
july 2017 by paulgreer
VFX History of 'King Kong', From Stop Motion to Motion Capture | Inverse
Nowadays, when we see giant creatures stomping across our screens, it goes without saying that there’s some nifty computer graphics behind the action. And that’s certainly the case in Jordan Vogt-Roberts’ Kong: Skull Island, which features incredible visual effects from Industrial Light & Magic.
cgi  bffr  link 
february 2017 by paulgreer
Moral hazard and inhumanity
One bit of economic reasoning says, "If there are no consequences, people will make bad choices."
brainfood  bffr  link 
october 2016 by paulgreer
A Mesmerizing Glow-in-the-Dark Bike Path Unveiled in Poland
Seeking to make bike paths safer and more accessible in the evening and night hours, urban planners in Lidzbark Warminski, Poland just unveiled a new glow-in-the-dark bike lane. The path is made from small crystal-like particles of phosphor called ‘luminophores’ that charge during sunlight hours and can glow for up to 10 hours. The lane was built by TPA Instytut Badań Technicznych Sp. z o.o who were partially inspired by Studio Roosegaarde’s stunning solar-powered bike path in the Netherlands mentioned here in 2014. Unlike the Netherland’s concept which uses solar-powered LEDs, this new path in Poland requires no external power source. The design is currently being tested to see how it withstands regular wear and tear. You can read
science  bffr 
october 2016 by paulgreer
Rosetta mission ends in comet collision - BBC News
Europe's Rosetta probe has ended its mission to Comet 67P by crash-landing on to the icy object's surface.
Mission control in Darmstadt, Germany, was able to confirm the impact had occurred when radio contact to the ageing spacecraft was lost abruptly.
science  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
INFOGRAPHIC: The 10 Most Influential Poets in (Western) History
Robert Frost, William Carlos William, and Elizabeth Bishop may be some of the leading inspirations to poets today, but who influenced them? The folks over at My Poetic Side put together an infographic that studied over 250 poets and individually uncovered who influenced who. Check out the entire web below:
mindmaps  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
Google Files Patent Application For Hand-Controlled Mobile VR Headset
A patent filed by Google in February and published Sept. 15 shows a VR headset that might be powered by a phone you hold in your hand. The connection between the headset and phone would run over a long thin cord to a lightweight headset, or it could one day be completely wireless.
360  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
“The Wonderground Map of London Town,” the Iconic 1914 Map That Saved the World’s First Subway System
Most major world cities now boast far-reaching and convenient subway systems, but London will always have the original from which all the rest descend. It will also, arguably, always have, in the Tube, by far the most iconic. The Metropolitan Railway, the first underground train line to open in London and thus the first in the world, entered service in 1863. Other lines followed, run by several different companies, until, says Make Big Plans, all the operators “agreed on a joint marketing strategy in 1908 that featured the now familiar logo with a red disk and the word ‘Underground.'”
mindmaps  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
Mobile Virtual Reality Breakthrough Means Gear VR Could Soon Be As Powerful As Oculus Rift
Today, if you want to experience virtual reality, you have two options.

The first is mobile VR, which uses a relatively cheap headset paired with your smartphone screen to offer a somewhat immersive experience but without the ability to get up and move around inside the virtual world.

The second is a high-end headset like Facebook’s Oculus Rift or HTC’s Vive. These expensive products do allow you to move around within the virtual world thanks to positional-tracking technology in the headsets that work in conjunction with external sensors mounted on your wall — but your range of movement is limited.
360  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
Black hole to be seen for the first time ever with new computer algorithm | The Independent
he picture of an event horizon will be ready in 2017, according to the team behind it
bffr  science 
september 2016 by paulgreer
How to Develop VR for 770 million Users – Beyond the Headset – Medium
My main mission is to democratize game and experience development, meaning I am driven to make game development possible for the highest number of people we can find. We want to enable storytelling for everybody. The fundamental principle that drives the entire company is that every time we make this easier, we get new users; every time we make this easier, our new users stay with us and create content.
links  360  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
Artists Are Taking to ‘Tilt Brush’ with Incredible Results
Virtual reality has been described as a ‘new medium’—that is, a canvas for creation which is unique among other forms (books, radio, paint, music, video, etc). The truth of this is becoming abundantly clear thanks to artists who are adopting programs like Tilt Brush to make amazing works of art which offer undeniably
360  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
Wheels of Steel: Full-Sized Art Cars Made of Nothing But Scrap Metal
Their body panels consist of a lacework of metal gears, their windshields no more than mesh, their seats steel and the spaces under their hoods hollow, but these life-sized car sculptures still manage to look like they could fly down the street at top speeds at any moment. A group of 50 artists raids the scrapyards of Pruszków, Poland for trash they can integrate into their Gallery of Steel Figures, a museum full of impressively lifelike recycled art.
art  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
Visual Effects Pros Are Virtual Reality's Vanguard
When visual effects powerhouse Industrial Light
360  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer
This invention by a British student could save millions of lives across the world - BBC Newsbeat
A 22-year-old British student has invented a mobile fridge that could save millions of lives across the world.
Will Broadway's "Isobar" has been designed to keep vaccines at the ideal temperature while in transit in developing countries.
science  bffr 
september 2016 by paulgreer

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