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The Minute for 01.19.18:
5 Takeaways from 2018

These were the five big takeaways from t…
CES  eCommerce  from twitter
4 days ago by bartmroz
Twitter
The Minute for 01.19.18:
5 Takeaways from 2018

These were the five big takeaways from t…
CES  eCommerce  from twitter
4 days ago by bartmroz
CES 2018: Real Advances, Real Progress, Real Questions
After my 3 days and 87,207 steps I offer these five observations about the direction of products and technology on display at CES.
CES  review  consumerelectronics  voicerecognition  virtualassistant  Google  GoogleAssistant  television  OLED  headphones  Samsung  LG  strategy  augmentedreality  PCs  laptops  wirelesscharging  Qi  innovation  author:StevenSinofsky  LearningbyShipping  Medium  2018 
6 days ago by inspiral
CES 2018: real advances, real progress, real questions • Learning by Shipping
Steve Sinofsky (you know, the skateboarding on a Surface guy) went to Vegas:
<p>I’m confident that a core problem with voice right now are expectations. There’s all sorts of real world problems from home guests to people standing outside a window yelling into your house to deal with, but one does quickly get used to walking into a room and saying “Alexa please turn the lights on” and of course if you can also get questions about the weather and so on answered along with music, this is a net add.

Where voice really disappoints is the same way that almost every new product disappoints—it doesn’t do as much as you’d like or can imagine. Tech enthusiasts have been trying to do home automation scenarios for years—the idea of “programming” your home to lock the doors, arm perimeter security, turn off inside lights (except the bedroom), turn off the TV, turn on the baby monitor and so on all to the command “bedtime”. That’s not going to happen and anyone with that design point will fail. This will fail just like that microwave button “reheat” doesn’t work or voice response systems asking you “state your problem” always take you “please hold while I connect you to an operator”.

I’m optimistic about voice for basic command and control. Beyond that we are at the very early stages with a good deal of frustration ahead…

…[re TV sets]All the major players were showing large (up to 85") OLED screens all ultra-thin. Here’s a CES thing to notice. The fancy “not yet shipping” OLED TVs all have integrated bases upon which the 5mm screens rest. These bases are speaker bars and use some of the depth gained to enable a rear-firing subwoofer on the back of the panel. Since everyone is showing these it is likely where things are heading after 15 years of over the fireplace wall mounts and 4" recessed wall nooks that are never the right size for the next display.

Also there were basically no curved TVs and certainly zero 3D. I was trying to think of something that came and went as fast as 3D and all I could come up with might be VR headsets.</p>


Tons more great insight in his post. Set aside some time to read it.
ces  voice  google  tv 
7 days ago by charlesarthur
Twitter
RT : AMAZING: You could wrap your screen around your sleeve with wearable technology.
ces  from twitter
8 days ago by danmactough
Twitter
RT : AMAZING: You could wrap your screen around your sleeve with wearable technology.
ces  from twitter
8 days ago by danmactough
Sleek, smart, and chatty: The car dashboards of CES 2018
The thing is, true self-driving cars — ones that can drive on any street and take you door to door — are likely still several years away. The not as revolutionary but more immediate trend in automotive technology that will change the way we drive in the next few years are connected cars.
technology  trends  ces 
9 days ago by automotive
CES was full of useless robots and machines that don’t work • Daily Beast
Taylor Lorenz:
<p>Take the FoldiMate, a giant robotic machine that costs $850 that can supposedly fold your clothes. The machine, which took up more space than a washing machine, might be worth it if you could dump a huge pile of laundry inside some chamber and have your garments returned to you in neatly folded stacks. But that type of machine has yet to be built.

In order for the FoldiMate to work, you must individually button up each shirt then manually clip it onto the machine, which could be more time consuming than just folding everything yourself.

The machine can only fold certain items too. Dress pants and traditional button up shirts are fine, bulky sweatshirts, baby clothes, socks, or undergarments are off the table.

The FoldiMate fit right in with the other “smart home”-type products at CES, where the primary innovation in the past year seemed to be adding Amazon Alexa to absolutely everything.

The Haier smart mirror caught my eye as I stepped into the Central Hall of the convention center. It promised to help me dress by recommending outfits for travel, work, or a date. It could also give detailed washing instructions for different garments and track where it was sitting in my closet.

Intrigued, I asked how it would know so much about all my clothes. “Do I dump all my laundry into a big scanner?” I asked naively.</p>

Read it to find out just how naive. (Very.)
Ces2018  ces  robot  laundry 
11 days ago by charlesarthur
We found a deleted page that reveals the paparazzi roots of Kodak Coin | Ars Technica
The evidence strongly suggests that Kodak Coin is the re-branding of an initial coin offering called RYDE coin that never got much attention and was apparently aborted days before Kodak Coin was announced. Until recently, the project had a page on the crowdfunding site Start Engine. The page is no longer there, but Google cached a copy of the site on January 3.
bitcoin  blockchain  ces 
11 days ago by libbymiller

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