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Canada's forests actually emit more carbon than they absorb — despite what you've heard on Facebook | CBC News
trees don't just absorb carbon when they grow, they emit it when they die and decompose, or burn.

When you add up both the absorption and emission, Canada's forests haven't been a net carbon sink since 2001. Due largely to forest fires and insect infestations, the trees have actually added to our country's greenhouse gas emissions for each of the past 15 years on record
forest  climate-change  Canada  carbon 
5 days ago by tylerham
Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers
Biodiversity of insects is threatened worldwide. Here, we present a comprehensive review of 73 historical reports of insect declines from across the globe, and systematically assess the underlying drivers. Our work reveals dramatic rates of decline that may lead to the extinction of 40% of the world's insect species over the next few decades. [...] The main drivers of species declines appear to be in order of importance: i) habitat loss and conversion to intensive agriculture and urbanisation; ii) pollution, mainly that by synthetic pesticides and fertilisers; iii) biological factors, including pathogens and introduced species; and iv) climate change
insects  climate-change  biodiversity  2019  ecology  science  extinction 
5 days ago by zzkt
The Choice We Face – Current Affairs | Culture & Politics
We have five times as much oil and coal and gas on the books as climate scientists think is safe to burn. We’d have to keep 80 percent of those reserves locked away underground to avoid that fate. Before we knew those numbers, our fate had been likely. Now, barring some massive intervention, it seems certain. Yes, this coal and gas and oil is still technically in the soil. But it’s already economically aboveground – it’s figured into share prices, companies are borrowing money against it, nations are basing their budgets on the presumed returns from their patrimony. It explains why the big fossil-fuel companies have fought so hard to prevent the regulation of carbon dioxide – those reserves are their primary asset, the holding that gives their companies their value. It’s why they’ve worked so hard these past years to figure out how to unlock the oil in Canada’s tar sands, or how to drill miles beneath the sea, or how to frack the Appalachians. If you told Exxon or Lukoil that, in order to avoid wrecking the climate, they couldn’t pump out their reserves, the value of their companies would plummet. John Fullerton, a former managing director at JP Morgan who now runs the Capital Institute, calculates that at today’s market value, those 2,795 gigatons of carbon emissions are worth about $27 trillion. Which is to say, if you paid attention to the scientists and kept 80 percent of it underground, you’d be writing off $20 trillion in assets. The numbers aren’t exact, of course, but that carbon bubble makes the housing bubble look small by comparison.
bill_mckibben  climate-change  petroleum  energy  carbon_bubble 
5 days ago by perich
Columbus Lowered World Temperature - Marginal REVOLUTION
This is crazy! Contact with Europeans caused 90% of the native American population to die, mostly due to disease. Subsequently, so much farmland was reclaimed by trees that the global temperature dropped by 0.15°.

Crazy that science can measure effects so small and model effects so large. So crazy that I'm not sure I believe it.
science  interesting  climate-change 
10 days ago by num1
The impact intrapraneurs: How Swiss Re and Oxfam joined forces to help African farmers | Ethical Corporation, Oct 2017
"In this guest blog, Karen Deignan of Net-Works interviews Christina Ulardic of Swiss Re and Marjorie Brans, formerly of Oxfam America, to find out how they worked together to create the R4 Rural Resilience Initiative to tackle climate risk in Africa"

"The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative is a comprehensive risk-management initiative that helps smallholder farmers in Africa cope with the impacts of climate change. ...
R4 currently reaches over 40,000 farmers (about 200,000 people) in Ethiopia, Senegal, Malawi and Zambia through a combination of four risk-management strategies: improved resource-management through asset creation (risk reduction), insurance (risk transfer), livelihoods diversification and microcredit (prudent risk taking) and savings (risk reserves)."

"Swiss Re provided the insurance component, but there were other components designed to ensure farmers could grow their crops successfully, get access to micro-credit to buy more seeds, and build up some savings."
Oxfam  SwissRe  climate  resilience  interviews  climate-change  insurance  risk 
10 days ago by pierredv

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