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Nvidia is buying Mellanox Technologies in a $6.9 billion deal (NVDA) | Markets Insider
The offer, said to have beaten out the rival Intel, is the largest in Nvidia's history and will pay Mellanox shareholders $125 a share — a 14.3% premium to Friday's closing price.
"We're excited to unite Nvidia's accelerated computing platform with Mellanox's world-renowned accelerated networking platform under one roof to create next-generation data-center-scale computing solutions,"
nvidia  cpu  graphics  business 
7 days ago by jasonsamuels
Intel CPU shortages to worsen in 2Q19, says Digitimes Research • Digitimes
Jim Hsiao:
<p>Shortages of Intel's CPUs are expected to worsen in the second quarter compared to the first as demand for Chromebooks, which are mostly equipped with Intel's entry-level processors, enters the high period, according to Digitimes Research.

Digitimes Research expects Intel CPUs' supply gap to shrink to 2-3% in the first quarter with Core i3 taking over Core i5 as the series hit hardest by shortages.

The shortages started in August 2018 with major brands including Hewlett-Packard (HP), Dell and Lenovo all experiencing supply gaps of over 5% at their worst moment.

Although most market watchers originally believed that the shortages would gradually ease after vendors completed their inventory preparations for the year-end holidays, the supply gap in the fourth quarter of 2018 still stayed at the same level as that in the third as HP launched a second wave of CPU inventory buildup during the last quarter of the year, prompting other vendors to follow suit.

Taiwan-based vendors were underprepared and saw their supply gaps expand from a single digit percentage previously to over 10% in the fourth quarter.</p>


A "supply gap" implies that the (PC) vendor can't raise prices to reduce demand to match the supply. But if all the big names are suffering, why don't they want to raise prices?
pc  intel  cpu  shortage 
7 days ago by charlesarthur
Hardware for Deep Learning. Part 3: GPU – Intento
NVIDIA has severely limited FP16 and FP64 CUDA performance on gaming cards
powerful  cpu  gpu  computers 
8 days ago by nauce
AMD Athlon 64 LE-1620 - ADH1620IAA5DH (ADH1620DHBOX)
AMD Athlon 64 LE-1620 desktop CPU: detailed specifications, side by side comparison, FAQ, pictures and more from CPU-World
AMD  CPU 
11 days ago by snivitz
ExSpectre: Hiding Malware in Speculative Execution
Recently, the Spectre and Meltdown attacks revealed serious vulnerabilities in modern CPU designs, allowing
an attacker to exfiltrate data from sensitive programs. These
vulnerabilities take advantage of speculative execution to coerce
a processor to perform computation that would otherwise not
occur, leaking the resulting information via side channels to an
attacker.
In this paper, we extend these ideas in a different direction,
and leverage speculative execution in order to hide malware from
both static and dynamic analysis. Using this technique, critical
portions of a malicious program’s computation can be shielded
from view, such that even a debugger following an instructionlevel trace of the program cannot tell how its results were
computed.
We introduce ExSpectre, which compiles arbitrary malicious
code into a seemingly-benign payload binary. When a separate
trigger program runs on the same machine, it mistrains the CPU’s
branch predictor, causing the payload program to speculatively
execute its malicious payload, which communicates speculative
results back to the rest of the payload program to change its
real-world behavior.
We study the extent and types of execution that can be
performed speculatively, and demonstrate several computations
that can be performed covertly. In particular, within speculative execution we are able to decrypt memory using AES-NI
instructions at over 11 kbps. Building on this, we decrypt and
interpret a custom virtual machine language to perform arbitrary
computation and system calls in the real world. We demonstrate
this with a proof-of-concept dial back shell, which takes only
a few milliseconds to execute after the trigger is issued. We
also show how our corresponding trigger program can be a preexisting benign application already running on the system, and
demonstrate this concept with OpenSSL driven remotely by the
attacker as a trigger program.
ExSpectre demonstrates a new kind of malware that evades
existing reverse engineering and binary analysis techniques. Because its true functionality is contained in seemingly unreachable
dead code, and its control flow driven externally by potentially
any other program running at the same time, ExSpectre poses a
novel threat to state-of-the-art malware analysis techniques.
malware  cpu  papers  security  filetype:pdf  infosec  spectre  vulnerability 
13 days ago by jabley

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