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actually (27 Oct., 2003, at Interconnected)
"Dunbar contends that humans evolved vocal grooming (language) as a more efficient form of bonding. Assuming that our closest ancester, the chimpanzee, has hit the time budget limiting factor, and that our extra efficiency has all come about with the transition to vocal grooming, this means language is 2.8 times more efficient for bonding than the mechanism nonhuman primates use. That is, "a speaker should be able to interact with 2.8 times as many other individuals as a groomer can. Since the number of grooming partners is necessarily limited to one, this means that the limit on the number of listeners should be about 2.8. In other words, human conversation group sizes should be limited to about 3.8 in size (one speaker plus 2.8 listeners)." (Which makes sense if you think about the different qualities of a conversation with three versus four participants. A study is quoted to back this up.)"
mattwebb  2003  dunbar  dunbarnumber  grooming  primates  humans  groups  groupsize  conversation  speaking  interaction 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Three Questions for Robin Dunbar - Technology Review
3. How do social-networking tools shape offline social behavior? Could there be negative consequences that we haven't anticipated?

It's hard to say, because social networks haven't been around long enough. But there are two possibilities. One is that time spent on Facebook maintaining old friendships is time that can't be spent creating new ones. Since friends exist to be shoulders to cry on (metaphorically speaking!) and shoulders that are physically remote aren't much use for crying on, this might not be ideal. The other is perhaps more serious. The skills that allow us to manage our complex social world are partly learned through experience. If your social experience is largely online (as is becoming increasingly the case with children), then you may not be learning these social skills as well as you need to—that is, if the real learning of things such as negotiation has to be done face-to-face.
Friends  Q&A;  SocialNetworking  150  DunbarNumber  RobinDunbar 
july 2012 by n_m
Valve: How I Got Here, What It’s Like, and What I’m Doing | Valve
"My observation is that it takes new hires about six months before they fully accept that no one is going to tell them what to do, that no manager is going to give them a review, that there is no such thing as a promotion or a job title or even a fixed role (although there are generous raises and bonuses based on value to the company, as assessed by peers). That it is their responsibility, and theirs alone, to allocate the most valuable resource in the company – their time – by figuring out what it is that they can do that is most valuable for the company, and then to go do it. That if they decide that they should be doing something different, there’s no manager to convince to let them go; they just move their desk to the new group (the desks are on wheels, with computers attached) and start in on the new thing."
valve  games  videogames  studios  gamedevelopment  business  organisation  dunbarnumber  dunbar  300 
april 2012 by Nachimir
Matt Jones & Jack Schulze, “Immaterials” on Vimeo
"Matt Jones and Jack Schulze will explore a cross-section of recent and ongoing work from BERG, examining how the design of products and services comes from working intimately with the materials of your domain, even if they are intangible—like radio or data."

[Diagram at 16:33 mark reminds me of my interest in audiences of one.]
design  materialsim  jackschulze  mattjones  weakties  dunbar  dunbarnumber  materiality  audiencesofone  berg  berglondon  immaterials  smallgroups  groupsize  stongbonds  2011  data  comics  michelgondry  time  radioactivity  touch  from delicious
november 2011 by robertogreco
Human Brain Limits Twitter Friends To 150  - Technology Review
"The bottom line is this: social networking allows us to vastly increase the number of individual we can connect with. But it does nothing to change our capability to socialise. However hard we try, we cannot maintain close links with more than about 150 buddies."
internet  science  psychology  socialnetworking  twitter  dunbar  dunbarnumber  2011  from delicious
may 2011 by robertogreco
Tom Hume: Common lies of social software
"I've been mentally collecting "lies of social software"…So far I've come up with these, mainly based on my experiences w/ blogging, Flickr, Twitter & Facebook:

"Your friends are equally important". Dunbar pointed out that we have concentric circles of friends: 5 close ones, 15 acquaintances, 50 rough friends, etc. Yet in my friends lists on Twitter & Facebook, everyone's equal (& usually alphabetical). I like what Path have done around limiting size of your network, & Flickr concept of Family, Friends & Contacts - but what about software for just you & those 5 of your closest? Or for you and your other half?

"Your friends are arranged into discrete groups", w/ a corollary that these groups rarely change…

"You can manage hundreds of friends"…

"Friendship is reciprocal & equal". Some people are more important to me than I am to them, & vice versa; we might not like to face up to this in every day life but it's true nonetheless, & our digital tools don't reflect this…"
socialsoftware  via:preoccupations  dunbar  dunbarnumber  twitter  facebook  flickr  path  blogs  blogging  relationships  nuance  socialnetworking  socialmedia  from delicious
april 2011 by robertogreco
You’ve Got to Have (150) Friends - NYTimes.com
"Until relatively recently, almost everyone on earth lived in small, rural, densely interconnected communities, where our 150 friends all knew one another…

But social & economic mobility of past century has worn away at that interconnectedness. As we move aroundcountry across continents, we collect disparate pockets of friends, so that our list of 150 consists of a half-dozen subsets of people who barely know of one another’s existence, let alone interact.

…Emotional closeness declines by around 15% a year in the absence of face-to-face contact, so in 5 years someone can go from being an intimate acquaintance to the most distant outer layer of your 150 friends.

Facebook & other social networking sites allow us to keep up w/ friendships that would otherwise rapidly wither away. &…to reintegrate our networks so that, rather than having several disconnected subsets…we can rebuild, albeit virtually, the kind of old rural communities where everyone knew everyone else."
robindunbar  dunbar  dunbarnumber  friendship  relationships  facebook  economics  social  media  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  history  humans  from delicious
december 2010 by robertogreco
Why Evan Williams of Twitter Demoted Himself - NYTimes.com
"“I had a fierce desire to create things, to be independent and prove myself, which caused me to reject authority, but never in a sort of rebellious way,” he adds. “It was more like, ‘I’m going to show you by doing it all myself.’ ”…

“Ev was just very frustrated, and he had ideas for how we could do things differently and better,” recalls Tim O’Reilly, the publisher’s founder. “He had a little bit of attitude, a chip on his shoulder, but always with good spirit.”

Mr. Williams left O’Reilly after seven months — “I was bad at working for people,” he says…

Mr. Williams says that all successful businesspeople make enemies along the way. Yet he also says he learned from the Blogger experience. “I was trying to do everything myself when we were going through hard times,” he says. “When it was just me, I was happier, which I think is a sign of failure of working with people.”"
evanwilliams  business  twitter  management  leadership  cv  happiness  lonewolves  authority  entrepreneurship  creativity  dunbar  dunbarnumber  scale  bureaucracy  blogger  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
Twitter and the Dunbar Number - Rob's posterous
"As a reminder - Here are the Lego Blocks of the science of human groups. From these precise grouping you build the best performing organizations.

As with Lego, there is nothing random about how best to organize human beings. All well functioning organizations use these groups and they avoid the "Dip" - you will see the "Dip" below.

8 The Circle of Intimacy (The section): where you intuitively communicate as a great sports team will - 15 the dangerous nowhere group that you must either go back to 8 or rush to 34 from - 34 the ideal compound group (The platoon) - 89 the ideal large team - 144 The maximum unit where all can know each other to use trust rather than rules."
twitter  robertpatterson  communities  organizations  socialmedia  groupsize  dunbar  community  psychology  learning  knowledge  business  capacity  sociology  social  hr  leadership  administration  management  tcsnmy  lcproject  classsize  dunbarnumber  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
[from rgreco] Twitter and the Dunbar Number - Rob's posterous
"As a reminder - Here are the Lego Blocks of the science of human groups. From these precise grouping you build the best performing organizations.

As with Lego, there is nothing random about how best to organize human beings. All well functioning organizations use these groups and they avoid the "Dip" - you will see the "Dip" below.

8 The Circle of Intimacy (The section): where you intuitively communicate as a great sports team will - 15 the dangerous nowhere group that you must either go back to 8 or rush to 34 from - 34 the ideal compound group (The platoon) - 89 the ideal large team - 144 The maximum unit where all can know each other to use trust rather than rules."


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twitter  robertpatterson  communities  organizations  socialmedia  groupsize  dunbar  community  psychology  learning  knowledge  business  capacity  sociology  social  hr  leadership  administration  management  tcsnmy  lcproject  classsize  dunbarnumber  from google
october 2010 by roomthily
Robert Paterson's Weblog: Fixing Education - #The Social Environment is the Key
"The average class size is 12. This is in the realm of conversation that has an upper limit of close to 20. It means that many clases are about 8 which is the ideal human social design for conversation. When groups are over 23 conversation is impossible. There are two many possible connections.

Yes smaller classes are better. But reducing a class size from 34 to 26 achieves nothing. The Zone is 13 or less with 8 being best. Not a matter of opinion just as the laws of gravity are not a matter for debate either."
groups  groupsize  dunbar  dunbarnumber  schools  education  learning  conversation  robertpatterson  teaching  social  environment  resilience  empathy  lcproject  tcsnmy  socialresponsibility  connections  from delicious
october 2010 by robertogreco
kung fu grippe: Episode 27: Missionless Statements
"In this special episode, Dan Benjamin talks with two of his heroes, Merlin Mann & Jeff Veen about independence, free thinking, email, productivity, & changing your game."

[There is more here (on shared values, innovation, organizations, management, entreprenuership, change, etc.) than my notes reflect—all worth the listen.]

[Video also at: http://5by5.tv/conversation/27 ]
dunbar  dunbarnumber  groupsize  classsize  productivity  management  administration  tcsnmy  lcproject  jeffreyveen  merlinmann  danbenjamin  email  communication  leadership  problemsolving  technology  enterprise  independence  freethinking  gamechanging  time  small  slow  ambientintimacy  relationships  understanding  efficiency  human  humanconnection  campfire  offhtheshelfsoftware  values  organizations  groups  sharedvalues  culture  failure  innovation  cv  risktaking  risk  freelancing  motivation  danielpink  meaning  autonomy  drive  missionstatement  vision 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Why Dunbar's Number is Irrelevant [Social Media Today]
"What social networks have allowed us to do is to build massive networks of weak ties. I use these weak ties all the time to reach out to folks for guest articles, business requests, speaking engagements, or ideas and advice. The mere fact that we are connected to people online creates a type of weak tie because you can always reach out to the person you are connected with."
monkeysphere  dunbarnumber  via:robertogreco  socialnetworking 
july 2010 by ouroboros
Why Dunbar's Number is Irrelevant | Social Media Today
"I recently finished reading Morten Hansen's fantastic book on Collaboration in which he states that the real value of collaboration and of networks doesn't come from strong relationships and networks but from weak one's. In fact one of Morten's network rules is actually “build weak ties, not strong ones.” According to Morten:
dunbar  dunbarnumber  collaboration  socialmedia  sociology  networks  weakties  strongties  relationships  pln  knowledge  sharing  networking  mortenhansen 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Why Dunbar's Number is Irrelevant | Social Media Today
"I recently finished reading Morten Hansen's fantastic book on Collaboration in which he states that the real value of collaboration and of networks doesn't come from strong relationships and networks but from weak one's. In fact one of Morten's network rules is actually “build weak ties, not strong ones.” According to Morten:

“But research shows that weak ties can prove much more helpful in networking, because they form bridges to worlds we do not walk within. Strong ties, on the other hand, tend to be worlds we already know; a good friends often knows many of the same people and things we know. They are not the best when it comes to searching for new jobs, ideas, experts, and knowledge. Weak ties re also good because they take less time. It's less time consuming to talk to someone once a month (weak tie) than twice a week (a strong tie). People can keep up quite a few weak ties without them being a burden.”"
dunbar  dunbarnumber  collaboration  socialmedia  sociology  networks  weakties  strongties  relationships  pln  knowledge  sharing  networking  mortenhansen 
july 2010 by robertogreco

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