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dustincurtis

When to Stop | Dustin Curtis
“Being creative is a battle fought over the slow conversion of a mere idea into something tangible that you think is great.”
dustincurtis  creativity  perfection 
april 2018 by mr
It drives itself
I remember reading the initial reviews of Tesla’s “Autopilot” functionality and thinking that it sounded cool. Even the review videos looked cool. But actually experiencing it–literally feeling the car’s computer make decisions as it approached curves and obstacles–was one of the more profound experiences of my life. For only the second time I can remember–the first time was while using the original iPhone–I muttered under my breath, “I am experiencing the future”.
Tesla  selfdrivingvehicles  review  author:DustinCurtis  DustinCurtis  2016 
january 2016 by inspiral
Amazon’s Echo Chamber
I used to give Amazon’s consumer hardware strategy the benefit of the doubt. I liked the original e-ink Kindles, even though they were made out of cheap plastic. I kind of understood the first Kindle Fire tablet, even though it was a piece... | Dustin Curtis | Villain.
Amazon  AmazonEcho  AmazonFirePhone  critique  DustinCurtis  hardware 
november 2014 by otlib
Amazon’s Echo Chamber
Amazon’s retail strategy of being allergic to profit does not translate well into hardware manufacturing. People buy hardware that fits into their lives, and becomes part of how they identify themselves to the world. If you want to sell hardware, you have to be in fashion, like Samsung was two years ago, or like Apple has always been. Amazon is incapable of understanding fashion, because it has no taste, and its hardware is completely unfashionable and tasteless.

Amazon is slowly destroying itself from the inside out, through its own echo chamber, by focusing on a strategy that will never work and does not even make sense.
AmazonEcho  AmazonFirePhone  Amazon  strategy  hardware  critique  DustinCurtis  2014 
november 2014 by inspiral
Moxie Marlinspike >> Blog >> The Worst
"The Worst

So I’d like to respond with an alternate philosophy that I will call “the worst.” The worst stands in direct contrast to Dustin Curtis, and suggests that one is actually more likely to engender a liberated life by getting the very worst of everything whenever possible.

The basic premise of the worst is that both ideas and material possessions should be tools that serve us, rather than things we live in service to. When that relationship with material possessions is inverted, such that we end up living in service to them, the result is consumerism. When that relationship with ideas is inverted, the result is ideology or religion.

Any reasonable person wouldn’t feel liberated by a $50 fork, but constrained by it. One wouldn’t be able to help but worry: is it being cared for correctly, is my friend going to mess it up when absentmindedly tapping the table with it, is it going to get dropped or stepped on if a dance party erupts in the kitchen? After all, it is the perfect fork, what if something happened to it to make it… not perfect? The point shouldn’t be the cutlery, but the meal — and more importantly the relationships involved with preparing and sharing it.

Partisans of the worst will get 15 sets of cutlery (out of a bucket that’s an overflowing fucking sea of cutlery) for fifty cents at the neighborhood thrift shop, and as a result, won’t have the slightest reservation if five of their housemates simultaneously decide to start a band that uses nothing but spoons for instruments. Partisans of the worst won’t give a shit if someone drops a dish while people are hanging out in the kitchen. They can push their crappy bicycle to the limit without worrying if it gets scratched — without even being too concerned about it getting stolen. They can play a spontaneous game of tag in the park without worrying about their clothes getting messed up, or go for an impromptu hike without worrying about their shoes getting scuffed or dirty. Partisans of the worst will have more fun occasionally sneaking into the hot tub on the roof of a random apartment building than owning a hot tub of one’s own which is available for daily use.

The logic of the best is so pernicious because it’s poised to monopolize — an emphasis on the consumption of material goods can easily translate into a life of generalized consumption. A whole language can start to develop around not just the consumption of goods, but the consumption of experience: “We did Prague.” “We did Barcelona.”

“The best moments of my life, I never want to live again.”

Dustin Curtis also suggests that as a partisan of the best, he is taking on the hardship of truly understanding a domain in order to identify the best consumer good within that domain. Presumably, this means he now knows more about forks than any partisan of the worst ever will.

But internet research isn’t necessarily the same as understanding. No matter how much research they do, a partisan of the best might not ever know as much about motorcycles as the partisan of the worst who takes a series of hare-brained cross-country motorcycle trips on a bike that barely runs, and ends up learning a ton about how to fix their constantly breaking bike along the way. The partisan of the best will likely never know as much about sailing as the partisan of the worst who gets the shitty boat without a working engine that they can immediately afford, and has no choice but to learn how to enter tight spaces and maneuver under sail.

The best means waiting, planning, researching, and saving until one can acquire the perfect equipment for a given task. Partisans of the best will probably never end up accidentally riding a freight train 1000 miles in the wrong direction, or making a new life-long friend while panhandling after losing everything in Transnistria, or surreptitiously living under a desk in an office long after their internship has run out — simply because optimizing for the best probably does not leave enough room for those mistakes. Even if the most stalwart advocates of the worst would never actually recommend choosing to put oneself in those situations intentionally, they probably wouldn’t give them up either.

Green & Responsibility

Some amongst the best will resort to a resources perspective and say that in this increasingly disposable world, it’s refreshingly responsible for those of the best to be making quality long-term buying decisions. But we’re a long way away from a shortage of second-hand forks in the global north — let’s take care of those first.

Simplify

Hacker News could possibly be drawn to Dustin Curtis’ cutlery because it’s reminiscent of “simplify.” The makers of the cutlery took the concept to its core essentials, and nominally perfected them. But to me, “simplify” is about removing clutter — about de-emphasizing the things that are unimportant so that it’s easy to focus on the things that are. We shouldn’t be putting any emphasis on the things in our life, we should be trying to make them as insignificant as possible, so that we can focus on what’s important.

In a sense, the best gives a nod to this by suggesting that getting the very best of everything will somehow make those things invisible to us. That if we can blindly trust them, we won’t have to think about them. But the worst counters that if we’d like to de-emphasize things that we don’t want to be the focus of our life, we probably shouldn’t start by obsessing over them. That we don’t simplify by getting the very best of everything, we simplify by arranging our lives so that those things don’t matter one way or the other.

Perhaps P.O.S. said it best in their recent video: “Fuck Your Stuff”
[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FY6VcJR2PE ] "
consumerism  simplicity  used  reuse  dustincurtis  pos  responsibility  possessions  theworst  knowing  understanding  green  disposability  second-hand  moxiemarlinspike 
march 2014 by robertogreco
The Life of Dustin Curtis
Dustin Curtis describes posting mundane photos of his life to a Posterous site and the benefits he finds from it
dcurtis  dustincurtis  photographs  photos  posterous 
january 2014 by fraser
Photography’s Third Act | Dustin Curtis
"Since using that early prototype of Treehouse, I've been wanting something that replicated the feeling of using photos for communication, and nothing has come close. It seems that every photo sharing app ends up adding features like commenting, which destroys the fundamental value of the photos themselves; all photo sharing apps have regressed into apps for artistic expression.

Until Snapchat, which has captured the essence of using photos as communication. Because it is completely ephemeral – and because the photos are deleted after 1-10 seconds – it's impossible to use the photos for anything but communication. It's an amazing app, and its popularity is just a hint of how I think we'll use photos in the future."

[via: ""photography's third act" -- photos for individual communication as opposed to artistry -- by @dcurtis" https://twitter.com/atlin__/status/319984386521059328 ]`
snapchat  dustincurtis  communication  photography  2013  treehouse  instagram  commenting  ephemeral  sharing  liking  favoriting  social  ephemerality  favorites  faving 
april 2013 by robertogreco
http://dustincurtis.com/dear_american_airlines.html
What happened when a designer decided to give American Airlines some advice on how to make their site better.
webdesign  americanairlines  design  DustinCurtis  from delicious
april 2013 by iankennedy
Yours vs. Mine | Dustin Curtis
Dustin Curtis on using "My Stuff" vs. "Your Stuff" in interface design. I agree with his conclusion (User should "be communicating with the interface rather than the interface being an extension of" them).
design  ui  ux  dustincurtis  you  me 
february 2013 by fraser
The Glass Bicycle | Dustin Curtis
Great post from Dustin Curtis. Original surface was $10,000. Apple brought it to consumers for $500. "When you're first shown the future, it's hard to see it. If you don't immediately use some imagination to evolve what you're being shown into what it can or will become, you might dismiss it.
dustincurtis  surface  ipad  future 
february 2013 by fraser
The Flimsy Doorknob & A Forgettable Receipt + Dustin Curtis
If this receipt was printed on nice slightly-thicker paper with properly kerned fonts, You’d probably stop and look at it for a few seconds before you put it away. You might even keep it or share it with friends. It’s something remarkable. It’s something that says “hey, we value your purchase, so we’ll spend some time on your receipt.”
dustincurtis  interestingness  design  receipt 
april 2012 by sspela
Codename: Svbtle by Dustin Curtis
"…I decided to build my own solution to power dcurt.is. It is codenamed Svbtle. The first interface I built just contained a simple list of articles with a “new post” form, like almost every other blogging management system ever created, but it has slowly evolved into something that has hugely improved the quality of my thinking and writing."

"This interface doesn't force me into thinking about ideas as posts, like every other blogging system does. I don't have to sit down and think about a title and content, and I'm not expected to publish immediately. The disconnection between draft ideas and published posts makes a big subconscious difference. It allows ideas to start abstractly, to ruminate for a while, and then, as I work on them, to become more and more concrete until they're ready to be published as articles. The side effect of this is that ideas I would never have written down before now become fully developed posts. It has hugely surprised me."
ideas  bloggingplatform  onlinetoolkit  interface  platform  svbtle  dustincurtis  thinking  writing  blogging  from delicious
april 2012 by robertogreco

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