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NSA deleted surveillance data it pledged to preserve
The agency tells a federal judge that it is investigating and 'sincerely regrets its failure.'
clippings  privacy  surveillance  National+Security+Agency  courts  evidence  EFF 
yesterday by mjb
EFF and Lookout Uncover New Malware Espionage Campaign Infecting Thousands Around the World
A massive hacking campaign tied to a powerful Lebanese security agency targeting activists, journalists, military personnel, and lawyers has been revealed in a new report by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and mobile security firm Lookout. The report relied on planted malware in "trojanized apps" to siphon personal information from "thousands of people in more than 20 countries." The fake apps, which included Signal and WhatsApp lookalikes, "function like the legitimate apps and send and receive messages normally. However, the fake apps also allow the attackers to take photos, retrieve location information, capture audio, and more."

Says EFF: "The threat, called Dark Caracal by EFF and Lookout researchers, may be a nation-state actor and appears to employ shared infrastructure which has been linked to other nation-state actors. In a new report, EFF and Lookout trace Dark Caracal to a building belonging to the Lebanese General Security Directorate in Beirut.

'People in the U.S., Canada, Germany, Lebanon, and France have been hit by Dark Caracal. Targets include military personnel, activists, journalists, and lawyers, and the types of stolen data range from call records and audio recordings to documents and photos,' said EFF Director of Cybersecurity Eva Galperin. 'This is a very large, global campaign, focused on mobile devices. Mobile is the future of spying, because phones are full of so much data about a person’s day-to-day life.'"

Access the full report here (pdf): https://info.lookout.com/rs/051-ESQ-475/images/Lookout_Dark-Caracal_srr_20180118_us_v.1.0.pdf
otf  lebanon  security  eff 
2 days ago by dmcdev
Community Broadband: Privacy, Access, and Local Control | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Communities across the United States are considering strategies to protect residents’ access to information and their right to privacy. These experiments have a long history, but a new wave of activists have been inspired to seek a local response to federal setbacks to Internet freedom, such as the FCC’s decision to roll back net neutrality protections, and Congress’ early 2017 decision to eliminate user privacy protections.
Internet service providers (ISP) have a financial incentive and the technical ability to block or slow users' access, insert their own content on the sites we visit, or give preferential treatment to websites and services with which they have financial relationships. For many years, net neutrality principles and rules, most recently cemented in the FCC’s 2015 Open Internet Order, helped prevent much of this activity. Net neutrality helped create a landscape where new ideas and services could develop without being crowded out by political pressure or prioritized fast lanes for established commercial incumbents.
broadband  community  gov2.0  politics  privacy  EFF  net_neutrality 
2 days ago by rgl7194
The Public Domain Starts Growing Again Next Year, and It’s About Time | Electronic Frontier Foundation
We're taking part in Copyright Week, a series of actions and discussions supporting key principles that should guide copyright policy. Every day this week, various groups are taking on different elements of copyright law and policy, and addressing what's at stake, and what we need to do to make sure that copyright promotes creativity and innovation.
Have you ever wondered how it’s possible for there to be two Jungle Book movies to be in development at the same time? Why everything seems to be based on a work by Shakespeare? Or why it always seems like someone is telling a version of The Wizard of Oz? The answer is that these works are in the public domain, meaning that copyright law no longer prevents other artists from adapting them to create new works.
One major rationale for copyright is supposedly that, by giving an exclusive set of rights to artists for their work, we incentivize creativity by making it possible for artists to benefit from releasing works to the public. But copyright protection is supposed to be limited, and once it expires, a work enters the public domain, where anyone can use it.
copyright  EFF 
5 days ago by rgl7194
A Step in the Right Direction: House Passes the Cyber Vulnerability Disclosure Reporting Act | Electronic Frontier Foundation
The House of Representatives passed the “Cyber Vulnerability Disclosure Reporting Act” this week. While the bill is quite limited in scope, EFF applauds its goals and supports its passage in the Senate.
H.R. 3202 is a short and simple bill, sponsored by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX), that would require the Department of Homeland Security to submit a report to Congress outlining how the government deals with disclosing vulnerabilities. Specifically, the mandated report would comprise two parts. First, a “description of the policies and procedures developed [by DHS] for coordinating cyber vulnerability disclosures,” or in other words, how the government reports flaws in computer hardware and software to the developers. And second, a possibly classified “annex” containing descriptions of specific instances where these policies were used to disclose vulnerabilities in the previous year, leading to mitigation of the vulnerabilities by private actors.
gov2.0  security  privacy  cyber  EFF  congress 
7 days ago by rgl7194
New York City Adopts Historic Policing Reform | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Prompted by a diverse grassroots movement, much of the country continues to debate important proposed policing reforms at the local level. Many local policing campaigns that EFF supports focus on ending the era of law enforcement agencies acquiring surveillance equipment in secret. The latest campaign to prove successful secured a new law advancing transparency in New York City not only in policy, but also on the ground: the Right to Know Act.
Adopted in a two-part measure, the Right to Know Act responds to the experience of New Yorkers and visitors subjected to law enforcement stops, frisks, and searches of personal possessions including digital devices like cell phones and tablets. The City Council’s passage of the measures comes in spite of fear-mongering and falsehoods promoted by police unions.
nyc  police  EFF 
8 days ago by rgl7194
Ninth Circuit Doubles Down: Violating a Website’s Terms of Service Is Not a Crime | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Good news out of the Ninth Circuit: the federal court of appeals heeded EFF’s advice and rejected an attempt by Oracle to hold a company criminally liable for accessing Oracle’s website in a manner it didn’t like. The court ruled back in 2012 that merely violating a website’s terms of use is not a crime under the federal computer crime statute, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. But some companies, like Oracle, turned to state computer crime statutes—in this case, California and Nevada—to enforce their computer use preferences.
This decision shores up the good precedent from 2012 and makes clear—if it wasn’t clear already—that violating a corporate computer use policy is not a crime.
web  legal  EFF 
8 days ago by rgl7194
Ninth Circuit Doubles Down: Violating a Website’s Terms of Service Is Not a Crime | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Good news out of the Ninth Circuit: the federal court of appeals heeded EFF’s advice and rejected an attempt by Oracle to hold a company criminally liable for accessing Oracle’s website in a manner it didn’t like. The court ruled back in 2012 that merely violating a website’s terms of use is...
eff  tos  termsofservice  oracle 
10 days ago by mac
California Introduces Its Own Bill to Protect Net Neutrality | Electronic Frontier Foundation
2018 has barely begun, and so has the fight to preserve net neutrality. January 3 was the first day of business in the California state legislature, and state Sen. Scott Wiener used it to introduce legislation to protect net neutrality for Californians.
As the FCC has sought to abandon its role as the protector of a free and open Internet at the federal level, states are seeking ways to step into the void. Prior to December, the FCC’s rules prevented Internet service providers (ISPs) from blocking or slowing down traffic to websites. The rules also kept ISPs from charging users higher rates for faster access to certain websites or charging websites to be automatically included in any sort of “fast lane.” On December 14th, the FCC voted to remove these restrictions and even tried to make it harder for anyone else to regulate ISPs in a similar way.
fcc  gov2.0  internet  net_neutrality  politics  state  EFF 
12 days ago by rgl7194
How to Talk to Your Family About Digital Security | Electronic Frontier Foundation
You and your family are sipping hot cocoa, gathered around the [holiday object of your choice], and your family member suddenly asks: “Can you help me with my [insert device here]?”
They need a question answered about their computer, phone, tablet, video game console, or internet-connected device. Maybe they have related questions about their online accounts.
Or maybe there is a teenager or college student in your family that posts intensely personal information online, and has just realized that they should probably maintain more privacy in their online lives—but isn’t sure how to start.
Or perhaps the conversation of data breaches comes up around the dinner table, and Uncle Navid insists that the only way to protect yourself is to never go online at all.
security  privacy  digital  family  EFF  howto  passwords  encryption  2FA  social_media  tracking  messaging  signal 
12 days ago by rgl7194
Save the Open Internet Order | EFF Action Center
Please help save the open Internet and contact your Congress representatives today. has made it easy.
via
EFF  from twitter
13 days ago by pfhyper
How to Debug Your Content Blocker for Privacy Protection | Electronic Frontier Foundation
Millions of users are trying to protect their privacy from commercial tracking online, be it through their choice of browser, installation of ad and tracker blocking extensions, or use of a Virtual Private Network (VPN). This guide focuses on how to correctly configure the blocking extension in your browser to ensure that it's giving you the privacy you expect. We believe that tools work best when you don't have to go under the hood. While there is software which meets that criteria (and several are listed in the final section of the guide), the most popular ad blockers do not protect privacy by default and must be reconfigured. We'll show you how.
AdBlock Plus (Firefox)
AdBlock Plus (Chrome)
Adblock (Chrome)
Ghostery
Tracker-Blocking Alternatives
browser  howto  EFF  adblock  privacy  tracking 
13 days ago by rgl7194

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