recentpopularlog in

etymology

« earlier   
Is “Ass” The Most Complicated Word in English?
The Pudding shows us word usage (for "ass") with JavaScript sliders
language  example  webapps  etymology  javascript 
9 days ago by macloo
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/fiat
The origin of the word fiat in English is connected to the origin of the world itself. Taken from the Latin meaning “let it be done,” this word appears in the Latin translation of Genesis, the first book of the bible, when God proclaimed “let there be light” (fiat lux). As a result, many early uses of fiat were biblical allusions, as in John Donne’s …
dictionary  thesaurus  etymology  vocabulary  english  language  history  politics  religion  justice  law  legal  document  statutory  instruments  reference  brexit  europe 
22 days ago by asaltydog
Steven Poole's word of the week | Books | The Guardian
Each week, language enthusiast Steven Poole dissects the origins and meaning of the words of the moment.
dictionary  thesaurus  etymology  vocabulary  books  english  language  history  politics  religion  justice  law  legal  document  statutory  instruments  reference  guardian 
22 days ago by asaltydog
languagehat.com : Two Etymologies.
“Spruce’s” roots in Prussia, and “Tax”.
English  language  philology  etymology  words 
6 weeks ago by ahall
Why do we have so many words for yes and no?
Yes, on the other hand, started as ge or gæ, pronounced like "yeh." This became the word yea, as in "yea verily" and "Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death." Was the change to yes like the change to no? Yup. The ge joined with se, an Old English third-person subjunctive form of the verb "to be," to make it gese or gise. Which became yes. So both no and yes come from emphatic forms.
words  English  etymology  philology 
7 weeks ago by ahall
Oxford English Dictionary | Vancouver Public Library
The most comprehensive dictionary of the English language and the authority on the etymology of English words.
dictionary  english  etymology  oed  language 
7 weeks ago by ivar
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange
Q&A for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts
writing  english  forum  language  grammar  communication  discuss  etymology  2019 
8 weeks ago by dchesters
An Etymological Workout | Arrant Pedantry
Work comes from the Proto-Germanic *werkam, which in turn comes from the Proto-Indo-European *wérǵom, ultimately from the root *werǵ ‘to make’.
English  etymology  philology  words 
8 weeks ago by ahall

Copy this bookmark:





to read