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The paranoid fantasy behind Brexit | Fintan O'Toole | Politics | The Guardian
> the experience of not being invaded was one of the genuinely distinctive things about being British: “Our physical assets and our economy had suffered less disastrously than those of other western European countries as a result of the war: nor did we suffer the shock of invasion. We were thus less immediately conscious of the need for us to become part of the unity in Europe.”

This article is an excellent analysis of the bizarre mindset that plagues Britain, and which makes it so hostile to the idea of being part of Europe.
EU  brexit  europe  publishtoweb 
2 hours ago by sonniesedge
The paranoid fantasy behind Brexit | Fintan O'Toole | Politics | The Guardian
The long read: In the dark imagination of English reactionaries, Britain is always a defeated nation – and the EU is the imaginary invader
EU  europe  brexit  history  via:zesteur 
5 hours ago by nikgreen
How Brexit Britain lost friends and alienated people
A good summary. IMHO, Brexit became inevitable when Cameron withdrew Conservatives from EPP.
brexit  ukpolitics  eu 
5 hours ago by nwlinks
The paranoid fantasy behind Brexit | Fintan O'Toole | Politics | The Guardian
The long read: In the dark imagination of English reactionaries, Britain is always a defeated nation – and the EU is the imaginary invader
history  uk  war  D  EU  europe 
6 hours ago by zesteur
Brexit cannot be stopped
I am inclined to agree with @AndrewDuffEU.
eu  ukpolitics  brexit 
7 hours ago by nwlinks
Theresa May’s terrible Brexit deal has united the UK in horror | Financial Times
We need a path that avoids a brutal and damaging rupture with EU and its consequences
ft  uk  eu 
18 hours ago by robward
Brexit Analysis: Why Theresa May's Deal May Be Doomed - CityLab
Amid resignations, it's clear the U.K. government massively misjudged how leaving the European Union would play out.
eu 
19 hours ago by tonys
Decline and Fall: What Next for May’s Deal? | Novara Media
The third option is a general election. Without the fixed-term Act passed to shore up the Cameron-Clegg coalition, such an election would already be underway; it is the natural remedy for political impasse. An election allows not only a conversation about Brexit in narrow technical terms, but to put to the country the profoundly differing visions of the future which now exist between the two major parties, including a throughgoing rejection of Conservative economics, a rebalancing of the country’s disgorged financial sector, and an end to the punitive austerity of the past Tory administrations. Such an election would be difficult for Labour: it would require the party to clarify its Brexit plans beyond the six tests, in explicit propositional terms, and require a future Labour government to push for renegotiation under an extended Article 50, in order to rectify the mess and incompetence of the Tory negotiating team. This seems the best strategy for the left in Labour: it will require those active in the party to demand their MPs refuse Tory fear-mongering and the siren call of Soubry’s national government.

As we enter what looks like the endgame of May’s ministry, the sights of the left ought to be focused on the possibility of a transformational, socialist government. Behind the political churn, deep questions lurk: what sovereignty looks like in a globalised world, how to rectify the decades of wreckage inflicted by successive governments on this country and its working class, how to adequately tackle the planetary death spiral capitalism has locked us into. Only the left can answer those questions – and it now must.
UK  EU  Brexit  withdrawalAgreement  MayTheresa  ToryParty  politics  DUP  customsUnion  NorthernIreland  Scotland  SNP  LabourParty  stateAid  Parliament  leadership  1922Committee  BarnierMichel  GNU  SoubryAnna  referendum  generalElection  TheLeft  dctagged  dc:creator=ButlerJames 
20 hours ago by petej
One day we’ll wonder how these Brexit fanatics seized the nation | Polly Toynbee | Opinion | The Guardian
Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg are only paper tigers, says Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee
eu 
20 hours ago by tonys

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