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financial_journalism

I covered the City for 20 years — here’s what I learnt
March 8, 2019 | Financial Times | by Sarah Gordon |

Sarah Gordon says businesses must do more to improve their image and dispel widespread misconceptions
culture  farewells  finance  financial_journalism  leadership  lessons_learned  noughties  women 
march 2019 by jerryking
The Struggle Inside The Wall Street Journal
FEB. 14, 2017 | The New York Times | David Leonhardt.

The Journal’s newsroom is embroiled in a fight over the paper’s direction.

Many staff members believe that the paper’s top editor, Gerard Baker, previously a feisty conservative commentator, is trying to Murdoch-ize the paper. “There is a systemic issue,” one reporter told me. The dissatisfaction went public last week, with stories in Politico and the Huffington Post. At a staff meeting on Monday, Baker dismissed the criticism as “fake news,” Joe Pompeo and Hadas Gold of Politico reported.

As a longtime reader, admirer and competitor of The Journal, I think the internal critics are right. You can see the news pages becoming more politicized. You can also see The Journal’s staff pushing back, through both great journalism (including exposes on the Trump administration) and quiet insubordination.....The Journal’s opinion pages, of course, have long been conservative. And they have their own tensions: An editor critical of Trump was recently fired, The Atlantic reported. But The Journal’s news pages, like those of The New York Times, The Washington Post and elsewhere, have aspired to objectivity.

One way to understand the fight is through the lens of Fox News. Its former leader, Roger Ailes, knew that the country had become more polarized and that many viewers didn’t want sober objectivity. He also knew that most reporters leaned left, and their beliefs sometimes seeped into coverage.
WSJ  newspapers  Rupert_Murdoch  financial_journalism  biases  WaPo  internal_politics 
february 2017 by jerryking
Back to business
October 17/18, 2015 | FT| By Matthew Garrahan and Ben McLannahan
The party to celebrate Bloomberg Businessweek magazine's 85th anniversary took place under a 21,000lb fibreglass model of a blue whale...
Michael_Bloomberg  New_York_City  BusinessWeek  entrepreneur  financial_data  moguls  mayoral  Bloomberg  financial_journalism  from notes
november 2015 by jerryking
On the Market
1 March 2012 | n + 1 | Alice Gregory.

I knew little about. In my interview, I told my future boss that I had never been able to imagine an idea that could be best expressed by painting it. “But,” I added, making exaggerated eye contact, “appreciating art doesn’t mean you can send effective emails. I can write. I can make your job easier for you.” This is the best thing to say in an interview if you are young and unqualified to do anything other than maintain a personal blog. I started three weeks later.....financial journalist Felix Salmon asserted in response that “the entire business of the art world is built on opacity and information asymmetry.” Salmon continued, “One of the weird things about conspicuous consumption in the art world is that for all that it’s conspicuous it isn’t public—outside the big public museums everybody tends to be very secretive indeed about what they own and what they don’t.”.....
art  auctions  Sotheby's  opacity  asymmetrical  conspicuous_consumption  information_asymmetry  provenance  financial_journalism  Felix_Salmon 
may 2012 by jerryking
Document Page: RAMP Now Powers 6 of the Top 10 Financial Media Companies Online
Business Wire
03-15-2011
RAMP, the industry's leading Content Optimization platform for major
online media publishers, today announced that it now powers 6 of the top
10 financial media companies on the web, including CNBC,
ThomsonReuters, FoxBusiness, theStreet, Morningstar, & Dow Jones
Factiva. Financial media has continued to be one of the fastest growing
online media segments, RAMP's Content Optimization solutions drive
content discovery and engagement across video, audio, text and image
content and deliver immediate results for major media companies across
the Web."RAMP's focus on premium publishers continues to deliver success
for our company and our customers," said Tom Wilde, CEO of RAMP. "Tier
one media companies require solutions that can deliver scale,
automation, and cost effectiveness. RAMP's core IP combined with
expertise delivering best in class user experiences has made us the go
to partner for financial media publishers."
online  platforms  digital_media  financial_communications  financial_journalism 
may 2011 by jerryking
The Unwisdom of Crowds
12/22/2008 | The Weekly Standard Vol. 014, Issue 14 | by
Christopher Caldwell. Financial panics still require what Walter
Bagehot prescribed--that practical men violate their own principles.
Common sense is often not much use in a financial panic. This was the
great discovery of Walter Bagehot, the prolific 19th-century essayist
and journalist, who was editor of the Economist from 1860 to 1877. (His
name rhymes with gadget.) in the so-called Anglo-Saxon world, Bagehot's
book still provides the bedrock of policy thinking during financial
emergencies, including our present one.
bailouts  banking  banks  capitalism  economics  economy  finance  financial_crises  financial_history  financial_journalism  panics  policymaking  politicaleconomy  prolificacy  Walter_Bagehot 
october 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Reportage - A pugnacious pundit Wall Street can’t ignore
July 17 2009| Financial Times | By John Gapper. Profiles
Charlie Gasparino of CNBC. Instead of waiting for newspapers or wire
services to break stories and then getting a chief executive or an
analyst to comment, CNBC strove to produce scoops of its own – and hired
seasoned reporters to find them.
profile  financial_journalism  CNBC  Charles_Gasparino  journalists  scoops 
september 2009 by jerryking
Nouriel Roubini Says Nationalizing the Banks Is the Market-Friendly Solution - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 21, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | Interview of Nouriel
Roubini by TUNKU VARADARAJAN. Roubini believes that "The problem is that
in the bubble years, everyone becomes a cheerleader, including the
media. This is when journalists should be asking tough questions...
there was a failure there. More financial and business journalists, in
the good years, should have asked, 'Wait a moment, if this man, or this
firm, is making a 100% return a year, how do they do it? Is it because
they're smarter than everybody else . . . or because they're taking so
much risk they'll be bankrupt two years down the line?' In the bubble
years, no one asked the hard questions. A good journalist has to be one
who, in good times, challenges the conventional wisdom. If you don't do
that, you fail in one of your duties."
===============================================
a healthy dose of reality and skepticism is always a good idea.
economics  crisis  ECONOMY  finance  skepticism  nourielroubini  banking  recessions  bailouts  journalists  journalism  nationalizations  hard_questions  financial_journalism  5_W’s  questions 
february 2009 by jerryking
What if journalists had said nothing about the financial meltdown?
What if journalists had said nothing about the financial meltdown at the beginning of the crisis? Would it have alleviated the tail-spin into global collapse? The Guardian’s Peter Wilby has an intriguing example from relatively recent history that at least offers an alternative universe where the media was kept hushed:

“The papers keep telling us there has been nothing like this financial crisis since the 1930s. They are wrong. Something similar happened little more than 30 years ago. Newspaper readers, however, knew nothing about it. Then, as now, the banking sector was close to systemic failure. Then, as now, NatWest (part of the RBS group since 2000) was in dire straits. Then, as now, the Bank of England poured in public money. But the drama was almost entirely behind closed doors. NatWest simply denied it was in trouble, and it was believed. To this day, nobody knows for sure how much the crisis cost the taxpayer”

Peter does not think that the hacks should stay silent. He quotes in his support from one interviewee cited in the new Polis report on Finanical Journalism, (email us at polis@lse.ac.uk if you want a copy):

“Markets are basically corrupt … there is a large amount of insider information circulating, which people are trading on. And we … plug in those … deals and then publish … to everybody … We don’t think we have any … moral obligation to smooth the way … if you act as the smoothing, controlling influence you are doing that just on behalf of somebody else.”
Financial_journalism  from google
december 2008 by Memeserver

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