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Title Capitalization Tool - Capitalize My Title | Automatically capitalize your titles
Automatically capitalize your email subjects, essay, headline, and article titles.
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41 minutes ago by keimlink
Start Up: Goldilocks meets the iPhone, Google’s bad searches, awaiting AirPods 2, has pro-Trump media met its Vietnam?, and more | The Overspill: when there's more that I want to say
Apple plans upgrades to popular AirPods headphones • Bloomberg
Mark Gurman:
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The Cupertino, California-based technology giant is working on a new version for release as soon as this year with an upgraded wireless chip, the [unnamed] people said. A subsequent model for as early as next year is planned to be water resistant, they added, asking not to be identified discussing private product plans.
The model coming as early as this year will let people summon Apple’s Siri digital assistant without physically tapping the headphones by saying “Hey Siri.” The function will work similarly to how a user activates Siri on an iPhone or a HomePod speaker hands-free. The headphones, internally known as B288, will include an upgraded Apple-designed wireless chip for managing Bluetooth connections. The first AirPods include a chip known as the W1, and Apple released the W2 with the Apple Watch last year.
The idea for the water-resistant model is for the headphones to survive splashes of water and rain, the people said. They likely won’t be designed to be submerged in water.
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“Splashes of water”? Didn’t know they were subjected to that much. Note in passing all the fol-de-rol of formal American newswriting: the amazingly dull headline, the requirement to describe Apple as “the Cupertino-based technology giant”, in case you were trying to find them on a map; the inability to just say “my sources”; the strangulated “as soon as this year” instead of “perhaps this year”. It’s like a weird grammar of its own.
technology  news  grammar  style 
4 days ago by rgl7194
The weird grammar of American newswriting - Six Colors
In quoting Mark Gurman’s piece about AirPods yesterday, I noticed (and actually removed) some of the cruft that clogs his work now that he’s at Bloomberg and working with Bloomberg’s copy desk. I didn’t mention it, but Charles Arthur did, and his take is delightful:
Note in passing all the fol-de-rol of formal American newswriting: the amazingly dull headline, the requirement to describe Apple as “the Cupertino-based technology giant”, in case you were trying to find them on a map; the inability to just say “my sources”; the strangulated “as soon as this year” instead of “perhaps this year”. It’s like a weird grammar of its own.
Gurman’s writing was far clearer when he was at 9to5 Mac. But at Bloomberg he’s subject to its stylebook. Apparently Bloomberg requires a boilerplate mention of a company’s hometown so you don’t confuse the world’s largest technology firm with a local apple-picking farm. The Bloomberg style quirk that always gets me is the construction “the people,” which is how Bloomberg likes to refer to anonymous sources (“people familiar with the matter”) after they’ve been introduced. To quote the AirPods story:
The Cupertino, California-based technology giant is working on a new version for release as soon as this year with an upgraded wireless chip, the people said.
Style guides get infested with bizarre quirks not because a sadistic copy editor likes messing with writers and readers alike, but because providing clarity and consistency across a large news organization is a good idea. But over time, the original reasons some rules were created will vanish over the horizon, leaving nothing but a rule to be followed because Rules Are Made To Be Followed. Even if the result is, as Arthur says, “fol-de-rol.”
Anyway, Mark Gurman’s an excellent reporter. No matter what “the people” said.
technology  news  grammar  style 
4 days ago by rgl7194
Decorate, diagram
Does anyone still diagram sentences Reed-Kellogg style?
comics  grammar  Peanuts  sentences 
7 days ago by M.Leddy
Land's End's Apostrophe
In the US, a board established in 1890 has the final say on the naming of geographical areas, and has only allowed five places to use the possessive apostrophe.

Martha's Vineyard, in Massachusetts, and Ike's Point in New Jersey, are two of those allowed to officially use the apostrophe.

In London, Earl's Court tube station has the apostrophe, but the now-closed exhibition centre do not. The area was once owned by the earls of Oxford.

But Barons Court does not have the mark, as the region's name is made up and was never owned by royalty.
grammar  geography 
9 days ago by xianoforange
Japanese Verbs te-form - Free Japanese Lessons
As you will see, て-form (te-form) of Japanese verbs has many functions. You can use it to form different verb sentences. One basic function of te-form is to connect verb sentences.
grammar  japanese  language 
10 days ago by kogakure
When and How to Use the Japanese Verb Form "Te"
The ~ te form is a useful form of the Japanese verb. It does not indicate tense by itself, however it combines with other verb forms to create other tenses. It has many other uses as well.
grammar  japanese  language 
10 days ago by kogakure
Other uses of the te-form – Learn Japanese
The te-form is incredibly useful as it is used widely in many different types of grammatical expressions. We will learn about enduring states with the 「~ている」 and 「~てある」 form. Even though we have learned various conjugations for verbs, they have all been one-time actions.
grammar  japanese  language 
10 days ago by kogakure

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