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The NRA's latest budget cut: the office coffee — Quartz at Work
It turns out the cutback is merely the latest piece of evidence that the NRA is short on cash. In what gun-regulation advocates will read as a hopeful sign, membership fees were reportedly down by $35 million in 2017, and total assets dropped from $217 million to $196 million.
NRA  guns  guncontrol  decline  revenues  Quartz  2018 
4 hours ago by inspiral
Mr. Rogers's "Look for the Helpers” Is Bad for Adults - The Atlantic
We were entrusted with these insights to make children’s lives better, not to comfort ourselves for having failed to fashion the adult world in which they must live.
MrRogers  GunControl  Grief 
22 days ago by LauraJane
Being an activist
Parkland survivor Emma Gonzales with powerful words
activism  politics  guncontrol 
6 weeks ago by nelson
Matt Deitsch on Twitter: "Look at this picture. Fred Guttenberg, whose daughter was slaughtered by a man who legally owned an AR-15, extends his hand...
Look at this picture. Fred Guttenberg, whose daughter was slaughtered by a man who legally owned an AR-15, extends his hand to a man who could decide the fate of countless lives. Fred introduces himself. Kavanaugh listens, nods, snubs the handshake, walks away without a word.
twitter  politics  photo  mattdeitsch  @mattxred  fredguttenberg  guncontrol  brettkavanaugh  from twitter_favs
9 weeks ago by coslinks
Offering a more progressive definition of freedom
"Pete Buttigieg is the mayor of South Bend, Indiana. He is a progressive Democrat, Rhodes scholar, served a tour of duty in Afghanistan during his time as mayor, and is openly gay. In a recent interview with Rolling Stone [https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/pete_buttigieg-36-year-old-mayor-south-bend-indiana-2020-713662/ ], Buttigieg talked about the need for progressives to recast concepts that conservatives have traditionally “owned” — like freedom, family, and patriotism — in more progressive terms.
You’ll hear me talk all the time about freedom. Because I think there is a failure on our side if we allow conservatives to monopolize the idea of freedom — especially now that they’ve produced an authoritarian president. But what actually gives people freedom in their lives? The most profound freedoms of my everyday existence have been safeguarded by progressive policies, mostly. The freedom to marry who I choose, for one, but also the freedom that comes with paved roads and stop lights. Freedom from some obscure regulation is so much more abstract. But that’s the freedom that conservatism has now come down to.

Or think about the idea of family, in the context of everyday life. It’s one thing to talk about family values as a theme, or a wedge — but what’s it actually like to have a family? Your family does better if you get a fair wage, if there’s good public education, if there’s good health care when you need it. These things intuitively make sense, but we’re out of practice talking about them.

I also think we need to talk about a different kind of patriotism: a fidelity to American greatness in its truest sense. You think about this as a local official, of course, but a truly great country is made of great communities. What makes a country great isn’t chauvinism. It’s the kinds of lives you enable people to lead. I think about wastewater management as freedom. If a resident of our city doesn’t have to give it a second thought, she’s freer.


Clean drinking water is freedom. Good public education is freedom. Universal healthcare is freedom. Fair wages are freedom. Policing by consent is freedom. Gun control is freedom. Fighting climate change is freedom. A non-punitive criminal justice system is freedom. Affirmative action is freedom. Decriminalizing poverty is freedom. Easy & secure voting is freedom. This is an idea of freedom I can get behind."
petebuttigieg  freedom  democracy  2018  jasonkottke  everyday  life  living  progressive  progress  progressivism  education  water  healthcare  universalhealthcare  health  climatechange  politics  policy  poverty  inequality  decriminalization  voting  affirmitiveaction  guncontrol  liberation  work  labor  salaries  wages  economics  socialism  policing  police  lawenforcement  consent  patriotism  wealth  family 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
ACS Advocates a Consensus Strategy to Prevent Injury, Disability, and Death from Firearms
The ACS COT’s Consensus Strategy views firearm injury and mortality in the larger context of violence toward oneself or others, which is a major cause of unnecessary injury and death in the United States, claiming on average 175 American lives every single day.*

“To reduce death and disability associated with firearm injuries, we have to think about the strategies that cover the entire spectrum of violence-related events: how firearms are stored in the home, recognition that people who are at risk of self-harm or domestic violence should not have access to weapons, and addressing the causes of interpersonal violence. These strategies don’t get a lot of attention. These are not controversial ideas. All are achievable and could make a huge impact in terms of reducing injury, disability, and death,” said Eileen M. Bulger, MD, FACS, Seattle, Wash., current ACS COT Chair.
Violent Intentional Injuries and Deaths Are a Neglected Public Health Crisis

In 2016, the most recent year for which data are available, a firearm was involved in 51 percent (22,938) of suicides and 75 percent (14,415) of homicides. Since 1999 there has been a 17 percent increase in firearm-related intentional injury death rates; over the same time period, there was a 22 percent decrease in traffic-related deaths.*

Since 2014, the ACS COT has been engaged in a firearm-injury prevention consensus-building project that involved surveys of its members and the ACS Board of Regents and Board of Governors, town hall meetings, and outreach to a broad group of stakeholder organizations.
us  politics  deaths  guncontrol  medicine  healthcare  health 
10 weeks ago by juliusbeezer

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