recentpopularlog in

hamming

« earlier   
Learning to Learn
The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn" was the capstone course by Dr. Richard W. Hamming (1915-1998) for graduate students at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, California.
hamming  youtube  learning  science  engineering 
6 days ago by drmeme
[1710.06993] Improved Search in Hamming Space using Deep Multi-Index Hashing
"Similarity-preserving hashing is a widely-used method for nearest neighbour search in large-scale image retrieval tasks. There has been considerable research on generating efficient image representation via the deep-network-based hashing methods. However, the issue of efficient searching in the deep representation space remains largely unsolved. To this end, we propose a simple yet efficient deep-network-based multi-index hashing method for simultaneously learning the powerful image representation and the efficient searching. To achieve these two goals, we introduce the multi-index hashing (MIH) mechanism into the proposed deep architecture, which divides the binary codes into multiple substrings. Due to the non-uniformly distributed codes will result in inefficiency searching, we add the two balanced constraints at feature-level and instance-level, respectively. Extensive evaluations on several benchmark image retrieval datasets show that the learned balanced binary codes bring dramatic speedups and achieve comparable performance over the existing baselines."
papers  hashing  search  hamming  via:vaguery 
november 2017 by arsyed
6.896: Essential Coding Theory
- probabilistic method and Chernoff bound for Shannon coding
- probabilistic method for asymptotically good Hamming codes (Gilbert coding)
- sparsity used for LDPC codes
mit  course  yoga  tcs  complexity  coding-theory  math.AG  fields  polynomials  pigeonhole-markov  linear-algebra  probabilistic-method  lecture-notes  bits  sparsity  concentration-of-measure  linear-programming  linearity  expanders  hamming  pseudorandomness  crypto  rigorous-crypto  communication-complexity  no-go  madhu-sudan  shannon  unit  p:** 
february 2017 by nhaliday
What is the relationship between information theory and Coding theory? - Quora
basically:
- finite vs. asymptotic
- combinatorial vs. probabilistic (lotsa overlap their)
- worst-case (Hamming) vs. distributional (Shannon)

Information and coding theory most often appear together in the subject of error correction over noisy channels. Historically, they were born at almost exactly the same time - both Richard Hamming and Claude Shannon were working at Bell Labs when this happened. Information theory tends to heavily use tools from probability theory (together with an "asymptotic" way of thinking about the world), while traditional "algebraic" coding theory tends to employ mathematics that are much more finite sequence length/combinatorial in nature, including linear algebra over Galois Fields. The emergence in the late 90s and first decade of 2000 of codes over graphs blurred this distinction though, as code classes such as low density parity check codes employ both asymptotic analysis and random code selection techniques which have counterparts in information theory.

They do not subsume each other. Information theory touches on many other aspects that coding theory does not, and vice-versa. Information theory also touches on compression (lossy & lossless), statistics (e.g. large deviations), modeling (e.g. Minimum Description Length). Coding theory pays a lot of attention to sphere packing and coverings for finite length sequences - information theory addresses these problems (channel & lossy source coding) only in an asymptotic/approximate sense.
q-n-a  qra  math  acm  tcs  information-theory  coding-theory  big-picture  comparison  confusion  explanation  linear-algebra  polynomials  limits  finiteness  math.CO  hi-order-bits  synthesis  probability  bits  hamming  shannon  intricacy  nibble  s:null  signal-noise 
february 2017 by nhaliday
Richard Hamming: "Learning to Learn" - YouTube
The Art of Doing Science and Engineering: Learning to Learn" was the capstone course by Dr. Richard W. Hamming (1915-1998) for graduate students at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey, California.
video  lecture  science  learning  hamming  richard  learn 
december 2016 by cstanhope
You and Your Research
"At a seminar in the Bell Communications Research Colloquia Series, Dr. Richard W. Hamming, a Professor at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California and a retired Bell Labs scientist, gave a very interesting and stimulating talk, `You and Your Research' to an overflow audience of some 200 Bellcore staff members and visitors at the Morris Research and Engineering Center on March 7, 1986. This talk centered on Hamming's observations and research on the question ``Why do so few scientists make significant contributions and so many are forgotten in the long run?'' From his more than forty years of experience, thirty of which were at Bell Laboratories, he has made a number of direct observations, asked very pointed questions of scientists about what, how, and why they did things, studied the lives of great scientists and great contributions, and has done introspection and studied theories of creativity. The talk is about what he has learned in terms of the properties of the individual scientists, their abilities, traits, working habits, attitudes, and philosophy."
hamming  research 
june 2016 by lucastheis

Copy this bookmark:





to read