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The Real Job Creators: Why America should glorify entrepreneurs less and managers more. - Slate Magazine
By Esther Dyson|Posted Friday, Nov. 18, 2011,

a man who arrives in a village with what he claims is a magic stone. Put the stone into a pot of water over a fire, he says, add a just few ingredients—some vegetables, some old ham bones, a few spices—and soon you will have a delicious, life-giving soup with magical healing properties.

In this folk tale, the man is a trickster: The point of the story is that his magic stone is just a plain old rock. To modern eyes, however, this man is an entrepreneur. His “magic stone” is perhaps the germ of an idea, a product concept, or a marketing innovation. The entrepreneur takes the stone and adds ingredients (commodities or software), attracts people, gets them to work together, and perhaps tosses in a pinch of branding. The result is value where before there were only unexploited resources.

But that is only the beginning of the story. In the long run, the entrepreneur’s job is not to make soup, but to create a restaurant—or, better yet, a chain of restaurants—so that the magic soup can be made reliably, day after day, by a team that can work on its own without the impresario’s direction. Over time, the company will continue to evolve, improving the soup, adding other items to the menu and opening up restaurants in new markets....We can argue about the value of education, but large companies are good at offering practical business skills—turning college graduates into project managers, marketers, human-resources specialists, and the like. These jobs may not generate revenues directly, but they are part of the structure that enables people to run companies effectively and benefit from economies of scale.
college-educated  economies_of_scale  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  e-Myth  Esther_Dyson  impresarios  job_creation  large_companies  management  storytelling  unexploited_resources  value_creation 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Branding of Damien Hirst
Spring 2008 |SIR|by Pernilla Holmes. Damien Hirst, 42, may be
the world’s richest artist. While most of his money comes from the sale
of artwork, he finds ways to turn his artistic reputation &
notoriety into successful sidelines. His company, Other Criteria,
licenses his imagery, creates products, & sells them on the Web. In
addition to Hirst’s own prints, editions, books, posters, &
T-shirts, the company mkts. the wares of other artists. This is just 1
piece of an umbrella corp., Science Ltd., that oversees Hirst’s studios,
120 employees, & other business interests...Over the yrs. those
have included a popular London restaurant; backing musicians &
artists, a restored inn in North Devon; a widely shown art collection;
& plans for museum & gallery spaces...Hirst has a line of
clothing that's part of the Warhol Factory X Levi’s label from Levi
Strauss—he's become a global brand...The result is a steady
rev.stream...Hirst’s fortune will soon surpass £200 million ($400
million).
artists  digital_artifacts  personal_branding  entrepreneur  business_interests  brands  impresarios  art  back-house_opportunities  Damien_Hirst  side_hustles 
september 2011 by jerryking
The State of Jay-Z's Empire - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 22, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JOHN JURGENSEN,
He's worth an estimated $450 million and hobnobs with Bill Gates and
Warren Buffett. How the Brooklyn-born performer has become the leading
music impresario of his generation.
Jay-Z  moguls  Live_Nation  music_industry  branding  partnerships  celebrities  impresarios 
october 2010 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - His BamBoo club transformed the nightlife of restrained Toronto
Oct. 27, 2007 obituary to Richard O'Brien, the entertainment
impresario who co-founded the Bamboo Club at 312 Queen St. W. Toronto
inspiration  obituaries  entertainment  impresarios  nightlife 
january 2009 by jerryking

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