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Another ten years later • The ISP Column
Geoff Huston reflects on the changes - and non-changes - of internet infrastructure over the past ten years:
<p>The most notable aspect of the network that appears to stubbornly resist all forms of pressure over the last decade, including some harsh realities of acute scarcity, is the observation that we are still running what is essentially an IPv4 Internet.

Over this past decade we have exhausted our pools of remaining IPv4 addresses, and in most parts of the world the IPv4 Internet is running on some form of empty. We had never suspected that the Internet would confront the exhaustion of one its most fundamental pillars, the basic function of uniquely addressing connected devices, and apparently shrug it off and continue on blithely. But, unexpectedly, that’s exactly what’s happened.

Today we estimate that some 3.4 billion people are regular users of the Internet, and there are some 20 billion devices connected to it. We have achieved this using some 3 billion unique IPv4 addresses. Nobody thought that we could achieve this astonishing feat, yet it has happened with almost no fanfare.

Back in the 1900’s we had thought that the prospect of address exhaustion would propel the Internet to use IPv6. This was the successor IP protocol that comes with a four-fold increase in the bit width of IP addresses. By increasing the IP address pool to some esoterically large number of unique addresses (340 undecillion addresses, or 3.4 x 1038) we would never have to confront network address exhaustion again. But this was not going to be an easy transition. There is no backward compatibility in this protocol transition, so everything has to change. Every device, every router and even every application needs to change to support IPv6. Rather than perform comprehensive protocol surgery on the Internet and change every part of the infrastructure to support IPv6, we changed the basic architecture of the Internet instead. Oddly enough, it looks like this was the cheaper option!</p>


Yeah, one tends to forget this. "<a href="https://www.networkworld.com/article/2985340/ipv6/arin-finally-runs-out-of-ipv4-addresses.html">IPv4 exhaustion</a>" stories were all over the place a couple of years back. Now? Nothing.
internet  ipv4 
20 days ago by charlesarthur
Force Apt-Get to IPv4 or IPv6 on Ubuntu or Debian - Vultr.com
To make the setting persistent, create the file 99force-ipv4 in /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/.

sudoedit /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/99force-ipv4

Put the following contents in it:

Acquire::ForceIPv4 "true"
debian  apt  linux  sysadmin  ipv4  ipv6 
5 weeks ago by exnihilo
keiichishima/yacryptopan
'Yet another Crypto-PAn implementation for Python':
This package provides a function to anonymize IP addresses keeping their prefix consistency. This program is based on the paper "Prefix-Preserving IP Address Anonymization: Measurement-based Security Evaluation and a New Cryptography-based Scheme" written by Jun Xu, Jinliang Fan, Mostafa H. Ammar, and Sue B. Moon. The detailed explanation can be found in [Xu2002]. This package supports both IPv4 and IPv6 anonymization.


(via Alexandre Dulaunoy)
via:adulau  anonymization  ip-addresses  internet  ipv4  ipv6  security  crypto  python  crypto-pan 
11 weeks ago by jm

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