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FPAs: Moving Parts Still Have the Upper Hand - NSR Apr 2019
"Given the number of Non-GEO HTS constellations announced, from early "launch, full production, and those in early development, it is safe to say the skies will be filling up fast with more satellite capacity than ever before. On the ground, development of next-generation, electronically-steered terminals continues with announcements such by Kymeta, Phasor, and OmniAccess among others. Given this, all signs indicate that electronically-steered antennas (ESAs), which will inherently decrease the number of moving parts, are key to the future of satcom. However, delays are quite common, from Kymeta requiring 5 years to ship their first product, and Phasor postponing their ESA deployment, to name just a few.

Meanwhile, mechanically-steered antennas (MSAs) are on the market now, with developed supply chains and partnerships, doing the job with a host of moving parts."

"According to NSR’s Flat Panel Satellite Antennas, 4th Edition, annual shipments of mechanically-steered antennas (MSA) FPAs will grow to over 48,000 units by 2028, with over 7,000 shipped last year. MSAs are forecasted to represent only 3% of all future shipped FPAs, yet they represent 95% of the market today. In fact, despite ESA development, MSAs are expected to retain leadership in key verticals."

"Advanced capabilities are desired, but reliability is required."
NSR  satellite  antennas  Kymeta  Phasor  market-research  ESA 
april 2019 by pierredv
Satellite antenna companies divided on near-term feasibility of cheap flat panels - SpaceNews.com Oct 2018
"Builders of satellite antennas disagree on whether flat panel antennas — widely considered a necessity for planned broadband megaconstellations — can be produced cheaply enough to address the mass consumer market in the near term. Antenna makers say so much enthusiasm exists for such antennas that sorting fact from wishful thinking among buyer expectations and seller claims has become a difficulty all its own. "

"“We’ve all heard the crazy requests from some operators asking for millions of antennas for multiple hundreds of dollars,” said Drew Klein, director of international business development at C-Com Satellite Systems, a company that builds dish antennas and is working on a flat panel antenna with the University of Waterloo. Such prices are achievable “within the next decade” — and have to be, he said, in order to address new markets. "

"Some antenna companies, like Israel-based Gilat Satellite Networks, are focused first on building flat panel antennas for customers who are willing to pay higher prices than consumers. "

“I think we are a long ways away from seeing a consumer flat panel antenna in the couple-of-hundred-dollars price point, which is where it needs to be to compete with consumer terminals that we have today for [high-throughput] satellites,” said Andre Jones

"In the absence of commercial flat panel antennas, SES has been forced to rely on two dish antenna systems with mechanical steering to keep constant links with O3b satellites in 8,000-kilometer medium Earth orbits, but this approach is very expensive. "

"John Finney, Isotropic CEO, said his company is making progress on an antenna designed to fit within a $300 to $700 price range stipulated by OneWeb"

"Kymeta antennas are priced up to $39,000 today, though the company plans to drive those prices down to below $1,000 through volume."
satellite  antennas  SpaceNews  Phasor  SES  O3b  Kymeta  Isotropic  AvL  Gilat  C-Com 
october 2018 by pierredv
German startup takes Kymeta-like LCD approach to flat panel antenna manufacturing - SpaceNews.com May 2018
"Backed by fleet operator SES, the German science and technology conglomerate Merck Group and the Beijing Singularity Power Investment Fund, Alcan Systems of Darmstadt, Germany, is nearing completion of a phased array antenna for satellite broadband links. "

"Alcan Systems, whose name stands for “Adaptive Liquid Crystal ANtenna,” is designing modular antennas to bring internet to mobile platforms (cars, planes, boats, and other vehicles), business networks and consumer broadband service — target markets for high-throughput satellites in any orbit. "

"Sibay said the company is aiming for prices “for the enterprise version under 10,000 euros and for the consumer version under 1,000 euros.” Each electronically steered antenna should reach throughputs of 250 Mbps, and have switching speeds between satellites of 5 milliseconds, he said."

"The fundamental difference between the two antennas is that Kymeta’s is based on a metamaterial it describes as “a glass structure similar to a liquid crystal display.” Alcan Systems’ product is a phased array antenna that uses liquid crystals in lieu of traditional semiconductor technology. Kymeta’s antenna is also designed to work with Ku-band satellites, while Alcan Systems is simultaneously creating antennas for Ku- and Ka-band systems. "
SpaceNews  antennas  Germany  satellite  Kymeta  Alcan 
may 2018 by pierredv
Kymeta CEO on the Future of the Mobile Communications Market - Via Satellite - Mar 2017
"Kymeta plans to tackle both the issues of limited coverage and capacity in the mobile space with its long-awaited mTenna product line, which the company intends to release this coming May. Nathan Kundtz, chief executive officer of Kymeta, also told Via Satellite that the company plans to go one step further by partnering with Intelsat to introduce Kalo, a suite of network services supporting the satellite antenna."
ViaSatellite  Kymeta  satellite  antennas  Intelsat 
may 2018 by pierredv
LEO and MEO broadband constellations mega source of consternation - SpaceNews.com Mar 2018
"the rush to HTS is driving down bandwidth prices so fast that some fairly low-mileage satellites are struggling to keep up."

“At the moment there is a potential scramble for who is going to be the third player between Telesat, LeoSat and SpaceX,” said Farrar. “It’s probably going to be clear in the next 12 months which of those is out ahead.”

"Perhaps the biggest variable in calculating demand is figuring out what consumers will have to pay for the user terminal—the receiver and antennas customers will use to connect to the constellation."

"Farrar is among analysts who doubt consumer broadband will be the biggest application for LEO constellations. Bridging the digital divide is a laudable goal, but backhaul — using satellites to help cellular networks to increase coverage and improve service — is an early market they can dominate with or without cheap antennas."
SpaceNews  NGSO  LEO  MEO  GEO  HTS  broadband  satellite  Tim-Farrar  Armand-Musey  NSR  antennas  Kymeta  Phasor  commerce  trends 
march 2018 by pierredv
Kymeta breaks ranks with satellite, pushes for combination of satellite, terrestrial in 5G | FierceWireless Mar 2018
"Last week marked Kymeta’s first year renting meeting space at Mobile World Congress, and it had a big message to tell. It’s broken ranks with the satellite industry and jumped headfirst into supporting terrestrial wireless, with a caveat: The industry needs to work out a way to accommodate both these often adversarial technologies in 5G."
Kymeta  satellite  5G  antennas 
march 2018 by pierredv
Antenna Technologies for the Future | 2018-01-15 | Microwave Journal
"Traditional antenna technology has hit its limits in many demanding commercial and aerospace markets such as 5G, SATCOM, IoT and radar. But there are many companies developing new approaches and materials that could drastically improve antenna performance and enable new applications that were not previously envisioned because of these limitations. In this article, Microwave Journal looks at a sampling of these technologies that have come to our attention in the last couple of years."

topics
= 3D printed antennas (Optisys)
= metamaterial based antennas (e.g. Kymeta, Echodyne)
= fractal based antennas (Fractus)
MicrowaveJournal  review  antennas  Kymeta  Echodyne  Optisys  Fractus 
february 2018 by pierredv
Kymeta gets OK to start beaming internet through 11K flat panel antenna terminals | FierceWireless
"The Redmond, Washington-based company just finished a project with the Greenville, South Carolina, police department featuring its satellite-connected car during the eclipse, and now it’s announcing that it has received blanket authorization from the FCC for commercial distribution of 11,000 of its KyWay terminals in the United States.

The FCC’s blanket license will allow Kymeta to operate 5,000 vehicle-mounted Earth stations (VMEs), 5,000 fixed IoT installations and 1,000 maritime Earth stations on vessels (ESVs)."

"The company’s mTenna uses software-driven, tunable metamaterial elements to holographically create a beam that can be electronically steered to follow a satellite, meaning it can stay connected even while moving. "
FierceWireless  Kymeta  satellite  antennas  mmWave 
september 2017 by pierredv
The CIA is Investing in Firms That Mine Your Tweets and Instagram Photos
Soft robots that can grasp delicate objects, computer algorithms designed to spot an “insider threat,” and artificial intelligence that will sift through large data sets — these are just a few of the technologies being pursued by companies with investment from In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture capital firm, according to a document obtained by The Intercept.

Yet among the 38 previously undisclosed companies receiving In-Q-Tel funding, the research focus that stands out is social media mining and surveillance; the portfolio document lists several tech companies pursuing work in this area, including Dataminr, Geofeedia, PATHAR, and TransVoyant.
cia  inqtel  socialmedia  monitoring  intelligence  company  aquifi  beartooth  cliqr  cloudpassage  databricks  dataminr  docker  echodyne  epiqsolutions  geofeedia  gotenna  headspin  interset  keyssa  kymeta  lookout  mapbox  mesosphere  nervana  orbitalinsight  orionlabs  parallelwireless  pathar  pneubotics  psikick  pubnub  rocketlab  skincentialsciences  softrobotics  sonatype  spaceflightindustries  threatstream  timbr.io  transientelectronics  transvoyant  trxsystems  voltaiq  zoomdata  2016 
april 2016 by Frontrunner

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