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History of Symbolics lisp machines
Richard Stallman has been telling a story about the origins of the Lisp machine companies, and the effects on the M.I.T. Artificial Intelligence Lab, for many years. He has published it in a book, and in a widely-referenced paper, which you can find at http://www.gnu.org/gnu/rms-lisp.html.

His account is highly biased, and in many places just plain wrong. Here’s my own perspective on what really happened.

Richard Greenblatt’s proposal for a Lisp machine company had two premises. First, there should be no outside investment. This would have been totally unrealistic: a company manufacturing computer hardware needs capital. Second, Greenblatt himself would be the CEO. The other members of the Lisp machine project were extremely dubious of Greenblatt’s ability to run a company. So Greenblatt and the others went their separate ways and set up two companies.

Stallman’s characterization of this as “backstabbing”, and that Symbolics decided not “not have scruples”, is pure hogwash. There was no backstabbing whatsoever. Symbolics was extremely scrupulous. Stallman’s characterization of Symbolics as “looking for ways to destroy” LMI is pure fantasy.
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yesterday by kmt
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RT : what's more stupid? writing fizzbuzz or writing a new control structure for it? 🤔
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5 days ago by briantrice
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I have his book: Lore: A Guide to Programming the LISP Machine, Bromley/Lamson 😀
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6 days ago by briantrice
LISP Lore: A Guide to Programming the LISP Machine | H. Bromley | Springer
I have his book: Lore: A Guide to Programming the LISP Machine, Bromley/Lamson 😀
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6 days ago by briantrice

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