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Ask HN: Which books teach mental models? | Hacker News
I'm not convinced this is the right question to ask, but I love the reading list that develops in this thread.
systems  books  philosophy  readinglist  mentalmodels 
10 days ago by laurenpressley
Mental Models: The Best Way to Make Intelligent Decisions (109 Models Explained)
The smartest people in the world use mental models to make intelligent decisions, avoid stupidity, and increase productivity. Let's take a look at how ...
learning  models  thinking  knowledge  mentalmodels  psychology  IFTTT  mental  mental-models  advice 
11 days ago by ohnice
What’s Wrong with Dot Voting Exercises – Medium
"Bad for pace layered priorities

“Let’s fix the UI. The UI is terrible.” But what if beneath these user interface frustrations is the real behemoth — the underlying tech structure that really needs to be fixed first. And if everyone understood this, then they’d also understand that fixing the user interface issues now would be throwaway work when the foundation is eventually repaired. But everyone sees the visible problem, and cares about the visible problem, so the visible problem is what gets voted on.

Years ago, I started thinking about product and feature prioritization through the lens of pace layering. For the uninitiated, ‘pace layering’ is essentially a way to discuss different layers in a system, and how each layer changes at a different pace, from the fastest layers to the slowest layers in the system. Pace layering is often shown like this:

“Pace Layers” diagram from Stewart Brand. See: https://jods.mitpress.mit.edu/pub/issue3-brand
Pace layering is also explained using a house metaphor, where rearranging furniture (changing “Stuff”) is far easier than adding an extra bedroom (changing the “Structure”).

This metaphor is especially relevant for software design, where we have technology stacks and deep — and slow changing — layers of infrastructure sitting behind things that are far easier to change. Editing a misspelled word is far easier to change the the underling technical architecture everyone has committed to. If we think of user interface changes through this lens, it’s a good way to prioritize things according to where they sit in the stack."
design  thinking  mentalmodels  pacelayers  dotvoting  decisionmaking  voting  2019  stephenanderson  via:lukeneff 
25 days ago by robertogreco

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