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Sun to Sun - togina - Captain America (Movies) [Archive of Our Own]
"There is but one and only one whose love will fail you never. One who lives from sun to sun with constant fond endeavor."
fic  Marvel  CaptainAmerica  movieverse  SarahRogers  SteveRogers  BuckyBarnes  Bucky/Steve  togina  mundane  magic  AU 
24 days ago by adanska
The Silver Answer - dirtybinary - Captain America (Movies) [Archive of Our Own]
On May 7, 2013, the sixty-eighth anniversary of Steve Rogers’s death, the war record of the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops was declassified. Overnight, their work in World War II became public knowledge: a “Ghost Army” that deceived and terrorised Axis forces with phantom troops, decoy inflatables, spoofed radio signals, professionally recorded sound effects—and the myth of Captain America himself.

Steve Rogers never got the serum. He doesn't have superhuman abilities. What he has is a paint...
fic  Marvel  CaptainAmerica  movieverse  SteveRogers  BuckyBarnes  Bucky/Steve  outsiderpov  epistolary  dirtybinary  mundane  AU  !  !!  !!! 
24 days ago by adanska
Long Road Home - Sholio - Stargate Atlantis [Archive of Our Own]
You can run to the ends of the Earth, but you can't escape from yourself.
An undocumented immigrant, an emotionally and physically damaged veteran, and a border patrol agent who hates his job ... maybe they were destined to be friends in any universe.
fic  StarGate  SGA  Teyla  Sheppard  McKay  Ronon  Sholio  mundane  AU 
11 weeks ago by adanska
banausic - Wiktionary
WOTD – 18 January 2019 Etymology Edit From Ancient Greek βαναυσικός ( banausikós , “ of or for mechanics ” ) , from βάναυσος ( bánausos , “ mechanical;…
dictionary  etymology  language  banausic  technical  mechanical  utilitarian  mundane 
11 weeks ago by asaltydog
The Mundane Afrofuturist Manifesto | KCET
"Artbound" profiles five emerging artists whose work explores the intersection of race, class, identity, and aesthetics.
mundane  afro-futurist  Manifesto 
june 2019 by thejaymo
Karl Ove Knausgård on Literary Freedom (Ep. 66) – Conversations with Tyler – Medium
"
I’ve been kind of confronted with that as a writer, and I think everyone does because writing is so time consuming and so demanding. When I got children, I had this idea that writing was a solitary thing. I could go out to small islands in the sea. I could go to lighthouses, live there, try to write in complete . . . be completely solitary and alone. When I got children, that was an obstruction for my writing, I thought.

But it wasn’t. It was the other way around. I’ve never written as much as I have after I got the children, after I started to write at home, after I kind of established writing in the middle of life. It was crawling with life everywhere. And what happened was that writing became less important. It became less precious. It became more ordinary. It became less religious or less sacred.

t became something ordinary, and that was incredibly important for me because that was eventually where I wanted to go — into the ordinary and mundane, even, and try to connect to what was going on in life. Life isn’t sacred. Life isn’t uplifted. It is ordinary and boring and all the things, we know.

You have these myths, and they work for some. They don’t work for some, but you can relate to them...

Yeah, you just have to accept them and work inside of them. That’s the only way. If you can’t write, then you have to start right out from that fact.

I think that’s the best advice I ever got — to accept everything that happens. So if you have many children, it’s a good thing. If you don’t have children, it’s a good thing. You have to embrace it because that’s your life. That’s where you are, and writing should be connected to that — or painting or whatever it is.
"
karl-ove-knausgaard  tyler-cowen  podcasts  art  writing  kids  life  mundane  ordinary 
may 2019 by actualitems
Regret-stergram – DHH – Medium
Chasing affection from people I mostly didn’t know, so I could please an ego that vowed not to care.

...

But it didn’t take long for the feelings to become mixed. While I was sharing beautiful pictures of beautiful things, it clearly wasn’t the whole story. I didn’t share many of the most beautiful discoveries or memories I was making writing software, reading philosophy, or building community. And I most certainly didn’t share any of the mundane or the hard or the tragic or the heartbreak. It was all visual pleasures.
mundane  tragic  hard  heartbreak  ego  regret  instagram  facebook  social  media  cycle  consumption  contribution  dhh 
november 2018 by bekishore
Why is anyone listening to Tim O’Reilly?
If you’ve lost your job, and can’t find another one, or were never able to find steady full time employment in the first place between automation, outsourcing, and strings of financial meltdowns, Tim O’Reilly wants you to know you shouldn’t be mad. If you’ve been driven into the exploitative arms of the gig economy because the jobs you have been able to find don’t pay a living wage, Tim O’Reilly wants you to know this is a great opportunity. If ever you find yourself being evicted from an apartment you can’t afford because Airbnb has fatally distorted the rental economy in your city, wondering how you’ll pay for the health care you need and the food you need and the student loans you carry with your miscellaneous collection of gigs and jobs and plasma donations, feeling like you’re part of a generational sacrifice zone, Tim O’Reilly wants you to know that it will be worth it, someday, for someone, a long time from now, somewhere in the future.
book-review  politics  silicon-valley  tim-oreilly  economics  capitalism  limits  mundane  WTF  2017 
october 2017 by zzkt
The Seattle Review of Books - Here is a movie to remind you why you love reading and writing
"A lot of great movies adapted from written works have been released over the last month or so. Silence is a complex and challenging and ultimately rewarding adaptation of Shusaku Endo’s novel about the demands and responsibilities of faith. Fences is one of the most harrowing family dramas I’ve seen in years, with career-best performances from Denzel Washington and, especially, Viola Davis.

But one original movie in theaters right now, not adapted from a book or play, is a surprising tribute to the importance of the written word. I’m talking about Jim Jarmusch’s new film Paterson, and I’m telling you: if you love books and poetry and writing, you have to see this movie as soon as possible.

Paterson’s premise sounds like the setup for a limerick: Adam Driver stars as Paterson, a bus driver in Paterson, New Jersey. The film follows a week in his life, and not a whole lot, really, happens. Paterson is a man who likes his rituals: he walks the dog to the bar every night, and he writes a few lines of poetry into his notebook in the morning, and he likes to sit in the same spot and watch the water go over Paterson Falls. He and his girlfriend Laura (Golshifteh Farahani) live a quiet life that is mostly content. They could use a little more money, sure, but who couldn’t?

Paterson is a film of echoes. Certain themes repeat themselves over and over: fire, twins, rain. Paterson admires the poetry of William Carlos Williams, the city of Paterson’s most famous literary resident, and Williams’ work reverberates through the film as well. (Williams wrote an epic poem about the city also titled Paterson.) These little instances accrue into a fuller portrait, a pointillist masterpiece.

Paterson doesn’t write his poetry for the sake of immortality. He writes poetry because it’s how he processes the world. Driver reads the lines over and over in a halting voice as Paterson writes in his notebook and the handwritten words appear on screen. We see him sitting in his small office, lined with books by Williams and David Foster Wallace and Frank O’Hara, as he struggles to get the words just so. He seems to meet poets around every street corner: everyone is recording the universe in careful handwriting on lined paper in secret notebooks.

Paterson made me happier than any movie I’ve seen in recent memory. It’s a movie about art for the sake of art, a movie about writing and reading for no reason but for the pleasure of writing and reading. Paterson’s life inspires his art, which in turn inspires his life. There’s probably no big break around the corner for him. He’s probably not going to get a big thick hardcover anthology of his work. But he does it anyway, because he has to, and because it makes him better.

Trust me: you don’t want to half-watch Paterson on your couch while idly flicking through your phone. This is a movie to watch in the theater. Afterward, take public transit home. Bring a book of poetry to read on the bus or the train. Eavesdrop on some conversations. There’s art everywhere — you just have to be ready to receive it."
paterson  jimjarmusch  fil  towatch  poetry  everyday  notebooks  attention  mundane  paulconstant  2017  williamcarloswilliams  understanding  thinking  whywewrite  happiness  howwewrite  writing  words  notetaking  observation  listening  art  life  living  reading  artleisure  leisurearts 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Toryansé and the storytelling advantages of short games - Kill Screen
"Nick Preston decided to call his upcoming series of short adventure games Toryansé after the Japanese folk song of the same name. The song is traditionally sung as part of a children’s game—Warabe uta, which is very similar to the English nursery rhyme game Oranges and Lemons—but has surprisingly dark lyrics thought to relate to a period of high infant mortality in Japan’s history. But it wasn’t only the song’s background that appealed to Preston, it was also the fact that it’s often played at Japanese traffic lights to indicate when it’s safe for pedestrians to cross.

“I loved the idea of layers of story being embedded in a part of everyday life, you could use a crossing every day and not realize,” Preston told me. This idea is what will unite each of his short games; threading a path between the mysterious and the mundane. The first one, due in early 2017, is called Reel and follows an elderly woman who runs a computer repair business in a small shopping arcade. The story starts when she receives a misaddressed package and sets off to find its intended recipient. In her exploration, the woman discovers the previous life of the building that she was unaware of, despite having worked there for years.

The stories that Preston intends to release after Reel will we built of the same material. “The core idea for each story is to show a character stepping outside of their normal, everyday routine and briefly experiencing something that makes them reassess, in some small way, the environment or people around them, then returning to normality feeling a little bit better,” Preston said."

[via: https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/815010536777719808 ]

[more Nick Preston:
https://twitter.com/holyfingers
http://www.toryanse.co.uk/
http://www.holyfingers.co.uk/main/
http://artoftoryanse.tumblr.com/ ]
games  gaming  via:tealtan  videogames  everyday  mystery  mundane  toryansé  nickpreston  japan  storytelling  shortgames  shortness  atemporality  history  memory  place 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Wall Street’s Insatiable Lust: Data, Data, Data
By BRADLEY HOPE
Updated Sept. 12, 2016

One of his best strategies is to attend the most seemingly mundane gatherings, such as the Association for Healthcare Resource & Materials Management conference in San Diego last year, and the National Industrial Transportation League event in New Orleans.

“I walk the floor, try to talk to companies and get a sense within an industry of who collects data that could provide a unique insight into that industry,” he said.....Data hunters scour the business world for companies that have data useful for predicting the stock prices of other companies. For instance, a company that processes transactions at stores could have market-moving information on how certain products or brands are selling or a company that provides software to hospitals could give insights into how specific medical devices are being used......A host of startups also are trying to make it easier for funds without high-powered data-science staffers to get the same insights. One, called Quandl Inc., based in Toronto, offers a platform that includes traditional market data alongside several “alternative” data....
alternative_data  conferences  data  data_hunting  hedge_funds  insights  investors  exhaust_data  market_moving  medical_devices  mundane  private_equity  Quandl  quants  sentiment_analysis  unconventional  unglamorous  Wall_Street 
september 2016 by jerryking
Black Liquorice - Prongsyouignoramus (ItUnscrewsTheOtherWay) - Harry Potter - J. K. Rowling [Archive of Our Own]
Being separated from Severus on the first day of Secondary school is not ideal, but Lily manages. Its surprisingly easy to make friends with the other students of 7Gryff, although she's not sure about that runty kid called Potter.
fic  HarryPotter  LilyEvans  prongsyouignoramus  mundane  highschool  au 
may 2016 by adanska
7 powerful photographs of terminally ill patients living out their final wishes
Turns out that life's simplest pleasures just might be the most meaningful. via Upworthy
Maybe  the  things  we  remember  at  end  aren't  time  went  skydiving  or  hiked  across  Europe.  When  our  is  up  what  we'll  most  more  mundane    tacky  wallpaper  i 
may 2016 by beckymcmichael
Out of West - rageprufrock - Stargate Atlantis [Archive of Our Own]
In 1991, Desert Storm began, Pete Rose got banned from the Baseball Hall of Fame, the Soviet Union collapsed, and Rodney McKay was framed for academic fraud.
fic  StarGate  SGA  McKay  Sheppard/McKay  rageprufrock  mundane  au 
april 2016 by adanska
the reason for stars -- scenes from middle of fuckall, michigan
“Fuck,” Han said with feeling, resisting the urge to actually wail on the engine block. For one, it was still hot as hell and he didn’t feel like dealing with third degree burns in the middle of nowhere, and for another, it wouldn’t solve the problem. “Fuck, fuck fuck shit and—”

“That’s not gonna help.”
fic  StarWars  TFA  HanSolo  Rey  notbecauseofvictories  mundane  au 
march 2016 by adanska
CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts
"February 23 – April 9, 2016

Wang Bing: Three Portraits

Opening reception: February 23, 6:30-8:30 pm.

Details are what make humans human. The slight intonation that gives emphasis to one word over another. The tightened jaw that accompanies impatience. The compliment disguised as a question. The hand gestures. The hesitations.

Film has the time to see the details. A film can linger, wait, and be patient. Wang Bing's films are about the details, how they accumulate, and how they come to determine entire lives and tell the story of entire cultures and entire ideologies.

Most are documentary films, but their lack of linear narrative and their extreme duration bring them closer to being history paintings. Unlike many history painters, however, he is not interested in spectacular events but prefers the minor and the mundane—the details—because he knows that the minutiae of daily routines can be the building blocks of life itself. (AH)"

[See also: http://www.wattis.org/MEDIA/00777.pdf ]
wangbing  film  srg  2016  wattis  art  humans  documentary  narrative  details  time  patience  slow  everyday  mundane  tosee 
february 2016 by robertogreco

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