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Science of science
Barabasi et al data on the scale of scientific collaborations. They are getting much, much larger.
breakthrough  slowdown  paradox  science 
8 days ago by michael.bhaskar
Age dynamics in scientific creativity
Benjamin F. Jones and Bruce A. Weinberg show that scientists and science are getting older. The average age of a Nobel laurate when they make their winning breakthrough as risen - now late 40s, used to be mid to late 30s.
breakthrough  paradox  slowdown  science 
8 days ago by michael.bhaskar
The Burden of Knowledge and the Death of the Renaissance Man: Is Innovation Getting Harder?
The key paper from Benjamin F. Jones on how more and more knowledge accrues costs in innovation.
breakthrough  slowdown  innovation  paradox  complexity 
8 days ago by michael.bhaskar
Wired interview with Geoff Hinton -how journals slow academia
GH: One big challenge the community faces is that if you want to get a paper published in machine learning now it's got to have a table in it, with all these different data sets across the top, and all these different methods along the side, and your method has to look like the best one. If it doesn’t look like that, it’s hard to get published. I don't think that's encouraging people to think about radically new ideas.

Now if you send in a paper that has a radically new idea, there's no chance in hell it will get accepted, because it's going to get some junior reviewer who doesn't understand it. Or it’s going to get a senior reviewer who's trying to review too many papers and doesn't understand it first time round and assumes it must be nonsense. Anything that makes the brain hurt is not going to get accepted. And I think that's really bad.

What we should be going for, particularly in the basic science conferences, is radically new ideas. Because we know a radically new idea in the long run is going to be much more influential than a tiny improvement. That's I think the main downside of the fact that we've got this inversion now, where you've got a few senior guys and a gazillion young guys.
breakthrough  paradox  research  science 
21 days ago by michael.bhaskar
Globe editorial: Why the Meng case feels like a replay of 2001 - The Globe and Mail
On Sept. 10, 2001, if you’d asked a random collection of international policy experts to name the biggest challenge to the global order, most of them would have given a one-word answer: China.....And then 9/11 happened. Nearly two decades later, it’s as if the world has awakened from that detour to find itself at its original destination, and much sooner than expected.

A China once rising has now risen – by some measures, it’s already the world’s largest economy......It’s why the arrest this month of Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, and China’s response, feel like a kind of replay of the Hainan incident – but under very different circumstances. Compared with 2001, today’s China is far more powerful. It is also more than ever at the centre of the global economic and political system. Yet, it doesn’t always follow the rules and norms of that system. And that has created a paradox – the paradox expected by pre-9/11 analysts. China is part of the system. It is also an antagonist.

Though it’s put itself and its products at the centre of the international economy, China also operates with one foot outside of the international order. For example, it’s part of the WTO and its free-trade rules, from which it benefits. But it takes advantage of the rules more than it follows them.

It’s part of a global co-operative of organizations such as Interpol....but earlier this year, the man it placed at the head of the organization was effectively disappeared by his own government.....It’s also a government that responded to the arrest of Ms. Meng by kidnapping two Canadians on invented charges...The case is a reminder of the two big China challenges that Ottawa, and its allies, must grapple with.

The fact that China is part of the international economy and the largely open movement of goods and people is a good thing.....However, China has abused the invitation to join the international trading system. The Trump administration is right that China is an unfair trader. The trade relationship has to be realigned. The goal should not be to shut China out. It must be to ensure that China is made fully part of the system and is bound by rules imposed by the rest of the developed world, which together is much wealthier and more powerful than China.
China  China_rising  Canada  editorials  foreign_policy  international_system  multipolarity  paradox  piracy  rogue_actors  Canada-China_relations  WTO  Huawei  U.S.-China_relations  Meng_Wanzhou  reprisals 
4 weeks ago by jerryking
Berkson's paradox - Wikipedia
For example, if the risk factor is diabetes and the disease is cholecystitis, a hospital patient without diabetes is more likely to have cholecystitis than a member of the general population, since the patient must have had some non-diabetes (possibly cholecystitis-causing) reason to enter the hospital in the first place. That result will be obtained regardless of whether there is any association between diabetes and cholecystitis in the general population.

An example presented by Jordan Ellenb...
statistics  math  mathematics  paradox  probability 
5 weeks ago by hellsten

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