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The Gospel According to Mark Fisher
There is a society beyond individuals — and, as a corollary point, the setbacks and catastrophes sustained by individuals usually have collective political and economic causes. They therefore must have collective political and economic solutions. The utility of individualizing problems, as neoliberalism does, is to prevent us from identifying and pursuing those solutions — chiefly because the solutions will inevitably involve undermining the profits and redistributing the wealth of the capitalist elites who run society and want to keep it that way.

Fisher loathed the circular firing squad, made infinitely bigger but no less circular by social media. He called instead for renewed solidarity on the Left — a not-uncritical but ultimately charitable attitude, a rejection of “bourgeois modes of subjectivity” that urge cutthroat competition and personal brand-building, a routinely reaffirmed sense of shared purpose and an orientation toward a common enemy on the outside, that enemy being the capitalist class that laughs all the way to the bank while we tear each other to pieces. (He was, inevitably, excoriated by other leftists in the wake of this essay’s publication.)
mark_fisher  Philosophy  Theory  writing 
1 hour ago by jstenner
The Gospel According to Mark Fisher
There is a society beyond individuals — and, as a corollary point, the setbacks and catastrophes sustained by individuals usually have collective political and economic causes. They therefore must have collective political and economic solutions. The utility of individualizing problems, as neoliberalism does, is to prevent us from identifying and pursuing those solutions — chiefly because the solutions will inevitably involve undermining the profits and redistributing the wealth of the capitalist elites who run society and want to keep it that way.

Fisher loathed the circular firing squad, made infinitely bigger but no less circular by social media. He called instead for renewed solidarity on the Left — a not-uncritical but ultimately charitable attitude, a rejection of “bourgeois modes of subjectivity” that urge cutthroat competition and personal brand-building, a routinely reaffirmed sense of shared purpose and an orientation toward a common enemy on the outside, that enemy being the capitalist class that laughs all the way to the bank while we tear each other to pieces. (He was, inevitably, excoriated by other leftists in the wake of this essay’s publication.)
mark_fisher  Philosophy  Theory  writing 
1 hour ago by jstenner
Acting Liturgically - Nicholas Wolterstorff - Oxford University Press
Introduction
PART ONE: LITURGY, ENACTMENTS, AND SCRIPTS
1: What is Liturgy?
2: On Following a Liturgical Script
3: With One Accord: The Communal Dimension of Liturgical Enactments
4: On Bended Knee: the Bodily Dimension of Liturgical Enactments
5: What Are Those without Faith Doing in Liturgical Enactments?
PART TWO: LITURGY AND SCRIPTURE
6: On the Liturgical Reading and Singing of Scripture
7: Liturgical Repetition and Reenactment
8: Liturgical Commemoration
9: The Liturgical Present Tense
PART THREE: GOD IN THE LITURGY
10: God's Liturgical Activity
11: Does God Know What We Say to God?
PART FOUR: LITURGY, LOVE, AND JUSTICE
12: Liturgical Love
13: Justice and Injustice in Christian Liturgies
christianity  theology  liturgy  calvinism  philosophy  books 
23 hours ago by benjekman
Power, Pleasure, and Profit — David Wootton | Harvard University Press
We pursue power, pleasure, and profit. We want as much as we can get, and we deploy instrumental reasoning—cost-benefit analysis—to get it. We judge ourselves and others by how well we succeed. It is a way of life and thought that seems natural, inevitable, and inescapable. As David Wootton shows, it is anything but. In Power, Pleasure, and Profit, he traces an intellectual and cultural revolution that replaced the older systems of Aristotelian ethics and Christian morality with the iron cage of instrumental reasoning that now gives shape and purpose to our lives.

Wootton guides us through four centuries of Western thought—from Machiavelli to Madison—to show how new ideas about politics, ethics, and economics stepped into a gap opened up by religious conflict and the Scientific Revolution. As ideas about godliness and Aristotelian virtue faded, theories about the rational pursuit of power, pleasure, and profit moved to the fore in the work of writers both obscure and as famous as Hobbes, Locke, and Adam Smith. The new instrumental reasoning cut through old codes of status and rank, enabling the emergence of movements for liberty and equality. But it also helped to create a world in which virtue, honor, shame, and guilt count for almost nothing, and what matters is success.
books  history  capitalism  europe  ethics  philosophy  argument 
yesterday by kmt
Ethics Defined: Self Serving Bias - YouTube
The Self-Serving Bias is the tendency people have to process information in ways that advance their own self-interest or support their pre-existing views. This video is part of Ethics Defined, an animated library of more than 50 ethics terms and concepts from Ethics Unwrapped
video  philosophy  ethics  thinking  empathy  error 
yesterday by basemaly

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