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Population and migration - Office for National Statistics
Size, age, sex and geographic distribution of the UK population, and changes in the UK population and the factors driving these changes. These statistics have a wide range of uses. Central government, local government and the health sector use them for planning, resource allocation and managing the economy. They are also used by people such as market researchers and academics.
government  politics  demographic  statistics  migration  social  policy  poverty  health  research  analysis 
yesterday by asaltydog
Social Metrics Commission – An independent Commission formed to develop a new approach to poverty measurement in the UK
The Social Metrics Commission is an independent Commission formed to develop a new approach to poverty measurement that both better reflects the nature and…
charity  government  politics  demographic  statistics  metrology  finance  social  policy  poverty  health  research  analysis 
yesterday by asaltydog
The Social Metrics Commission - WPI Economics
The Social Metrics Commission The Social Metrics Commission is an independent charity dedicated to contributing to policy development and action to reduce…
economics  review  charity  government  politics  demographic  statistics  metrology  finance  social  policy  poverty  health  research  analysis 
yesterday by asaltydog
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. - The New York Times
Instead of offering a counternarrative to America’s moral trope of deservedness, liberals have generally submitted to it, perhaps even embraced it, figuring that the public will not support aid that doesn’t demand that the poor subject themselves to the low-paying jobs now available to them. Even stalwarts of the progressive movement seem to reserve economic prosperity for the full-time worker.
poverty  economy  america  homelessness  fusechange 
2 days ago by corrales
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. - The New York Times
The belief in work as the way out of poverty depends on the possibility of securing a job that pays enough; increasingly, such jobs do not exist, particularly for people with little education.
work  labor  poverty  inequality  social_justice  PSC_235 
2 days ago by johnmfrench
What I learned growing up in rural America
Interesting autobiographical piece from a woman whose experiences growing up poor+country largely mirror mine. Thoughts on why the rural poor are conservative, etc.
politics  class  economics  poverty 
3 days ago by jdroth
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not.
"U.S. unemployment is down and jobs are going unfilled. But for people without much education, the real question is: Do those jobs pay enough to live on?"
poverty  economy  politics 
4 days ago by jimmykduong
Americans Want to Believe Jobs Are the Solution to Poverty. They’re Not. - The New York Times
But rather than hold itself accountable, America reverses roles by blaming the poor for their own miseries.

Here is the blueprint. First, valorize work as the ticket out of poverty, and debase caregiving as not work. Look at a single mother without a formal job, and say she is not working; spot one working part time and demand she work more. Transform love into laziness. Next, force the poor to log more hours in a labor market that treats them as expendables. Rest assured that you can pay them little and deny them sick time and health insurance because the American taxpayer will step in, subsidizing programs like the earned-income tax credit and food stamps on which your work force will rely. Watch welfare spending increase while the poverty rate stagnates because, well, you are hoarding profits. When that happens, skirt responsibility by blaming the safety net itself. From there, politicians will invent new ways of denying families relief, like slapping unrealistic work requirements on aid for the poor.

As I watched this young man identify with Smith’s character, it dawned on me that what his parents, preachers, teachers, coaches and guidance counselors had told him for motivation — “Study hard, stick to it, dream big and you will be successful” — had been internalized as a theory of life.

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We need a new language for talking about poverty. “Nobody who works should be poor,” we say. That’s not good enough. Nobody in America should be poor, period. No single mother struggling to raise children on her own; no formerly incarcerated man who has served his time; no young heroin user struggling with addiction and pain; no retired bus driver whose pension was squandered; nobody. And if we respect hard work, then we should reward it, instead of deploying this value to shame the poor and justify our unconscionable and growing inequality. “I’ve worked hard to get where I am,” you might say. Well, sure. But Vanessa has worked hard to get where she is, too.
USA  economy  poverty  jobs  pay  wages  employment  outsourcing  zeroHours  insecurity  precarity  socialMobility  workEthic  welfare  workfare  TrumpDonald  blame 
5 days ago by petej

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