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CSS Feature Toggles - Chrome Extension
"This extension allows developers to disable support of modern CSS features from devtools. Disabling features such as flexbox, grid or blend-modes allows developers to see how their pages/apps will render in browsers that don't support them."
CSS  progressiveEnhancement  test  extension  clevermarks 
4 weeks ago by nhoizey
Reader Mode: The Button to Beat | CSS-Tricks
The browser Reader Mode is a fantastic example of how your site will never appear exactly as you want it to appear. The browser is a hostile environment to code and design. Your site has gotta be flexible!
web  inclusivedesign  readermode  progressiveenhancement  publishtoweb 
5 weeks ago by sonniesedge
Ethical Web Development
A set of principles for more ethical, user-centered development
accessibility  progressiveenhancement  webdev  ethics  design 
7 weeks ago by ste
Thinking differently about progressive enhancement - Adam Silver
> If a browser doesn’t support any of the APIs, the user always sees the content. It works, but it’s just not enhanced using progressive disclosure. Importantly, we’ve made sure the experience isn’t broken for anyone. That’s inclusion.

💯

I'm not sure how we've got to the point where we're okay with not supporting people on older devices.

"They can always upgrade, Charlie". No they can't. YOU can upgrade your laptop. Someone who is poorer may not be able to. And when they can't upgrade the device they're stuck with an under powered CPU that may not render the latest fanciness. And they often can't upgrade to the latest versions of browsers.

But please, carry on building essential services that can't be used by some people.
web  progressiveenhancement  inclusivedesign  publishtoweb 
8 weeks ago by sonniesedge
cferdinandi/bouncer: A lightweight form validation script that augments native HTML5 form validation elements and attributes.
This script for progressively enhanced HTML5 forms to something _even better_ is absolutely fantastic. I absolutely love things of this kind that take the core fundamentals of the web and enhance them even further.
web  progressiveenhancement  js  javascript  forms  publishtoweb 
9 weeks ago by sonniesedge
An Extensive Guide To Progressive Web Applications
In this article, we’ll look at the pain points of users who are browsing old non-PWA websites and the promise of PWAs to make the web great. You’ll learn most of the important technologies that make for cool PWAs, like service workers, web push notifications and IndexedDB.
javascript  webdevelopment  progressiveenhancement  pwa  serviceworker 
11 weeks ago by garrettc
The “Developer Experience” Bait-and-Switch
"TL;DR: we cannot continue to use as much JavaScript as is now “normal” and expect the web to flourish. At the same time, most developers experience no constraint on their use of JS…until it’s too late. “JS neutral” and “TTI negative” tools are here, but we’re stuck in a rhetorical rut. We need to reset our conversation about “developer experience” to factor in the asymmetric cost of JS."
javascript  performance  progressiveenhancement  worldwideweb  rant 
october 2018 by garrettc
The "Developer Experience" Bait-and-Switch | Infrequently Noted
JavaScript is the web’s CO2. We need some of it, but too much puts the entire ecosystem at risk. Those who emit the most are furthest from suffering the consequences — until the ecosystem collapses. The web will not succeed in the markets and form-factors where computing is headed unless we get JS emissions under control.
javascript  performance  progressiveenhancement  browsers 
october 2018 by beep
The web is actually really slow | Go Make Things
> a majority of the web’s growth is coming from developing areas, where mobile connections are the primary way to access the web and service is spotty or unreliable.

This perfectly sums up the state of the web for me.

> Think about how maddening trying to load some of your favorite websites is on 3g, or even LTE.
> Now imagine visiting them on 2g. That’s the web for a billion or so people.
> Slow. Buggy. Unreliable. Barely usable. Not usable.

Most frontend developers will never ever use their sites in the way that actual users do. We need to do better as a profession, because right now we are _rubbish_ at our jobs.
web  performance  progressiveenhancement 
october 2018 by sonniesedge
Software disenchantment @ tonsky.me
> As a general trend, we’re not getting faster software with more features. We’re getting faster hardware that runs slower software with the same features. Everything works way below the possible speed.

I empathise a lot with this post. Every time I upgrade my laptop, it gets slower. Each new app seems to aim to do more, while somehow doing less.

This trend is especially apparent in frontend web design. We're doing _pretty much the same as 10 years ago_ but with pages that are 100 times larger, and interfaces that are horrifically slow on anything but the latest iPhone and Mac.

We've sacrificed elegance, sleekness, and robustness for the ability to "pivot" and boot up sites and apps quickly in order to appease angel investors.

With this article, and many others,I hope we're seeing the start of a swing back to slowness and simplicity.
web  slowdown  progressiveenhancement 
september 2018 by sonniesedge
Trashy.css - The throwaway CSS library with no class
> This is just a silly idea, a CSS "library" that styles tags directly — as opposed to using class names as style hooks — to help people become more familiar with how to use semantic HTML.

This is definitely not a silly idea. Styling base components first and then overriding with classed components is a very useful technique. It's especially useful when combined with [graded browser support](https://github.com/springernature/frontend-playbook/blob/master/practices/graded-browser-support.md).
web  progressiveenhancement  css 
september 2018 by sonniesedge
Salty JavaScript analogy - HankChizlJaw
> JavaScript is like salt. If you add just enough salt to a dish, it’ll help make the flavour awesome. Add too much though, and you’ll completely ruin it.

> Similarly, if you add just enough JavaScript to your website, it’ll help make it awesome. Add too much though, and you’ll completely ruin it.

Salty, and true!
web  progressiveenhancement  js 
september 2018 by sonniesedge
The "Developer Experience" Bait-and-Switch | Infrequently Noted
"We need to confront the 'developer experience' bait-and-switch. Tools that cost the poorest users to pay wealthy developers are bunk".

Everything that @slightlylate says here is 🔥. You NEED to read it.
web  performance  progressiveenhancement  publishtobuffer 
september 2018 by sonniesedge
The "Developer Experience" Bait-and-Switch | Infrequently Noted
JavaScript is the web’s CO2. We need some of it, but too much puts the entire ecosystem at risk. Those who emit the most are furthest from suffering the consequences — until the ecosystem collapses. The web will not succeed in the markets and form-factors where computing is headed unless we get JS emissions under control.
javascript  webperf  performance  by:alexrussell  frontend  progressiveenhancement 
september 2018 by dirtystylus

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