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Tom Scocca: Ta-Nehisi Coates Has No Easy Answers (Hmm Daily)
Most political commentary depends on pretending that distance, between what the writer thinks should happen and the public thinks should happen, can be closed by one good argument.
race  politics 
3 hours ago by matthewmcvickar
The Illogic of Slavery Reparations at This Late Date - WSJ
Ms. Harris wants to hold slavery responsible for black America’s contemporary problems. But that requires ignoring the progress made by blacks—both in absolute terms and relative to whites—who lived much closer to the era of slavery. For example, the soaring violent-crime rates that produce so much “trauma” in poor black communities today did not exist in those communities in the first 100 years after emancipation, even though poverty rates at the time were much higher and racism was still legal and widespread.

Barry Latzer, a criminologist at John Jay College, reports that black male homicides fell by nearly 18% in the 1940s and by another 21% in the 1950s, while rates remained relatively flat among their white counterparts over the same period. Similarly, Harvard sociologist William Julius Wilson has written that “in ghetto neighborhoods throughout the first half of the twentieth century, rates of inner-city joblessness, teenage pregnancy, out-of-wedlock births, female-headed families, welfare dependency and serious crime were significantly lower than in later years and did not reach catastrophic proportions until the mid-1970s.”
race  slavery 
5 hours ago by dwalbert
College scam ‘mastermind’ faked ethnicity of students: docs
He wouldn’t just fake your kids’ water polo skills and pump up their SAT scores — college admissions scammer William “Rick” Singer could also fake your kid’s race.
As part of his larger scheme to get low-performing rich kids into top colleges, Singer would sometimes falsify students’ ethnicities to give them an affirmative action advantage, according to a little-reported detail from his guilty plea before a federal judge in Boston.
education  race 
11 hours ago by jimmykduong
Here's What's Become Of A Historic All-Black Town (Mound Bayou) In The Mississippi Delta : NPR
Teddy Roosevelt proclaimed it "The Jewel of the Delta."

Booker T. Washington praised it as a model of "thrift and self-government."

Mound Bayou, in the Mississippi Delta: a town founded in 1887 by former slaves, with a vision that was revolutionary for its time.

From the start, it was designed to be a self-reliant, autonomous, all-black community.

For decades, Mound Bayou thrived and prospered, becoming famous for empowering its black citizens. The town also became known as a haven from the virulent racism of the Jim Crow South.

"It's almost like it was an inverted or alternate universe, where being black was a positive thing," says Rolando Herts, director of the Delta Center for Culture and Learning at Delta State University.
history  race  inequalities 
22 hours ago by oripsolob
Segregation in the Armed Forces During World War II and the Double V Campaign || The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross
Two months to the day after Pearl Harbor (Feb. 7, 1942), the most widely read black newspaper in America, the Pittsburgh Courier, found a way to split the difference — actually, the newspaper cleverly intertwined them into a symbol and a national campaign that urged black people to give their all for the war effort, while at the same time calling on the government to do all it could to make the rhetoric of the Declaration of Independence and the equal rights amendments to the Constitution real for every citizen, regardless of race. And in honor of the battle against enemies from without and within, they called it “the Double V Campaign.”
War  race  history  inequalities 
23 hours ago by oripsolob
The Second Middle Passage || The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross
That second forced migration was known as the domestic, or internal, slave trade: “In the seven decades between the ratification of the Constitution [in 1787] and the Civil War [1861],” the historian Walter Johnson tells us in his book Soul by Soul: Life Inside the Antebellum Slave Market, “approximately one million enslaved people were relocated from the upper South to the lower South … two thirds of these through … the domestic slave trade.” In other words, two and a half times more African Americans were directly affected by the second Middle Passage than the first one.
race  history  Economics  inequalities 
23 hours ago by oripsolob
The Truth Behind '40 Acres and a Mule' || The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross
It is difficult to stress adequately how revolutionary this idea was: As the historian Eric Foner puts it in his book, Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877, “Here in coastal South Carolina and Georgia, the prospect beckoned of a transformation of Southern society more radical even than the end of slavery.”
War  race  history  inequalities 
23 hours ago by oripsolob

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