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Feature: A truly graphic adventure: the 25-year rise and fall of a beloved genre
Space Quest. Day of the Tentacle. Gabriel Knight. Monkey Island. To gamers of a certain age, the mere names evoke an entire world of gaming, now largely lost.

Graphic adventure games struggle to find success in today's market, but once upon a time they topped sales charts year after year. The genre shot to the top of computer gaming in the latter half of the 1980s, then suffered an equally precipitous fall a decade later. It shaped the fate of the largest companies in the gaming industry even as the games' crude color graphics served as the background for millions of childhood memories. It gave us Roger Wilco, Sam & Max, and the world of Myst. But few gamers today know the complete history of the genre, or how the classic Sierra and LucasArts titles of the late 1980s and early 1990s largely disappeared beneath the assault of first-person shooters.

Here's how we got from King's Quest to The Longest Journey and why it matters—and getting to the end of this particular story won't require the use of a text parser, demand that you combine two inscrutable inventory objects to solve a demented puzzle, or send you pixel-hunting across the screen.






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Features  Reviews  Reviews  Gaming  graphicadventuregames  sierraonline  from google
january 2011 by sbmandal
Feature: A truly graphic adventure: the 25-year rise and fall of a beloved genre
Space Quest. Day of the Tentacle. Gabriel Knight. Monkey Island. To gamers of a certain age, the mere names evoke an entire world of gaming, now largely lost.

Graphic adventure games struggle to find success in today's market, but once upon a time they topped sales charts year after year. The genre shot to the top of computer gaming in the latter half of the 1980s, then suffered an equally precipitous fall a decade later. It shaped the fate of the largest companies in the gaming industry even as the games' crude color graphics served as the background for millions of childhood memories. It gave us Roger Wilco, Sam & Max, and the world of Myst. But few gamers today know the complete history of the genre, or how the classic Sierra and LucasArts titles of the late 1980s and early 1990s largely disappeared beneath the assault of first-person shooters.

Here's how we got from King's Quest to The Longest Journey and why it matters—and getting to the end of this particular story won't require the use of a text parser, demand that you combine two inscrutable inventory objects to solve a demented puzzle, or send you pixel-hunting across the screen.






Read the comments on this post
Features  Reviews  Reviews  Gaming  graphicadventuregames  sierraonline  from google
january 2011 by ByronFortescue
Feature: A truly graphic adventure: the 25-year rise and fall of a beloved genre
Space Quest. Day of the Tentacle. Gabriel Knight. Monkey Island. To gamers of a certain age, the mere names evoke an entire world of gaming, now largely lost.

Graphic adventure games struggle to find success in today's market, but once upon a time they topped sales charts year after year. The genre shot to the top of computer gaming in the latter half of the 1980s, then suffered an equally precipitous fall a decade later. It shaped the fate of the largest companies in the gaming industry even as the games' crude color graphics served as the background for millions of childhood memories. It gave us Roger Wilco, Sam & Max, and the world of Myst. But few gamers today know the complete history of the genre, or how the classic Sierra and LucasArts titles of the late 1980s and early 1990s largely disappeared beneath the assault of first-person shooters.

Here's how we got from King's Quest to The Longest Journey and why it matters—and getting to the end of this particular story won't require the use of a text parser, demand that you combine two inscrutable inventory objects to solve a demented puzzle, or send you pixel-hunting across the screen.






Read the comments on this post
Features  Reviews  Reviews  Gaming  graphicadventuregames  sierraonline  from google
january 2011 by jonraphaelson
Feature: A truly graphic adventure: the 25-year rise and fall of a beloved genre
Space Quest. Day of the Tentacle. Gabriel Knight. Monkey Island. To gamers of a certain age, the mere names evoke an entire world of gaming, now largely lost.

Graphic adventure games struggle to find success in today's market, but once upon a time they topped sales charts year after year. The genre shot to the top of computer gaming in the latter half of the 1980s, then suffered an equally precipitous fall a decade later. It shaped the fate of the largest companies in the gaming industry even as the games' crude color graphics served as the background for millions of childhood memories. It gave us Roger Wilco, Sam & Max, and the world of Myst. But few gamers today know the complete history of the genre, or how the classic Sierra and LucasArts titles of the late 1980s and early 1990s largely disappeared beneath the assault of first-person shooters.

Here's how we got from King's Quest to The Longest Journey and why it matters—and getting to the end of this particular story won't require the use of a text parser, demand that you combine two inscrutable inventory objects to solve a demented puzzle, or send you pixel-hunting across the screen.






Read the comments on this post
Features  Reviews  Reviews  Gaming  graphicadventuregames  sierraonline  from google
january 2011 by stateless
Sierra On-Line games hit iPad via web app, those old enough to remember them rejoice
You may or may not be old enough to remember Sierra On-Line, makers of such fine games as Leisure Suit Larry, the King's Quest, and Police Quest, but none of that matters anymore. Thanks to the folks over at Sarien, you now have access to these glorious titles via your iPad's web browser. The entire catalog has been ported over, and the games which were previously available via the web only are now there on your Apple tablet! The whole shebang is now hosted on Amazon's content distribution network, and the games have been extensively tweaked for that multitouch interface. Sarien hasn't apparently been issued a cease and desist from Activision -- owners of the catalog -- yet, so get these free gems of yesteryear while you can.Sierra On-Line games hit iPad via web app, those old enough to remember them rejoice originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 14 Jan 2011 21:40:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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activision  gaming  kings_quest  KingsQuest  leisure_suit_larry  LeisureSuitLarry  police_quest  PoliceQuest  sarien  sierra_online  SierraOnline  web_app  web_apps  WebApp  WebApps  from google
january 2011 by teymur
Old Sierra On-Line games now available on iPad via the Web
Get ready to lose your weekend. As we reported it would a while back, Sarien.net is now offering up a whole slew of old Sierra On-Line games, playable through your iPad's web browser for free. The first three King's Quest games, the first two Police Quest games, and even a Leisure Suit Larry title are all online and available. Sarien.net even allows for multiplayer within these old games, so you might see some other players in there while you're wandering around trying to solve puzzles. For those of us who grew up or cut our gaming teeth on these Sierra titles, this is kind of a goldmine.

Sarien, a.k.a. Martin Kool, hasn't received a cease-and-desist from Activision yet, but he has received some kudos from some of the original games' creators. Hopefully that will be enough to keep Activision's legal team at bay, at least until they get these games on the iPad officially.

Don't let that stop you from enjoying these games while they're up and available to play -- I just gave King's Quest another shot, and it's weird to go back and play a game where actual death is around every corner.

[via TouchArcade]
Old Sierra On-Line games now available on iPad via the Web originally appeared on TUAW on Fri, 14 Jan 2011 17:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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january 2011 by willhindson
Old Sierra games coming to iPad as unofficial web apps
Sierra's old-school adventure games of the '80s bring back many memories of days where finding cheats and walk-throughs were hard to come by, and a binder of scribbled clues sat by my tiny monitor. Many of those same games have been ported to the web, and we're likely to see them made especially for the iPad soon.

Martin Kool of sarien.net has made a hobby of porting many of Sierra's older adventure games to the web, and now he wants to make those same games work especially well on the iPad. Kool plans to make each title on its own landing page, where visitors can create web app icons on their iOS devices to each page, essentially giving them access to a full-blown, free Sierra game.

Another cool aspect to these ported games is that Kool has added a multiplayer aspect to them. You could be walking around the Kingdom of Daventry and see another player completing the quests along with you!

So far Sierra's parent company, Activision, has not submitted a cease and desist letter, but he won't fight them if it comes to that. Kool does not plan to make any money off his ports, and they will remain ad-free.

[via Touch Arcade]
Old Sierra games coming to iPad as unofficial web apps originally appeared on TUAW on Tue, 19 Oct 2010 20:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.
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Activision  iOS  iPad  ipad_games  IpadGames  sarien.net  sierra_games  sierra_online  SierraGames  SierraOnline  space_quest_1Sierra  SpaceQuest1sierra  web_apps  web_games  WebApps  WebGames  from google
october 2010 by teymur

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