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The FuzzyLog: A Partially Ordered Shared Log
The FuzzyLog is a partially ordered shared log abstraction. Distributed applications can concurrently append to the partial order and play it back. FuzzyLog applications obtain the benefits of an underlying shared log – extracting strong consistency, durability, and failure atomicity in simple ways – without suffering from its drawbacks. By exposing a partial order, the FuzzyLog enables three key capabilities for applications: linear scaling for throughput and capacity (without sacrificing atomicity), weaker consistency guarantees, and tolerance to network partitions. We present Dapple, a distributed implementation of the FuzzyLog abstraction that stores the partial order compactly and supports efficient appends / playback via a new ordering protocol. We implement several data structures and applications over the FuzzyLog, including several map variants as well as a ZooKeeper implementation. Our evaluation shows that these applications are compact, fast, and flexible: they retain the simplicity (100s of lines of code) and strong semantics (durability and failure atomicity) of a shared log design while exploiting the partial order of the Fuzzy-Log for linear scalability, flexible consistency guarantees (e.g., causal+ consistency), and network partition tolerance. On a 6-node Dapple deployment, our FuzzyLog- based ZooKeeper supports 3M/sec single-key writes, and 150K/sec atomic cross-shard renames.
database  consistency  storage 
8 hours ago by mpm
Our lock-and-leave culture: the rise of self-storage and clinging to stuff we hardly use | Society | The Guardian
Caroline Baum

Mon 17 Dec 2018 01.47 GMT Last modified on Mon 17 Dec 2018 03.22 GMT
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Second_Closet  self-storage  storage 
16 hours ago by jerryking
GitHub - theproductiveprogrammer/kore: The Simplest Distributed Log Database
The Simplest Distributed Log Database. Contribute to theproductiveprogrammer/kore development by creating an account on GitHub.
log  storage  database  opensource  floss 
22 hours ago by gilberto5757
Mountain Duck
mounts remote cloud services as drive. can install many times on different machines as long as you are the only user.
ftp  mac  app  storage  mount  drive  finder  paid  purchase  license  explorer  windows  apple  microsoft  program  application  software  computing  cloud 
yesterday by therobyouknow
The U.S. Government Once Nuked a Bunch of File Cabinets - Atlas Obscura
In 1955, the Department of Defense began Operation Teapot, one of dozens of nuclear experiments that have been performed at the Nevada Test Site since the late 1940s. Operation Teapot consisted of 14 separate explosions, each of which provided the DoD with the opportunity to assess various outcomes of interest.

A test called “Wasp,” for example, was meant to show what would happen if a nuclear device detonated at low altitude. For another, called “ESS,” an 8000-pound bomb was exploded underground, to see how large of a crater it would make. (Many of the tests had quotidian names, like “Bee” and “Zucchini,” which are illustrated on an incongruously playful diploma given to participants.)...

While they were at it, they figured, they might as well nuke some file cabinets, too. For Project 35.5, “Effects of a Nuclear Explosion on Records and Records Storage Equipment,” the FCDA teamed up with the National Records Management Council, several companies that made safes, and a superintendent from Western Union. They filled various storage vessels with various types of media, scattered them at various distances from Apple-2’s Ground Zero, and waited to see what would happen when the bomb dropped.

The project’s official report—which was first released in June of 1958, and was uploaded by nuclear historian Alex Wellerstein on his blog, Restricted Data, in 2011—explains the rationale. “Business records are the memory of an organization,” it reads. “Preservation of important business records in a disaster can help ensure survival of managerial direction and continuity of enterprise."...

The report also lays out the process, which was quite thorough. The guinea pigs included “a complete variety of records storage equipment,” such as file cabinets, steel shelving, corrugated cardboard boxes, and different classes of safe. Inside were materials ranging from photographic film to paper letters to telegraph tape. These were then put in assigned locations, some inside or next to structures, and some completely exposed. For one subtest, the group put samples of four different types of paper—“new rag, old rag, soda sulfite, and purified sulfite”—in various Survival Town basements and garages....

Money chests fared far better. One, originally placed just a fifth of a mile from Ground Zero, was found about 350 feet from its original location, burned and with a broken lock. It had done its job, the report says: “The contents, which were in excellent condition, included a gold watch case, paper, United States postage stamps, loose microfilm, and microfilm in a sealed can.”
archives  storage  intellectual_furnishings  nuclear  destruction 
yesterday by shannon_mattern

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