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FEW-View™ - FEWSION
Map-based simulation of supply chains in the US
FEW-View  supply_chain 
24 days ago by tomjlowe
The Software That Shapes Workers’ Lives | The New Yorker
Could S.C.M. software include a “workers’-rights” component—a counterpart to PP/DS, incorporating data on working conditions? Technically, it’s possible. SAP could begin asking for input about worker welfare. But a component like that would be at cross-purposes with almost every other function of the system. On some level, it might even undermine the purpose of having a system in the first place. Supply chains create efficiency in part through the distribution of responsibility. If a supervisor at a toy factory objects to the production plan she’s received, her boss can wield, in his defense, a PP/DS plan sent to him by someone else, who worked with data produced by yet another person. It will turn out that no one in particular is responsible for the pressures placed on the factory. They flow from the system—a system designed to be flexible in some ways and rigid in others.
logistics  supply_chain  software 
10 weeks ago by shannon_mattern
What’s Really Disrupting Business? It’s Not Technology - HBS Working Knowledge - Harvard Business School
Author "majority of customers in those markets had changing needs and wants, and their behavior was changing"

Interview also touches on: decoupling [of value prop] & value chain implications; 90-97% of consumer spending is concentrated in 7 categories

https://hbs.me/2NKsGeY

"I realized that 90 to 97 percent of consumer spending is concentrated in seven categories. I call them the categories that better consumers, from their point of view: where they live, what they eat, what they wear, how they move, how they heal themselves, how they educate themselves, and how they entertain themselves.

When consumers change their behavior, the first signs can be seen in one of these seven industries, and it quickly multiplies.
disruption  supply_chain  value_proposition  market_economics 
11 weeks ago by tom.reeder
flowmap.blue - Flow map visualization tool
This app can render a geographic flow map visualization from a spreadsheet published on Google Sheets.

It can be used to visualize numbers of movements of people or goods between pairs of geographic locations (Origin-Destination data).
supply_chain  mapping  teaching_technology 
12 weeks ago by shannon_mattern
The Internet, Divided Between the U.S. and China, Has Become a Battleground - WSJ
One side, championed in China, is a digital landscape where mobile payments have replaced cash. Smartphones are the devices that matter, and users can shop, chat, bank and surf the web with one app. The downsides: The government reigns absolute, and it is watching—you may have to communicate with friends in code. And don’t expect to access Google or Facebook.

On the other side, in much of the world, the internet is open to all. Users can say what they want, mostly, and web developers can roll out pretty much anything. People accustomed to China’s version complain this other internet can seem clunky. You must toggle among apps to chat, shop, bank and surf the web. Some websites still don’t seem to be designed with smartphones in mind.

The two zones are beginning to clash with the advent of the superfast new generation of mobile technology called 5G. China aims to be the biggest provider of gear underlying the networks, and along with that it is pushing client countries to adopt its approach to the web—essentially urging some to use versions of the “Great Firewall” that Beijing uses to control its internet and contain the West’s influence....

The collision of these universes as 5G arrives is exacerbating conflict between the U.S. and China and could broaden the rift and drive more of the world into China’s cyberspace model.

Networks using 5G technology are expected to download movies on phones in seconds, help enable self-driving cars, and connect components ranging from pacemakers to factory machines to the internet. Military futurists say 5G may alter battlefields, connecting tanks and drones with artificial intelligence.

China is aiming to expand its zone with 5G. It is aggressively promoting 5G networks, establishing a body in 2013 composed of regulators, companies and scientists to design and control every aspect of the process. It built a state facility where anyone selling 5G equipment in China must test it....

China’s 5G goal is to “win primacy,” said China’s leading proponent of the effort, Wu Hequan of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, last month, according to a transcript conference organizers posted. The government’s information office and the Cyberspace Administration, an internet regulator, didn’t respond to requests for comment.

That Chinese challenge has suddenly come to the fore because one giant has leapt the divide between the parallel universes. Huawei Technologies Co. is now the world’s biggest supplier of the equipment that goes into mobile-computing networks.

The 5G equipment itself won’t tilt the playing field—the gear is the plumbing of the internet, based on global standards that are agnostic as to what web developers and users run on it.

But many in Washington, from Congress to members of the national-security and intelligence communities, warn that Huawei’s Chinese ownership means Beijing could use the gear to spy on the world and more broadly be a camel’s nose under the tent to expand its influence...

The U.S. has also accused Huawei of stealing trade secrets and violating sanctions, raising the possibility the Trump administration could cut its access to critical U.S.-made components. Huawei denies wrongdoing.

If that happens, said Paul Triolo, a former federal government analyst who heads up global technology research at risk consulting firm Eurasia Group, China could build a version of 5G that isn’t compatible with the U.S. network. “If the global supply chain for 5G really falls apart,” he said, “we would be in totally new territory.”

Huawei Deputy Chairman Ken Hu said it has amassed 13,000 suppliers and that: “If any link in this global industry chain is obstructed in an unusual way, that would have major impact on the development of the industry chain and even the economic development of countries involved.” Huawei declined to comment further for this article.
5G  telecommunications  infrastructure  china  supply_chain 
february 2019 by shannon_mattern
More on the Supermicro Spying Story - Schneier on Security
I've blogged twice about the Bloomberg story that China bugged Supermicro networking equipment destined to the US. We still don't know if the story is true, although I am increasingly skeptical because of the lack of corroborating evidence to emerge.
We don't know anything more, but this is the most comprehensive rebuttal of the story I have read.
amazon  apple  china  chip  hack  privacy  security  server  supply_chain 
january 2019 by rgl7194
Independent review finds no spy chips in Super Micro servers - Six Colors
Reuters reports on the latest findings—or lack thereof—in the Bloomberg spy chip story from October:
Computer hardware maker Super Micro Computer Inc told customers on Tuesday that an outside investigations firm had found no evidence of any malicious hardware in its current or older-model motherboards.
It seems pretty clear by now that Bloomberg—either knowingly or unknowingly—published a story that was demonstrably false. There has been no corroborating evidence from any other source or publication, and Apple, Amazon, and officials from both the U.S. and UK governments have all said there is nothing to back up the allegations.
This is extremely damaging for Bloomberg’s credibility, especially as the publication has made no move to retract the article, offer a correction, or indeed say anything publicly about the story. I certainly wouldn’t put any stock in anything that it reports in the information security realm—and perhaps not in technology in general—until it explains exactly how this story got published.
amazon  apple  china  chip  hack  privacy  security  server  supply_chain 
december 2018 by rgl7194
Audit: No Chinese surveillance implants in Supermicro boards found | Ars Technica
In letter to customers, company declares no evidence supporting Bloomberg report.
In a letter to customers issued December 11, Supermicro President and CEO Charles Liang and other top executives announced that an audit conducted by an outside investigating team had found no evidence of any malicious hardware incorporated into motherboards currently or previously manufactured by the company. The letter is the latest rebuttal to Bloomberg reports in October that claimed tiny chips that provided a backdoor for China's intelligence agencies had been integrated into boards provided to major Internet and cloud providers—a report also refuted by the companies the report claimed were targeted.
"After a thorough examination and a range of functional tests, the investigative firm found absolutely no evidence of malicious hardware on our motherboards," the letter signed by Liang, Supermicro Senior Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer David Weigland, and Senior VP and Chief Product Officer Raju Penumatcha stated. "These findings were no surprise to us... We appreciate the industry support regarding this matter from many of our customers, like Apple and AWS. We are also grateful for numerous senior government officials, including representatives of the Department of Homeland Security, the director of National Intelligence, and the director of the FBI, who early on appropriately questioned the truth of the media reports."
amazon  apple  china  chip  hack  privacy  security  server  supply_chain 
december 2018 by rgl7194

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