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A Letter to Jamie Dimon – Chain
I wrote a letter to Jamie Dimon (and anyone else still struggling to understand cryptocurrencies)
bitcoin  freedom  cryptoCurrency  censorship  govtSupression  surveillance 
3 days ago by Jswindle
Leaky-by-design location services show outsourced security won't ever work • The Register
It gets worse. As reported in El Reg, little bit of code published to Github a fortnight ago showed how any app granted access to the photos on your smartphone (hint: that’s quite a few of them) can simply walk through your database of images and generate an accurate map of your movements. In many cases this record of movements can go back years.

Every geek I’ve told about this had the same reaction: a facepalm. Of course our photos keep a record of our movements. Of course any app that has access to our photos can produce a map of our movements. Two unrelated features collide, generating a kind of retrospective self-surveillance of which the NSA would be proud.
2017-10  data  security  surveillance  tech 
3 days ago by Weaverbird
This Is What A 21st-Century Police State Really Looks Like #China
"China, which has already deployed the world’s most sophisticated internet censorship system, is building a surveillance state in Xinjiang, a four-hour flight from Beijing, that uses both the newest technology and human policing to keep tabs on every aspect of citizens’ daily lives. The region is home to a Muslim ethnic minority called the Uighurs, who China has blamed for forming separatist groups and fueling terrorism. Since this spring, thousands of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities have disappeared into so-called political education centers, apparently for offenses from using Western social media apps to studying abroad in Muslim countries, according to relatives of those detained." - Megha Rajagopalan, BuzzFeed News
otf  china  surveillance  privacy  asia  gfw  uyghur 
3 days ago by dmcdev
Apple Watch hits cellular snag in China • WSJ
Yang Jie and Yoko Kubota:
<p>For the first time, the Apple Watch can have an independent cellular connection, allowing people to use it to make voice calls, send and receive text and data even if the watch isn’t wirelessly connected to an iPhone.

But in China, the feature was abruptly cut off for new subscribers, without explanation, after a brief availability with one telecom company.

Industry analysts say the suspension likely stemmed from Chinese government security concerns to do with tracking users of the device, which uses different technology than standard mobile phones.

China strictly regulates mobile phones and all three major telecom service providers are state-owned companies. To get a SIM—subscriber identity module—card to operate the phone, users must register under their real names with a network carrier.

The latest Apple Watch poses a challenge to the existing user identification system, industry analysts said. The watch contains a new and tiny version of the SIM card, called embedded SIM, or eSIM. The eSIM is embedded in the watch by Apple, not by carriers.

The benefit of a device carrying an eSIM is that, with software, users can choose a telecom operator and a communications plan. But in China, that new system raises the question of how carriers and regulators can track the device user’s identity.

“The eSIM (system) isn’t mature enough yet in China,” one analyst said. “The government still needs to figure out how they can control the eSIM.”</p>


Just in case anyone needed a riposte to some of the articles that have been running suggesting China is a wonderful place to be.
china  applewatch  surveillance 
4 days ago by charlesarthur
UW ADINT: Advertising as Surveillance
Targeted advertising is at the heart of the largest technology companies today, and is becoming increasingly precise. Simultaneously, users generate more and more personal data that is shared with advertisers as more and more of daily life becomes intertwined with networked technology. There are many studies about how users are tracked and what kinds of data are gathered. The sheer scale and precision of individual data that is collected can be concerning. However, in the broader public debate about these practices this concern is often tempered by the understanding that all this potentially sensitive data is only accessed by large corporations; these corporations are profit-motivated and could be held to account for misusing the personal data they have collected. In this work we examine the capability of a different actor -- an individual with a modest budget -- to access the data collected by the advertising ecosystem. Specifically, we find that an individual can use the targeted advertising system to conduct physical and digital surveillance on targets that use smartphone apps with ads

--over dramatized version here
https://www.wired.com/story/track-location-with-mobile-ads-1000-dollars-study
computaional_advertising  surveillance  data  privacy  technology  GAFA 
4 days ago by rvenkat

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