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The QUICening
"The first is UDP to replace TCP. UDP is widely used for fire-and-forget protocols where packets are sent but their arrival or ordering is not guaranteed (TCP provides the opposite: it guarantees arrival order and delivery but at a cost). Because UDP doesn’t have TCP’s guarantees it allows developers to innovate new protocols that do guarantee delivery and ordering (on top of UDP) that can incorporate features that TCP lacks.

One such feature is end-to-end encryption. All QUIC connections are fully encrypted. Another proposed feature is forward-error correction or FEC. When NASA’s Deep Space Network talks to the Voyager 2 spacecraft (which recently left our solar system) it transmits messages that become garbled crossing 17.6 billion km of space (that’s about 11 billion miles). Voyager 2 can’t send back the equivalent of “Say again?” when it receives a garbled message so the messages sent to Voyager 2 contain error-correcting codes that allow it to reconstruct the message from the mess.

Similarly, QUIC plans to incorporate error-correcting codes that allow missing data to be reconstructed. Although an app or server can send the “Say again?” message, it’s faster if an error-correcting code stops that being needed. The result is snappy apps and websites even in difficult Internet conditions.

QUIC also solves the HTTP/2 HoL problem. HoL is head of line blocking: because HTTP/2 sits on top of TCP and TCP guarantees delivery order if a packet gets lost the entire TCP connection has to wait while the missing packet is retransmitted. That’s OK if only one stream of data is passing over the TCP connection, but for efficiency it’s better to have multiple streams per connection. Sadly that means all streams wait when a packet gets lost. QUIC solves that because it doesn’t rely on TCP for delivery and ordering and can make an intelligent decision about which streams need to wait and which can continue when a packet goes astray.

Finally, one of the slower parts of a standard HTTP/2 over TCP connection is the very beginning. When the app or browser makes a connection there’s an initial handshake at the TCP level followed by a handshake to establish encryption. Over a high latency connection (say on a mobile phone on 3G) that creates a noticeable delay. Since QUIC controls all aspects of the connect it merges together connection and encryption into a single handshake."
networks  tcp  udp  quic  http  networking  protocols 
17 days ago by earth2marsh
OverTheWireOrg/docker-tcp-switchboard: Launch a fresh docker container per SSH connection
Launch a fresh docker container per SSH connection - OverTheWireOrg/docker-tcp-switchboard
Could be useful in CTFs
docker  spawner  ssh  tcp  infrastructure  sysadmin 
19 days ago by plaxx
The Illustrated TLS 1.3 Connection: Every Byte Explained
Detailed look at how a TLS connection is brought up and exchanges data.
networking  tcp  http  ssl  security  guide  encryption 
21 days ago by amcewen
HTTP/3 Replaces TCP with UDP to Boost Network Speed, Reliability - The New Stack
Getting the performance and security benefits of HTTP/2 for sites and services meant making architectural changes because it upended principles like sharding that had been used to improve web site performance; that may be why only around 35 percent of websites currently use HTTP/2.
http  tcp  udp  network 
28 days ago by laiuydfoiu1
HTTP/3 Replaces TCP with UDP to Boost Network Speed, Reliability - The New Stack
Getting the performance and security benefits of HTTP/2 for sites and services meant making architectural changes because it upended principles like sharding that had been used to improve web site performance; that may be why only around 35 percent of websites currently use HTTP/2.
http  tcp  udp  network 
28 days ago by myersg86

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