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WWhy you need to normalize Unicode strings | With Blue Ink
Never heard of Unicode normalization? You’re not alone. But it will save you a lot of trouble.
javascript  unicode 
yesterday by branneman
When "Zoë" !== "Zoë". Or why you need to normalize Unicode strings | With Blue Ink

TL;DR
In short, if you’re building a web application and you’re accepting input from users, you should always normalize it to a canonical form in Unicode.

With JavaScript, you can use the String.prototype.normalize() method, which is built-in since ES2015.
unicode  development  webdev  article 
2 days ago by davidgasperoni
When "Zoë" !== "Zoë". Or why you need to normalize Unicode strings | With Blue Ink
Never heard of Unicode normalization? You’re not alone. But it will save you a lot of trouble.
unicode  encoding 
2 days ago by lorenzck
GitHub - begriffs/utofu: Unicode Trust on First Use (TOFU)
"The concept is similar to how you trust SSH key fingerprints the first time they are used. If the fingerprint ever changes, SSH fails. With utofu you trust strings and save them in a single-file database. Attempting to save a new string which is confusable with one already in the database causes an error"
security  unicode  c  repo:github  reference  pmz  piperesearch 
3 days ago by mechazoidal
begriffs/utofu: Unicode Trust on First Use (TOFU)
Unicode Trust on First Use (TOFU). Contribute to begriffs/utofu development by creating an account on GitHub.
unicode  security 
4 days ago by e2b
When "Zoë" !== "Zoë". Or why you need to normalize Unicode strings | With Blue Ink
In fact, while the two strings above look identical on screen, the way they’re represented on disk, the bytes saved in the file, are different. In the first “Zoë”, the ë character (e with umlaut) was represented a single Unicode code point, while in the second case it was in the decomposed form. If you’re dealing with Unicode strings in your application, you need to take into account that characters could be represented in multiple ways.
unicode  normalize  javascript 
5 days ago by jaumeb
When "Zoë" !== "Zoë". Or why you need to normalize Unicode strings | With Blue Ink
It first hit me many years ago, when I was building an app (in Objective-C) that imported a list of people from an user’s address book and social media graph, and filtered out duplicates. In certain situations, I would see the same person added twice because the names wouldn’t compare as equal strings. In fact, while the two strings above look identical on screen, the way they’re represented on disk, the bytes saved in the file, are different. In the first “Zoë”, the ë character (e with umlaut) was represented a single Unicode code point, while in the second case it was in the decomposed form. If you’re dealing with Unicode strings in your application, you need to take into account that characters could be represented in multiple ways.
unicode  normalization  text 
5 days ago by dlkinney
Google's Three Gender Emoji Future
Coming to Android this year: a third gender option for emojis such as Police Officer, Zombie, Person Facepalming, Construction Worker and People With Bunny Ears.
Revealed by Google in a submission to the Unicode Consortium last week, these changes signal a new direction from Google which has in recent years played ball with other vendors in overlooking Unicode guidelines, in favor of cross platform compatibility.
In giving public notice via Unicode, Google hopes that other vendors will join them in this effort to standardize many of the emoji which don't specify a gender.
This builds on an initial few gender inclusive revisions made by Google in 2018.
google  emoji  gender  unicode 
5 days ago by rgl7194
Apple's Emoji Evolution 1997—2018
Since updating the Emojipedia archives with the SoftBank emoji set from 1997, it's a good time to now show how this original set of 90 emojis released over two decades ago has a direct lineage to the emoji set used on iOS today.
The fact that Apple's emoji designs were created to be largely compatible with SoftBank in Japan is not new - and the evolution of Apple emoji is an area we've covered many times before.
What is new is the restoration of the original emojis from 1997, and the ability to place these in the wider context of the Apple Color Emoji font of today.
Shown below are a series of tables highlighting three key years:
1997: The first emoji set from SoftBank (née J-Phone)
2008: The year Apple created its own emoji set for iPhone in Japan
2018: The most recent version of Apple's emoji set
apple  emoji  history  90s  2000s  2010s  unicode 
5 days ago by rgl7194

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