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urban_intensification

Keeping the Mink Mile hot in a cooling retail era - The Globe and Mail
WALLACE IMMEN
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 19, 2019

* HIGH-END RETAIL EXPERIENCE IS PUSHING ITS BOUNDARIES
The affluence of this retail location influences nearby streets, spilling north to the area’s namesake Yorkville Avenue.
Turns out this northern stretch of Yorkville Avenue between the Hazelton Hotel at 118 Yorkville Ave. and Bellair Street has seen rents nearly double over the course of three years, currently averaging between $250 and $275 a square foot, JLL found. By comparison, leases on Toronto’s Queen Street West average $100 a square foot, Robson Street in Vancouver $225 and Saint-Catherine Street in Montreal $210, JLL reports. Of course, those numbers pale in comparison to New York’s upper Fifth Avenue, where rents can reach US$2,720, the Beverly Hills triangle in Los Angeles that can command US$1,100 and Oxford Street in London where prime rents are the equivalent of US$775.

* GROWTH IN UPSCALE SHOPPING AREA ISN’T AN ACCIDENT
Yorkville’s launch into the upper echelons didn’t happen by accident, though. Even a few years ago, there was speculation that with shifts in retailing toward more online shopping and a retrenchment of brands that the zone north of the Mink Mile would fall into decline.

Yorkville was getting decidedly shop worn by 2011, when First Capital Properties, a subsidiary of First Capital Realty Inc., acquired Hazelton Lanes, a 1970s shopping mall at the corner of Avenue Road and Yorkville Avenue.

To pump life into the area, First Capital developed a long-term vision for Yorkville that started with a total renovation of the old mall – to give it more street presence. The redevelopment also allowed for a rebranding and the mall became known as Yorkville Village.....There are about 11,000 condominium units in the immediate area and that’s destined to double in the next two years based on what is planned for the area and what is currently under construction.

Add to this the tourism and the business community along Bloor Street and the University of Toronto, and the area is rich in potential customers,

* TREND IN HIGH-END RETAILING REQUIRES ONGOING COMMUNITY SUPPORT
In the past, many brands shifted their flagship stores into enclosed malls, but there’s now a shift back to brands – particularly the higher-end and exclusive name brands – having their main flagship stores at street level in Yorkville.......While the trend in high-end retailing is as much a developer’s vision as it is a retailer’s desire, a lot of the growth in this luxury retail space can be attributed to continual community-building efforts.

“We work in collaboration with other landlords and retailers and galleries in the area to create a sense of neighbourhood,” says Melissa Campisi, First Capital’s director of strategic partnerships and event management.....Events and attractions throughout the year are key to building a retail experience.... In a space that was formerly an Anthoropolgie store, First Capital arranged fashion talks and charity events........

* THE FUTURE OF THE HIGH-END RETAIL EXPERIENCE AT YORKVILLE
The Yorkville area is destined to become even more of a world-class retail destination as the area transforms with an unprecedented amount of construction and new leasing activity......The trends are in favour of growth for luxury retail, concludes the 2019 Canadian Luxury Apparel Market report by retail marketing research firm Trendex North America...... the Canadian luxury apparel market will increase by 5.8 per cent in 2019 and by 18 per cent from 2019 to 2023, to reach $3.2-billion in sales within the next five years.....More importantly,...the luxury sector growth rate will be nearly twice that of the overall clothing retail sector.
affluence  brands  densification  high-end  luxury  Mink_Mile  neighbourhoods  property_development  real_estate  rebranding  retailers  Toronto  upscale  urban_intensification  uToronto  Wallace_Immen  Yorkville 
november 2019 by jerryking
Toronto announces plans for new downtown park above active railway - The Globe and Mail
MAHNOOR YAWAR
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Aug. 03, 2016

Toronto plans to build a large-scale downtown park above the railway corridor between Bathurst Street and the Rogers Centre. The Rail Deck Park, spanning 21 acres (8.5 hectares), would harness the open space above the active railway in a bid to connect downtown with the waterfront and counter high-rise development in the densely populated area. ...The proposed park will be modelled after the likes of Chicago’s Millennium Park or the under-construction Hudson Yards in Manhattan, both of which “decked” over active rail corridors.
Toronto  parks  CN  waterfronts  intensification  Rail_Deck_Park  South_Core  railways  urban_intensification  urban_planning 
august 2016 by jerryking
Toronto has finally found the confidence to act like a big city - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 18 2015

Toronto has finally found the confidence to act like a big city.

Back in the 1970s, Toronto was so fearful about density and development that city hall slapped a temporary 45-foot (13.7-metre) height restriction on new construction in the downtown core. Over time, planners have come to understand that if the region is going to absorb hundreds of thousands of newcomers without succumbing to endless urban sprawl, it will have to grow up rather than out. Now the boom in condo construction and the vogue for downtown living has made it possible to build a denser, livelier urban core. If central Toronto is starting to feel even a bit like Manhattan, it can only be a good thing.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  densification  downtown_core  urban  urbanization  urban_intensification  urban_planning  skyscrapers  building_codes 
march 2015 by jerryking
Expert advice on building the city of the 21st century - The Globe and Mail
ALEX BOZIKOVIC
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 13 2015

Anthony Townsend, researcher at NYU’s Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management; author of Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for A New Utopia...density bonusing works==> When more density is proposed by developers, if it is considered reasonable, cities then negotiate additional public benefits as well. In value capture, if a city invests in something like public transit, it can apply a charge on development around that transit, reflecting how public investment has increased nearby land value....Jan Gehl, founding Partner of Gehl Architects; former professor at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts; author, most recently, of How to Study Public Life
cities  Toronto  mayoral  urban  21st._century  smart_cities  public_transit  inner_suburbs  books  densification  urban_intensification  Michael_Thompson 
february 2015 by jerryking
Why competent city government matters - The Globe and Mail
JEFFREY SIMPSON
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 29 2014

Everywhere, “densification” of downtowns is the order of the day, which makes eminent sense, provided the increasing density is done properly from planning, lifestyle, transportation, and carbon emissions reductions perspectives (which hasn’t been the case in central Toronto’s condo-land, as one example).

Cities are on the front line of many issues that transcend their boundaries, climate change being one. Municipal governments have a host of powers – garbage, building codes, development, transit – that directly affect carbon emissions. What they do, or don’t, is consequential for the country’s overall record.

Similarly, how cities integrate newcomers to Canada affects the entire country’s civic life and economic prospects. Thus far, the melding of so many immigrants into the Canadian mainstream has been one of the country’s most significant accomplishments. It happens, overwhelmingly, in neighbourhoods, schools and other urban public places.
cities  mayoral  densification  Toronto  government  Jeffrey_Simpson  urban  urban_intensification  arrival_cities  neighbourhoods  competence  Michael_Thompson  social_integration 
october 2014 by jerryking
Livable, booming core stirs envy, but raises infrastructure worries - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 14 2014

Young people are flocking to inhabit the lively, walkable neighbourhoods springing up downtown. In some, such as King-Spadina and Waterfront West, seven out of 10 residents are ‘echo boomers,’ 20 to 39 years old.

The number of people working downtown has been soaring, too. Downtown gained more than 43,000 office jobs in the five years to 2011. A host of big companies, from Google to Telus to Coca-Cola, have moved into new downtown offices. Although downtown contains just 3 per cent of the city’s land area, it accounts for half of its GDP, a third of its jobs and a quarter of its tax base. More than a quarter of a million people commute into downtown each morning by public transit.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  urban  urbanization  urban_intensification  urban_planning  downtown_core  Big_Tech  millennials  neighbourhoods  King-Spadina  Port_Lands  livability  walkability 
june 2014 by jerryking
Why we’re better off living in hyperdense cities built around mass transit
Oct. 11 2013 | G&M | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

Vishaan Chakrabarti is getting into a cab. This is a bit surprising because the architect and academic is a constant transit rider, like most of his neighbours in Manhattan.

“I’m a guy who’s usually in the subway, unless I have a few calls to make,” he admits good-naturedly as a fire truck screams past him. He thinks we should ride the subway, too – his new book, A Country of Cities, argues that “hyperdense” cities built around mass transit, make us more prosperous and happier, too.
cities  design  densification  transit  books  urban_intensification  urban_planning 
october 2013 by jerryking
TTC to probe conversion of two GO train tracks - The Globe and Mail
KALEIGH ROGERS

The Globe and Mail

Published
Wednesday, Jul. 24 2013

The feasibility study will look at the impacts of including more vehicles on the busy lines, but TTC CEO Andy Byford said its worth considering as the corridors are not at capacity yet.

“It does seem to me there is some spare capacity. At the end of the day, we should be looking to sweat the assets and maximize use of all rail corridors in this city,” Mr. Byford said, adding a more substantial relief line to the east end would still be needed.

“That takes time to construct, and it’s $8-billion that we don’t currently have. Certainly as a stop gap, I think we should be talking to GO to say, ‘Is there anything that we can do in a much shorter time frame?’”
transit  TTC  DRL  Toronto  urban_intensification  urban_planning  sweating_the_assets 
august 2013 by jerryking

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