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Center for the Future of Museums: Painting in Blue
Thursday, December 1, 2016
Painting in Blue

Often, I must repeat what I do for a living. You teach police about art? Not exactly. I teach them to improve their observation and communication skills by learning to analyze works of art. Paintings, sculptures, and photographs have proven to be transformative tools in professional training programs for authorities in law enforcement, intelligence, and counterterrorism. Agencies from around the country and around the world are turning to museum collections to bolster their efforts to combat crime, terrorism, and unrest in our increasingly threatened and complex world....The US spends about $15B each year to train doctors, and over $100B per year to train and maintain police forces. Shouldn’t museums, drawing a direct line from their resources to improved outcomes for these and other critical social needs, be included in that support? ..... In 2001, as Head of Education at The Frick Collection, I instituted a program for medical students, The Art of Perception. Based on a model program at the Yale Center for British Art, the course took medical students from the clinical setting into an art museum to teach them to analyze works of art—big picture and small details—and articulate their observations. When they returned to the hospital, they would, we reasoned, be better observers of their patients. (You can find an assessment of the program in Bardes, Gillers, and Herman, “Learning to Look: Developing Clinical Observational Skills in an Art Museum, Medical Education, vol 35,no.12, pp.1157-1161.) Humanities in medical training has a strong historical precedent and this program underscored the value of critical thinking and visual analysis in the disciplines of both medicine and art history.
art  art_galleries  Communicating_&_Connecting  creativity  critical_thinking  empathy  historical_precedents  inferences  law_enforcement  museums  noticing  observations  pay_attention  perception  policing  the_big_picture  training_programs  visual_analysis  visual_cues 
december 2016 by jerryking
Graphics - World - Infographic Elements - Visual Information | GraphicRiver
Unique and special visual information for info-graphic design. This infographic template file includes dozens of professional graphic elements, great for any design you need, such as presentations,...
visual_analysis 
july 2012 by JenX
Gephi, an open source graph visualization and manipulation software
Gephi is an open-source software for visualizing and analyzing large networks graphs. Gephi uses a 3D render engine to display graphs in real-time and speed up the exploration. Use Gephi to explore, analyse, spatialise, filter, cluterize, manipulate and export all types of graphs.
visual_analysis 
july 2012 by JenX
ChartsBin.com - Visualize your data
ChartsBin.com is a web-based data visualization tool that will allow everyone to quickly and easily create rich interactive visualizations with their own data.
visual_analysis 
july 2012 by JenX
40 Infographic Tools For Your Nonprofit - Use Them Today
We have compiled this list of 40 infographic tools. Online, Free or just awesome tools to get your nono-profit started telling your story.
visual_analysis 
july 2012 by JenX
Free Visualization Software | Free Analysis Software | Free Analytics
Visualize Free is a free visual analysis tool. No software to install. Upload a dataset and create a visualization on your data in minutes.
visual_analysis 
july 2012 by JenX
Edward Tufte
Edward Tufte home page for books, posters, sculpture, fine art and one-day course: Presenting Data and Information
visual_analysis 
may 2012 by JenX
PeteSearch: How to turn data into money
October 20, 2010 by Pete Warden. The most important unsolved
question for Big Data startups is how to make money. Here's a hierarchy
showing the stages from raw data to cold, hard cash:
(1) Data. You have a bunch of files containing info. you've gathered,
way too much for any human to ever read. You know there's a lot of
useful stuff in there though, but you can talk until you're blue in the
face & the people with the checkbooks will keep them closed. The
data itself, no matter how unique, is low value, since it will take
somebody else a lot of effort to turn it into something they can use to
make $. (2) Charts. Take that massive deluge of data and turn it into
some summary tables & simple graphs. You want to give an unbiased
overview of the info., so the tables & graphs are quite detailed.
This makes a bit more sense to the potential end-users, they can at
least understand what it is you have, and start to imagine ways they
could use it. (3) Reports; (4) Recommendations.
analysis  commercialization  data  data_driven  data_marketplaces  data_scientists  entrepreneurship  hierarchies  ideas  InfoChimps  massive_data_sets  monetization  value_creation  visual_analysis  visualization 
july 2011 by jerryking
National Visualization and Analytics Center (NVAC)
The U.S. Government faces a critical challenge in identifying and preventing attacks on U.S. soil. The National Visualization and Analytics Center (NVAC™) is a national and international resource providing strategic leadership and coordination for visua
visual_analysis  visualization 
march 2006 by charding

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