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Byron Allen Spares No One in Accusing Comcast of Racial Bias
Nov. 23, 2019 | The New York Times | By John Eligon.

The black entrepreneur has gone after civil rights groups and other black leaders to make his case. Some fear that protections dating to 1866 are in jeopardy.

Entrepreneur, Byron Allen, offers his life story as a model of African-American economic success.....Byron filed a $20 billion lawsuit against Comcast in 2015, contending that Comcast, after discussing a deal to carry six of his company’s channels, had turned it down in violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1866. The nation’s oldest federal civil rights law, it gives “all persons” the same right “enjoyed by white citizens” to “make and enforce contracts” and “to sue.”.......the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, in San Francisco, ruled last year that a lower district court had “improperly dismissed” it. Comcast appealed. The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear the case......At stake before the court in oral arguments on Nov. 13 was not the specifics of his dispute with Comcast, but the standard for proving racial discrimination. The justices seemed to focus on the narrow question of whether a plaintiff like Mr. Allen must make the case that racial discrimination was the main factor or just a contributing factor in the early stages of litigation.........Comcast has vigorously defended its record on diversity and refuted Mr. Allen’s claims of discrimination, arguing that the six networks he wants it to distribute are not interesting enough for its lineup or aren’t distinct from current offerings. His demand that Comcast carry all of them in high definition and the price he is asking are unreasonable, the company said.........A key element of Mr. Allen’s argument centers on an agreement Comcast struck with black leaders and organizations in 2010 in order to get clearance to purchase NBCUniversal. As part of the deal, the conglomerate agreed to add four new African-American owned networks over eight years. Two of those networks were owned by Sean Combs, the mogul better known as Diddy, and Magic Johnson, the former basketball star and entrepreneur.
Mr. Allen has argued that the organizations that helped broker the deal — the National Urban League, Mr. Sharpton’s National Action Network and the N.A.A.C.P. — were essentially bought off by Comcast, which has donated money to them. The agreement provided only token investment in black-owned networks, Mr. Allen said, and has been used to justify blocking black entrepreneurs from getting a seat at the table......putting black faces out there.....isn't the same things as true economic inclusion......Comcast said it spent $13.2 billion on programming last year, but a spokeswoman declined to say what share of that went to black-owned networks........Sean Combs, surprisingly, has publicly backed Mr. Allen’s point of view and leveled his own criticism against the company for not providing proper support for his television network, Revolt.
“Our relationship with Comcast is the illusion of economic inclusion,” Mr. Combs said.....many black leaders have avoided expressing a firm opinion on whether or not Byron Allen was discriminated against by Comcast........The 2010 agreement between Comcast and the civil rights groups failed to position the black-owned networks for success, said Paula Madison, the former chief diversity officer at NBCUniversal who helped broker the deal. An issue raised during negotiations, Ms. Madison said, was whether the company would guarantee the networks a certain number of subscribers. In the end, Comcast agreed to launch the channels, with no guarantee of how many subscribers they would reach......Ms. Madison said she felt that Comcast had a duty to try to help the new black-owned networks succeed, because they were integral to the company’s gaining federal approval to acquire NBCUniversal. But at a time when streaming becomes dominant and cable operators are looking to shed channels, Ms. Madison said she believed Comcast executives would not blink if the black-owned networks went away.
“It’s laissez-faire,” Ms. Madison said of Comcast’s treatment of the channels. “It’s, ‘They want channels, we’ll give them channels.’”
African-Americans  Byron_Allen  CATV  Comcast  economic_inclusion  entertainment_industry  entrepreneur  lawsuits  moguls  NAACP  racial_bias  racial_discrimination  U.S._Supreme_Court  Weather_Channel 
november 2019 by jerryking
Most Popular Weather Site: Weather Underground [Hive Five Followup]
Looking outside to get the forecast is great if you want to know current conditions in your neighborhood, but if you're planning a trip across town or across the country, or just want to know what the commute will be like on the way to or from the office, you need to check the weather. Last week, we asked you which sites you trusted for accurate, reliable weather forecasts, and then we took a look at the top five weather web sites. Now we're back to crown the champion, based on your votes. More »
Hive_Five_Followup  accuweather  Forecast  Hive_Five  Meteorology  national_weather_service  Noaa  NWS  Service  Weather  weather_channel  Weather_Underground  Weatherspark  web_services  Web_Sites  Webapps  Wunderground  from google
april 2012 by StephaneDenis
Five Best Weather Web Sites [Hive Five]
Whether you're planning to head out around town for an afternoon or you want to know what the weather is going to be like at your destination before you head to the airport, you probably have a weather site that you trust to deliver an accurate and useful forecast. There are plenty to choose from, but this week we're going to take a look at the top five, based on your nominations.

Earlier in the week we asked you which weather sites you trust to help you pack and prep for your trips to the office or across country. You responded with tons of great suggestions. Sadly, we only have room for the top five.

Weather.com/The Weather Channel
The venerable Weather Channel has a reputation with many of you for accuracy, simplicity, and ease of use. The site is straightforward, remembers your location, and offers an accurate hourly prediction for the day ahead, 48 hour forecast, and even 5-day and 10-day forecasts to help you plan for future events. Maps and radar are there if you need them, but the focus of the site is on current conditions, any severe weather alerts like storms, air quality alerts, pollen alerts, and other information you may want to know before you leave the office for lunch or head out in the morning before work. Simple and accurate.

Weatherspark
Weatherspark prides itself on its attractive graphs, maps, and charts, and they definitely deliver on that front. Type in your location and you'll be treated to a beautiful dashboard with a map of current temperatures around your area, along with an interactive, data-driven graph of temperatures in your area, organized by hour, along with a percentile range of accuracy, so you know exactly how likely it is to stray from the projected temperature, and what the statistical max and minimum temperatures will be. Hit forecasts to see a comprehensive daily or hourly forecast for the next few days. It's not the fastest way to get a forecast, but it's definitely one of the prettiest.

Accuweather
Accuweather garnered both love and hate from many of you, but enough nominations to make the top five. Many of you pointed to its mobile apps and widgets as being some of the most accessible for day-to-day use when you need to know how much to bundle up before you leave for work, or whether you should carry an umbrella when you go grocery shopping, but many of you criticized Accuweather for its forecast accuracy, especially for long-term projections. Even so, Accuweather offers a lot of international forecasts, which many of you liked.

Weather Underground
Accurate forecasts, detailed information, current conditions and forecasts at the top and incredibly detailed data further down the page, and accurate information in rural areas down to the specific weather station that's closes to your house were all reasons many of you prefer Weather Underground to any other site. The site design is a little busy, but the relevant information is at the top right where you can get to it. Plus, large interactive maps, terrain maps, storm tracks, regional, national, and international forecasts, and more make for an exceptional weather site. Don't forget to visit the discussions, where meteorologists discuss the day's forecasts, models, and how they arrived at their predictions.

Weather.gov/NOAA
The vast majority of weather sites get their weather data from stations operated by or at least sponsored by the National Weather Service, so why not get your weather information right from the source? Many of you said you do, and head straight to Weather.gov when you want to find out what the conditions are in your neck of the woods or across town. The interface isn't the best, and don't expect some of the bells and whistles from some of the other sites, but you will get accurate, up-to-date conditions, forecasts, satellite imagery, radar maps, and more, all in one place. In addition to current conditions, NOAA offers all sorts of information about ground conditions, from brush fires to wind advisories. The data is incredibly complete, and most importantly, most of the source information that other services use to build their own forecasts.

Now that you've seen the top five, it's time to vote for the all out winner.

What's The Best Weather Web Site?
Honorable mentions this week go out to Intellicast, which a number of you said may not be the best looking, but definitely worth a look if you want accurate regional, national, and travel-based weather reports. Also, we can't let this topic go without mentioning another runner-up, The F**king Weather, which is absolutely perfect if you don't need frills, maps, projections, doppler, or any of that crap, and you just want to know what it's like outside.

So what do you think of the contenders? Have something to say about one of the ones mentioned above, or want to make the case for your favorite that may have not made the list? Remember, the top five are based on your most popular nominations from the call for contenders thread from earlier in the week. Sound off in the comments below.

The Hive Five is based on reader nominations. As with most Hive Five posts, if your favorite was left out, it's not because we hate it—it's because it didn't get the nominations required in the call for contenders post to make the top five. We understand it's a bit of a popularity contest, but if you have a favorite, we want to hear about it. Have a suggestion for the Hive Five? Send us an email at tips+hivefive@lifehacker.com!
Hive_Five  accuweather  Feature  Forecast  Meteorology  national_weather_service  Noaa  NWS  Service  Top  Weather  weather_channel  Weather_Underground  Weatherspark  web_services  Web_Sites  Webapps  Wunderground  from google
april 2012 by DarkHalf
Five Best Weather Web Sites [Hive Five]
Whether you're planning to head out around town for an afternoon or you want to know what the weather is going to be like at your destination before you head to the airport, you probably have a weather site that you trust to deliver an accurate and useful forecast. There are plenty to choose from, but this week we're going to take a look at the top five, based on your nominations. More »
Hive_Five  accuweather  Feature  Forecast  Meteorology  national_weather_service  Noaa  NWS  Service  Top  Weather  weather_channel  Weather_Underground  Weatherspark  web_services  Web_Sites  Webapps  Wunderground  from google
april 2012 by amitry
Stats: Yahoo News, The Weather Channel tops in news traffic - Valleywag
Drudge has the latest Hitwise report [PDF] on news website traffic. Yahoo News tops the list with 7.75 percent market share, followed by Weather.com with 4.65 percent. Yahoo is the monster in the space: by combining Yahoo's news and weather sites, the com
news  Yahoo  Weather_Channel 
january 2008 by LouieHerr

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