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work-life-balance

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Ryan Seacrest's secrets to time management and his hectic schedule - Business Insider
Two-line emails, okay. Very, very short emails. A very efficient way to have phone calls. And, I don't, I don't really like down time, so if there’s time in a car, if there’s time on a walk, walking meetings. I mean, I will jam anything in at any point in time so that by 6:30 at night, most of what I'm going to cover for the day is done and I can actually enjoy the evening and have a bite to eat.
ryan-seacrest  work-habits  work-life-balance  productivity  work  routine 
4 weeks ago by lwhlihu
50 Reasons Why Everyone Should Want More Walkable Streets
Someone with a one-hour commute in a car needs to earn 40% more to be as happy as someone with a short walk to work. On the other hand, researchers found that if someone shifts from a long commute to a walk, their happiness increases as much as if they’d fallen in love.
work  work-life-balance  commuting  remote-work  health 
6 weeks ago by pjohnkeane
Why do we work so hard?
A thought-provoking dissection of why many knowledge workers work so hard. It’s not because we don’t enjoy it, but because we do. It’s less a job as it is an identity and a community that many don’t want to give up.
work-life-balance 
october 2017 by irace
The Research Is Clear: Long Hours Backfire for People and for Companies
While managers did penalize employees who were transparent about working less, Reid was not able to find any evidence that those employees actually accomplished less, or any sign that the overworking employees accomplished more.
work  work-life-balance  productivity  sarah-green-carmichael 
october 2017 by JorgeAranda
Wer weniger arbeitet, leistet mehr – TagesWoche
> Dabei gibt es auch aus wirtschaftlicher Sicht gute Gründe für kürzere Arbeitstage.
work-life-balance 
september 2017 by arnalyse
Watch out for this disturbing new trend in job interviews | Ladders
"It’s the hot new thing in job interviews: Testing whether candidates are willing to sacrifice everything — their home lives, their families, their health — for the good of their company.

"The Muse recently wrote that we should be aware of “work-life balance ‘tests'” during interviews, highlighting the chief executive of Barstool Sports, Erika Nardini, who reportedly texts job applicants interviewing with the company on weekends. Nardini said she does this 'just to see how fast you’ll respond,' in an interview with The New York Times. She expects to be contacted back 'within three hours,' she elaborated.
interviews  work-life-balance  jobsearch 
august 2017 by katherinestevens
The company isn’t a family – Signal v. Noise
Whenever executives talk about how their company is really like a big ol’ family, beware. They’re usually not referring to how the company is going to protect you no matter what or love you unconditionally. You know, like healthy families would. The motive is rather more likely to be a unidirectional form of sacrifice: Yours.

The best companies aren’t families. They’re supporters of families. Allies of families. There to provide healthy, fulfilling work environments so when workers shut their laptops at a reasonable hour, they’re the best husbands, wives, parents, siblings, and children they can be.
signal-vs-noise  david-heinemeier-hansson  work-life-balance  workplace-culture 
july 2017 by yolandaenoch

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