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Quercki : fruitvale   13

ST. FRANCES OF THE GRILL / No one ever went away hungry or mad at Ann's Cafe in Oakland - SFGate
ST. FRANCES OF THE GRILL / No one ever went away hungry or mad at Ann's Cafe in Oakland February 17, 2000
There is no one in Oakland with as many friends as Frances Bienati.

She's made them one at a time, just like the 100 pancakes, 15 dozen eggs and 50 to 60 pounds of potatoes she's grilled up at Ann's Cafe every day, five days a week for the last 42 years.

Every city has a place like this, a hole-in-the-wall breakfast spot that is heavy on atmosphere and legend, and the food is, well, it's filling.

The service and camaraderie are priceless. And that's what will be missed when Frances hangs up her spatula for the last time on Friday. She and her husband, Frank, are retiring and closing the doors to the Fruitvale Avenue cafe.

"It's just kinda down home, and everyone here is on a first-name basis," said Dave Arp, an Oakland police officer and an Ann's regular.

It's family all right, and Frances is everyone's adoring, and sometimes doting, Italian mother.

Three things are sure to happen anytime you pass through the door: You will be greeted and treated like a returning son or daughter. You'll be served so much food that you will not finish the meal, and if you're single, expect to be introduced or referred to someone Frances has chosen especially for you.
Ann  cafe  Fran  Fruitvale 
7 weeks ago by Quercki
How the Father of Oregon Agriculture Launched a Doomed Quaker Sex Cult | Portland Monthly
Within a few years, the orchard and its offspring had produced 20,000 boxes of fruit—one year’s yield was worth the equivalent of $11–17 million in today’s market. One horticulturalist later claimed Luelling’s fruit “brought more wealth to Oregon than all of the ships entering the Columbia River.” His nursery wasn’t just big business; it helped Portland climb out of San Francisco’s shadow as a major West Coast city—much of his fruit was shipped to SF during the gold rush—and cemented Oregon’s status as a fruit king of the West.


But Luelling wasn’t satisfied. In 1854, at age 45, he ditched Oregon for California, lured by its weather, wide-open space, and ostentatious fruit prices. He sold his Portland holdings to his brother and son-in-law, and left to start apricot and cherry orchards in his very own town of Fruitvale, outside Oakland. The settlement thrived, and his wealth grew.
Luelling  Fruitvale  cherries  sex  free  love 
march 2018 by Quercki
Official Blames Lead Levels In Oakland’s Fruitvale On Paint « CBS San Francisco
Larry Brooks with Alameda County’s lead prevention program said they should not.

“No. In Flint, the problem was the water system,” explained Brooks. “In Alameda County, no.”

Brooks said the problem issue is the lead paint used on homes prior to 1978.

“Deteriorated lead-based paint can be found throughout Oakland,” said Brooks. “Most of the homes built in Oakland were built prior to 1980; 90 percent.”

The county’s “Healthy Homes” department educates the public and provides grants to qualifying low-income residents to upgrade homes.

But Brooks believes it’s not just a Fruitvale problem. It is far more widespread.

“Over the last ten years, we’ve treated over 5,000 children for lead poisoning in the county,” said Brooks. “It is still a clear and present danger for children living in aging homes.”

As education on lead poisoning increases, he says so will screening. Health officials might find even more children with elevated level of lead in their blood.

“There is no safe level,” said Brooks. “My goal would be zero percent.”

Alameda County officials say they have over $3 million to help low-income homeowners deal with lead in their home.
Oakland  Fruitvale  lead  child  money  solution 
january 2017 by Quercki
(21) Tur-Ha Ak
Tur-Ha Ak
HEADS UP EYES OPEN!!!!!
U.S. Marshalls, F.B.I., O.P.D. just drove down on the comrade Jabari Shaw
LIVE & DIRECT:
Share · 6 hrs
Fruitvale  police  paratransit  video 
march 2015 by Quercki
Fleeing suspects triggers Oakland collisions; Five injured - FOX 35 News Orlando
OAKLAND (BCN) -- A suspect allegedly fleeing from U.S. marshals was involved in two separate collisions in Oakland Monday, injuring at least five people, authorities said.

The incident occurred at 11:27 a.m. on 23rd Avenue in the city's Fruitvale district. Marshals attempted to detain the driver, who drove away and collided with one of the marshals' vehicles.

The driver continued south on 23rd Avenue into the intersection with Foothill Boulevard, where another collision occurred with a paratransit bus, injuring five people including a 4-year-old, according to police.

Drivers and passengers in both vehicles suffered injuries but were expected to survive.
Fruitvale  police  paratransit 
march 2015 by Quercki
Car fleeing marshals slams into van in Oakland (photos) - SFGate
The man in the Buick was identified in a Facebook video as Jabari Shaw, who blasted the conduct of federal agents. He said on the video that the 4-year-old girl is his daughter.
Palmer said the man seen getting into the Buick “matched the description. That’s why they wanted to contact him.”
But when the marshals surrounded the Buick and got out of their vehicles, the woman drove off, hitting one of the unmarked vehicles and narrowly missing a task force member who had to dive out of the way, Palmer said. “She tried to run him over,” he said.
At the time, the task force members were in plainclothes but were “fully identified with law-enforcement markings,” Watson said.
The woman continued south on 23rd Avenue and ran a red light, crashing into a paratransit van that was traveling east on Foothill Boulevard, Watson said.
The driver, Shaw and his daughter, who was in the back seat of the Buick — without a car seat or seat belts — were taken to hospitals.
The woman driving the paratransit van and two female passengers complained of pain from injuries. One of the passengers was taken to the hospital as a precaution, police said.
Members of the task force — including FBI agents and deputy U.S. marshals — arrived at the scene of the crash to assist Oakland police and firefighters. Watson said the agents were not involved in the crash and weren’t pursuing the Buick before the collision.
Palmer said, “Not only did they not pursue, they didn’t even have a chance to pursue because she took off and got in the accident. Our guys had completely lost (the car) at that point. We didn’t know where she had gone. We didn’t have any cars within three blocks of that accident.”
Shaw, while sitting in the back of a police car, yelled out to onlookers, “They tried to kill me. The police pushed our car into that paratransit car. We tried to stop. We couldn’t stop. The police made that happen. They ran into us at (East) 22nd (Street) and 23rd (Avenue).”
He continued, “My girlfriend hit the gas because she was scared. They was an unmarked vehicle. I recognized the red and blue lights. I told her to stop, but she said, 'They’re going to kill us.’ She tried to keep going. We saw the red light. She tried to stop in the intersection. The police hit the back of the car and pushed us into that car. They could have killed us.”
A federal agent at the scene denied Shaw’s allegations, saying the occupants of the Buick had chosen to flee from U.S. marshals while a girl was in the back seat — with the child’s presence unknown to the agents at the time.
police  Fruitvale  paratransit 
march 2015 by Quercki
Oakland: Car fleeing U.S. Marshals crashes, 5 injured - San Jose Mercury News
OAKLAND -- A car fleeing U.S. Marshals collided with a paratransit van Monday morning in East Oakland, injuring at least five people, including a 4-year-old girl in the getaway vehicle, authorities said.

The incident began about 11:27 a.m., when U.S. Marshals in an unmarked vehicle were looking for a violent fugitive in East Oakland at the request of the Oakland Police Department, said Deputy U.S. Marshal Joseph Palmer. Marshals spotted a man who matched the description of the person being sought and pulled over a Buick sedan. But when the agents got out of the car and approached the vehicle, it rammed the marshal's car and sped off, he said.

The vehicle then ran a red light while driving southbound on 23rd Avenue and struck the paratransit van in the intersection of Foothill Boulevard, Palmer said. The van contained a female driver and two other women.

The woman driving the Buick, her male passenger and the child -- who was not in a car seat or strapped in by a seat belt -- were all taken to a hospital, police said.

"I don't know why they they didn't just stop, but it ended up not being the person we were looking for," Palmer said, adding that agents sometimes make mistakes when trailing suspects. "You never really know if you have the right person until you're talking to them. It's always a judgment call."

But the man in the getaway car disputed the story, saying that another vehicle pushed the Buick into the path of the paratransit van.
police  Fruitvale  paratransit  accident 
march 2015 by Quercki
Federal Marshals Chase Wrong Man Leading to Violent Traffic Accident in Oakland's Fruitvale District | East Bay Express
FTP! "So as the official law enforcement story changes over the next few days, just remember a few things:
The cops were chasing the wrong people.
The cops were not identifiable as cops to the people they were chasing.
The cops rammed the Buick causing it to ram the paratransit van. At least one of the people in the accident will likely never walk again, and all sustained injuries."
police  violence  undercover  accident  injury  Oakland  Fruitvale  FTP 
march 2015 by Quercki
Cherries | Oregon's Agricultural Progress
Bing cherries are an American favorite. But who was Bing?


Bing cherries are an American favorite. But who was Bing?
Back in 1847, before Oregon was a state, an Iowa entrepreneur named Henderson Luelling traveled to Oregon with a wagon full of fruit tree seedlings and, in effect, delivered the tree fruit industry to the West. Henderson’s younger brother, Seth followed in 1850, settling in Milwaukie, Oregon, where he established a commercial tree fruit nursery (and curiously, changed the spelling of his name.)
According to the Oregon Historical Society, Ah Bing was Seth Lewelling’s Manchurian foreman who oversaw 30 Chinese farm workers and helped run the nursery. Accounts differ as to whether it was Seth or Bing who developed the large black sweet cherry variety, but the Bing cherry was developed at the Lewelling nursery and named in honor of the Chinese foreman.
That recognition is especially notable at a time when some Americans felt threatened by the growing presence of Chinese laborers in the workforce. The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 halted immigration from China and sanctioned the deportation of legal residents. Any Chinese Americans who left the country had to obtain stringent certification to re-enter. Bing worked for Seth for 35 years, the length of his contract, and in 1889 he returned to China. He did not return to the United States.
But the cherry he helped to cultivate is still today the most produced variety of sweet cherry in the U.S.
Bing_cherry  cherry  Fruitvale  history 
december 2013 by Quercki
Bing cherries are an American favorite. But who was Bing?
Bing cherries are an American favorite. But who was Bing?

Back in 1847, before Oregon was a state, an Iowa entrepreneur named Henderson Luelling traveled to Oregon with a wagon full of fruit tree seedlings and, in effect, delivered the tree fruit industry to the West. Henderson’s younger brother, Seth followed in 1850, settling in Milwaukie, Oregon, where he established a commercial tree fruit nursery (and curiously, changed the spelling of his name.)

According to the Oregon Historical Society, Ah Bing was Seth Lewelling’s Manchurian foreman who oversaw 30 Chinese farm workers and helped run the nursery. Accounts differ as to whether it was Seth or Bing who developed the large black sweet cherry variety, but the Bing cherry was developed at the Lewelling nursery and named in honor of the Chinese foreman.

That recognition is especially notable at a time when some Americans felt threatened by the growing presence of Chinese laborers in the workforce. The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 halted immigration from China and sanctioned the deportation of legal residents. Any Chinese Americans who left the country had to obtain stringent certification to re-enter. Bing worked for Seth for 35 years, the length of his contract, and in 1889 he returned to China. He did not return to the United States.

But the cherry he helped to cultivate is still today the most produced variety of sweet cherry in the U.S.

Read the full story at http://oregonprogress.oregonstate.edu/fall-2009/cherries
Oakland  Bing_cherry  cherry  history  Fruitvale 
december 2013 by Quercki
Sundance Proves A Filmmaking Renaissance Is Happening In The Bay Area | Truly Free Film
What would Variety, Hollywood Reporter, IndieWire, The Wrap, MovieCityNews, Filmmaker Magazine & Deadline report if a single film company took the following awards at Sundance this year?

Narrative Grand Jury Prize
Audience Award For Narrative Film
Best Directing of a Narrative Film
Best Directing of a Documentary Film
Special Jury Award For Documentary Film #1
Special Jury Award For Documentary Film #2
I can’t help but think they would announce the arrival of a powerhouse.

Well, allow me the pleasure of breaking such an announcement.  In case you missed it: a filmmaking renaissance is happening in The Bay Area.  All of the following films that premiered at Sundance and won an award there had a major Bay Area connection: Fruitvale, Afternoon Delight, Cutie and the Boxer, Inequality For All, and American Promise.

I don’t know when was the last time a film won both the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at Sundance as Fruitvale did this year.  Not only is director Ryan Coogler from Oakland, not only was the story and subject from The Bay Area, not only was the film shot in The Bay Area, and not only was it mixed at Skywalker, but the San Francisco Film Society & The Kenneth Rainin Foundation granted the film $200,000.

If that wasn’t enough to crow about, allow me the thrill of mentioning that this is the second year in a row that a film supported by the San Francisco Film Society & The Kenneth Rainin Foundation won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance.  Yup, Beasts Of The Southern Wild received similar support last year as Fruitvale did this year.  Do we need non-profit support in order to make ambitious socially relevant cinema in America?  It sure damn looks that way, and if it is not necessary, it sure helps!  A market-driven entertainment economy encourages one thing; if we want diversity we must support our cultural institutions (and build new ones!).
Oscar_Grant  Oakland  Fruitvale  film  award 
january 2013 by Quercki
Lavish creations honor cycle of life and death at Fruitvale’s Dia de Los Muertos | Oakland North
Dia de Los Muertos, which means Day of the Dead, is a Mexican holiday with roots in an Aztec celebration of the goddess Mictecacihuatl, queen of the underworld. The festivities take place on November 2, the day after the Catholic celebration of All Souls Day. (This year, Oakland celebrated about a week early.) Participants in Fruitvale constructed intricate altars filled with colorful objects—pictures of the deceased, skulls that honor their ancestors, fruit, candles and marigolds, to name just a few. The back of the altar often featured a circle, or sunrise, to symbolize the cycle of human life and death. Once the altars were complete, people set up chairs inside their lavish creations, explained the altars’ significance to passersby, and occasionally got up to go pay a visit to their neighbors.

While many festival participants in Oakland set up altars that honored the dead, another segment of the Mexican American community used Dia de Los Muertos to make a statement. One group of young people set up an altar in protest of the gang injunctions passed in Oakland. Another woman used her altar space as a “prayer” for the health of the world’s oceans—she decorated it with hand-drawn pictures of mermaids.
Dia_de_Los_Muertos  Oakland  Fruitvale  Samhain 
october 2012 by Quercki
Fruitvale – Oakland, CA.
another Oakland blog --low posting rate
oakland  blog  Fruitvale 
september 2009 by Quercki

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