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Quercki : land   18

Yurok Tribe Reacquires 50,000 Acres of Forest - Native Business Magazine
For decades, the Yurok Tribe witnessed the degradation of their ancestral territory. Their solution to protect one of the most biologically rich areas on Earth? To own it.

The Tribe has purchased approximately 50,000 acres of forest surrounding four salmon sustaining streams, including Blue Creek, the lifeline of the Klamath River. The acquisition contributes to the Yurok Tribe’s efforts to increase resiliency to climate change through carbon sequestration and sustainable forest management.
Yurok  land  purchase  protect  California  Native_American 
8 weeks ago by Quercki
Forest management company returns 50,000 acres of land to Yurok Tribe | KRCR
KLAMATH, Calif. — Green Diamond and Western Rivers Conservancy have agreed to return tens of thousands of acres of ancestral lands to the Yurok Tribe.

On Monday, Aug. 19, the Yurok Tribe, Green Diamond Resource Company and Western Rivers Conservancy will celebrate a decade-long, hard-won effort to preserve and place into tribal ownership approximately 50,000 acres of forest surrounding four salmon sustaining streams, including Blue Creek, according to tribal leaders.

“It is a good day for the Yurok people,” Joseph L. James, the Chairman of the Yurok Tribe said. “On behalf of the Yurok Tribe, I would like thank Green Diamond and Western Rivers for assisting us in the reacquisition of a significant part of our ancestral territory and putting us in a position to permanently protect the Blue Creek watershed, which is the crown jewel of the Klamath River. These organizations have stood by us every step of the way during this 10-year project.”

A celebration will be held Monday, Aug. 19 at 10 a.m. at the Yurok Headquarters at 190 Klamath Blvd.
Klamath  CA  Yurok  Indian  land  return  Native_American 
9 weeks ago by Quercki
Forest management company returns 50,000 acres of land to Yurok Tribe | KRCR
KLAMATH, Calif. — Green Diamond and Western Rivers Conservancy have agreed to return tens of thousands of acres of ancestral lands to the Yurok Tribe.

On Monday, Aug. 19, the Yurok Tribe, Green Diamond Resource Company and Western Rivers Conservancy will celebrate a decade-long, hard-won effort to preserve and place into tribal ownership approximately 50,000 acres of forest surrounding four salmon sustaining streams, including Blue Creek, according to tribal leaders.

“It is a good day for the Yurok people,” Joseph L. James, the Chairman of the Yurok Tribe said. “On behalf of the Yurok Tribe, I would like thank Green Diamond and Western Rivers for assisting us in the reacquisition of a significant part of our ancestral territory and putting us in a position to permanently protect the Blue Creek watershed, which is the crown jewel of the Klamath River. These organizations have stood by us every step of the way during this 10-year project.”

A celebration will be held Monday, Aug. 19 at 10 a.m. at the Yurok Headquarters at 190 Klamath Blvd.
Native_American  California  Yurok  land 
9 weeks ago by Quercki
My plan for public lands – Team Warren – Medium
It is wrong to prioritize corporate profits over the health and safety of our local communities. That’s why on my first day as president, I will sign an executive order that says no more drilling — a total moratorium on all new fossil fuel leases, including for drilling offshore and on public lands....
As president, I will use my authorities under the Antiquities Act to restore protections to both monuments [bear ear and Grand Staircase Excalante] and any other national monuments targeted by this Administration....
I will recruit 10,000 young people and veterans to jumpstart a 21st Century Civilian Conservation Corps — ...
It’s time for the Department of Interior to meaningfully incorporate the role of state, local, and tribal stakeholders in the management of public lands. The administration of public lands should incorporate tribes’ traditional ecological knowledge, making provisions for tribal culture and customs on public lands, and exploring co-management and the return of resources to indigenous protection wherever possible.
Elizabeth_Warren  parks  public  land  recreation  mininin  Native_American 
june 2019 by Quercki
Australian Aboriginals to get billions in compensation for land & spiritual loss in landmark case — RT World News
Aboriginals in Australia have won a ground-breaking case that paves the way for billions of dollars in compensation claims for colonial land loss, as well as loss of spiritual connection.

The High Court of Australia ruled in favor of the Ngaliwurru and Nungali groups from the Northern Territory in the biggest ‘native title’ ruling on indigenous rights to traditional land and water in decades on Wednesday.

It said the Northern Territory government was to pay $2.53mn in damages to the Ngaliwurru and Nungali groups for an earlier federal court ruling which found the NT government “extinguished” their native title rights when they built infrastructure on their land in the 80s and 90s.

Around $1.3 million of the damages was awarded for spiritual or cultural harm, which both the Northern Territory and federal governments argued was excessive.

The High Court ruled on Wednesday that the $1.3mn “was not manifestly excessive and was not inconsistent with acceptable community standards.” It was the first time the high court considered the monetary value of the removal of land rights, including economic loss and loss of spiritual connection.
Australia  Aboriginal  indigenous  land  spiritual  rights 
march 2019 by Quercki
Native Women Reclaim Land Plot by Plot, by Julian Brave NoiseCat
In the land of the San Francisco liberal, Berkeley hippy and Oakland radical, support for this indigenous cause is perhaps unsurprising. “In general, it’s beautiful that we are in the Bay Area because we get all of this support,” Gould remarked.

But against a deeper backdrop of land theft, genocide, patriarchy and skyrocketing land prices that make justice more expensive, Gould and LaRose’s woman-led project feels cutting-edge, even transformative.

Beth Rose Middleton, a professor at the University of California, Davis, and board member of Sogorea Te, said land trusts — typically used by private conservationists — can serve as tools for decolonization. For tribes like the Ohlone, which do not benefit from federal recognition and have no reservation lands, land trusts can be especially powerful. Gould and LaRose are using the master’s tools to dismantle the master’s house.

“These tools can be used in ways never imagined in the colonial time they were created,” Middleton said. “You are almost taking [land] out of this capitalist regime to bring it into indigenous ownership.”
Ohlone  land  trust  Shuumi  Sogorea_Te  *** 
december 2018 by Quercki
The Coming Home Song: Wiyot People Joyous as Eureka City Council Takes Another Step Towards Returning Indian Island – Redheaded Blackbelt
Last night, the Eureka City Council unanimously voted to make the next step in returning 202 acres of Indian Island, located between the city and the Samoa peninsula, to the Wiyot people.

The property was declared “surplus” which allows it to eventually be transferred back to the local tribe which considers the area sacred.

In 2000, the Wiyot’s purchased about 1 and a half acres and after cleanup and restoration performed the World Renewal Ceremony there in March of 2014. The last time previous to that the ceremony had been performed was in February of 1860 when the mostly women and children staying at the ceremony site were massacred at night by a group of local white men.

One speaker said that the City of Eureka will be the first in the entire United States to return Sacred land to an Indigenous people without being forced to do so by a court order.

At the meeting last night, Wiyot’s sang their Coming Home song, before the historic Eureka City Council vote.
California  Eureka  Native_American  Indian  land  return  song  video 
december 2018 by Quercki
Sacred Homelands Returned to Wiyot Tribe | Cultural Survival
Sacred Homelands Returned to Wiyot Tribe

The Eureka, California, City Council has returned 40 acres of Indian Island to the Wiyot Tribe, who had lost the land in an 1860 massacre. The tribe, city council, and local community celebrated the unanimous and unprecedented decision at a signing ceremony on June 25.

During the ceremony, Tribal Chairwoman Cheryl A. Seidner gave smoked salmon, shell necklaces, and medicine bags to the city council members, and Mayor Peter La Vallee gave Seidner a symbolic clay pot of soil from the island.

"This is the first time that I know of that a municipality has done something like this of their own free will, no money involved, just because it’s the right thing to do," said Wiyot Tribal Administrator Maura Eastman in a phone interview. "The community was incredibly receptive to the idea. It really wouldn’t have happened without all the people involved. It could happen every place."
California  Native_American  Indian  land  return  Eureka 
december 2018 by Quercki
City Council Agenda - blobdload.aspx
A.3.
Indian Island Property Surplus
Recommendation: Hold a public hearing; and
Adopt the Negative Declaration and direct staff to file a Notice of Determination (NOD); and
Adopt a Resolution of the City Council declaring the City
-
owned portion of Indian Island
(APN 405
-
011
-
011) as surplus property and directing the City Manager to ne
gotiate the
conveyance of APN 405
-
011
-
011 on Indian Island.
California  Indian  Native_American  land  return  Eureka  City_Council 
december 2018 by Quercki
Eureka to Discuss Return of Indian Island to Wiyot People | KHSU
The island has a brutal history of its original native population being massacred by white settlers in 1860. According to the council’s agenda, city officials plan to hold the public hearing on the return of Indian Island and also adopt a resolution where they will negotiate the transfer.

In 2000 the Wiyot Tribe purchased the 1.5 acres of Indian Island through grassroots efforts and in 2004, the tribe had recieved more than 40 acres from the city of Eureka. More than a decade later, the Eureka City Council unanimously decided to retrun the rest of the parcel to the Wiyot People.
California  Indian  Native_American  Eureka  land  return 
december 2018 by Quercki
White Wolf : Australia returns 50,000 hectares of land to Aboriginals.
Australia returns 50,000 hectares of land to Aboriginals.

An aboriginal tribe in Australia have been granted their native land back, after what has become one of the most protracted and fraught land battles in Australian history.

The Larrakia Aboriginal people are the traditional owners of the Darwin region, spanning most of the Cox peninsula.

The Larrakia people have had the longest-running claim on the land, known as the Kenbi Land Claim; Dating as far back as 1789 the claim has been through two hearings, three federal court reviews, and two High Court appeals.

The 37-year long dispute was settled in April, transferring ownership of the land from Australias federal and territory governments to a group of Larrakia Aboriginal people.

Today, the final agreement, which consists of 55,000 hectares, was handed back to the Larrakia people by Australias Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull.


Today we formally recognise what Larrakia people have always known, that this is Aboriginal land, that this is that lands of the Larrakia people. I acknowledge that Larrakia people have cared for this country for tens of thousands of years, that your songs have been sung since time out of mind. And those songs have held and passed on the knowledge of your customs, your traditions, your law and I pay my deepest respects to you and your elders, past and present, Turnbull said at the ceremony.
Australia  Indigenous  land  returned  Aboriginal 
november 2018 by Quercki
Tolay Lake Regional Park, co-managed by county and Graton Rancheria tribe, opening Oct. 27
Tolay Lake Regional Park, the largest in the Sonoma County park system, will open for daily public use late this month, marking a much-celebrated occasion that’s been 13 years in the making.

The park opening on Oct. 27 will lift the veil on hidden scenic treasures, miles of trails, diverse wildlife and hallowed aboriginal healing grounds — all of it mostly off-limits to the general public up to this point.

At 3,400 acres, “it’s a massive land base and an important ecological preserve for the county,” Regional Parks Director Bert Whitaker said. “And it has amazing cultural history.”
California  Native_American  land  park  management 
october 2018 by Quercki
Miwok Archaeological Preserve of Marin (MAPOM) - Posts
Miwok Archaeological Preserve of Marin (MAPOM)
October 11 at 11:47 AM ·

Incredible long term effort and commitment to make this Park/Tribe collaboration come to life. The Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria (Coast Miwok/Pomo) partnered and invested with the Sonoma County Park system to open the largest park in the county! Hope this is the beginning of many more to come!
california  Native_American  land  park 
october 2018 by Quercki
Land Report 2017 Legacy Landowner: Ted Turner | The Land Report
Bison are sexy. They’re in vogue. But bison are really a means to take our grass crop and market it or monetize it. Let’s broaden that out a little bit. It’s not grass we’re monetizing. It’s habitat. How we manage these properties makes the habitat on them, the forage, and the soils underneath the forage either more vibrant, more resilient, and more diverse, or less. That is the basis of our management of Turner Ranches. We do spend a lot of time talking about bison and bison production, but at the core of what we do, it’s really all about the habitat,” Kossler says.

Yet it’s only when Kossler shares a second anecdote that the Turner Ranches’ mission statement and its balance of commerce and conservation comes into focus.

“A year ago, we had a catastrophic fire on the Z Bar Ranch in Kansas. It encompassed 450,000 acres and burned off 96 percent of the Z Bar. Our bison herd there is 800 cows and a complement of yearlings and breeding bulls. But we lost just six animals. Why so few? Because of our prairie dogs. By nature, prairie dogs overgraze. That’s why so many ranchers consider them pests. They kill off perennial vegetation and leave bare ground and burrows. Which is why the bison went to the prairie dog town. They hunkered down where there was no grass to burn, and the fire blew right around them. It was hot and fast moving, and the losses could have been sky-high. But we manage for habitat, and on the Z Bar, that includes non-commodity species like prairie dogs,” he says.
bison  buffalo  prairie_dogs  fire  environment  land  habitat 
december 2017 by Quercki
Indigenous women lead effort to reclaim ancestral lands - San Francisco Chronicle
the land was put into a cultural easement. But it did not return to Ohlone stewardship. That’s when Gould realized that if the Ohlone had a land trust — a legal mechanism to collectively own property — they might have been able to get the easement themselves.

She and LaRose also noticed that while land trusts have been used by American Indians for decades, none of them were led by women. “Not just to say that they’re led by men,” LaRose says, “but to say that, as women, we have an obligation to protect the land and care for the land in a way I think men maybe might not quite understand.”

Gould and LaRose drew up a map of some 200 properties throughout Oakland, either owned by the city, abandoned or neglected or under a lien. “We just sort of penciled them out and said, ‘What if there’s a way we could secure these pieces of land?’” LaRose says. And so the Sogorea Te Land Trust was created — a land trust on Ohlone territory, to buy back Ohlone territory, but one that is led by women and open to all indigenous people.
Ohlone  Sogorea_Te  land  trust  Native_American  Oakland  Corrina_Gould 
november 2017 by Quercki
A displaced California tribe reclaims sacred land (The Exact Same Place) — High Country News
After more than a decade of trying, the Mountain Maidu, a small and federally unrecognized tribe, had reclaimed title to Humbug Valley from Pacific Gas & Electric Company. It had been a long saga: A judge in the early aughts, in the wake of the Enron scandal, ordered the utility to relinquish thousands of acres to conservation stewards. But PG&E did not consider the Mountain Maidu potential stewards. Like other outsiders, company representatives dismissed the Maidu as a loose band, a tribe without a central government and — until now — without a land base.

The Maidu were undeterred. They formed a nonprofit consortium, weaseled their way into meetings and recruited allies. They tackled on-the-ground projects — building cedar fences to protect gravesites and designing an interpretive kiosk, all as directed by a PG&E-appointed committee, in order to prove their ability to be good stewards on land they’d already tended for centuries.
California  Native_American  Maidu  sacred  land  DeColonize 
september 2015 by Quercki
Proposed Bill Would Save Sacred Native American Site From Mining
H.R.2811, otherwise known as the Save Oak Flat Act, seeks to repeal the provisions under the National Defense Authorization Act that provided for a land exchange between the Department of Agriculture and Resolution Copper Mining, LLC.

The land in question is Oak Flat, a site that holds spiritual significance to the San Carlos Apache Tribe.

Previously, the San Carlos Apache cited religious freedom in an attempt to protect the land, which includes Apache Leap, where 75 Apache men, women, and children were massacred.


Interestingly enough, it was a champion of “religious freedom” who pushed to allow the foreign mining company to mine the site – John McCain.
Native_American  mining  sacred  land  John_McCain  Apache 
september 2015 by Quercki
Protecting Ohlone Heritage | East Bay Express
A fundamental problem was that the indigenous people who led the occupation lack federal recognition as Native Americans. In addition, the federal recognition process administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs involves an infamous level of stonewalling. For example, the Muwekma Ohlone of the Bay Area are among more than one hundred tribes engaged in a protracted recognition process with the bureau, and there's no guarantee that they'll be successful.

So defenders of Sogorea Te have elected to pursue a different course to protect sacred sites: to create the first women-led, urban indigenous land trust in the United States.

"If we'd had a land trust during Sogorea Te, we would been the partners rather than the Yocha Dehe," explained Corrina Gould, who, as a Chochenyo Ohlone woman, has an ancestral lineage in the East Bay that dates back at least 13,000 years. "The ancestors were saying, 'You didn't have this tool in your tool belt then, so now we're going to give it to you.'"

The land trust will be a nonprofit that acquires and protects land with cultural value to the Ohlone and other indigenous people. But just as the Sogorea Te occupation brought together people from many cultural backgrounds, the land trust will create opportunities for people from various walks of life to develop a more active relationship with a land base.

The journey toward creating the land trust is the subject of a new documentary entitled Beyond Recognition, from Underexposed Films. It screens at San Jose's Cinequest Film Festival on March 7. The film will also be broadcast on PBS affiliate KRCB Channel 22 on March 16 at 7:30 p.m., in honor of Women's History Month.
Ohlone  bayarea  land  Corrina_Gould  film 
march 2015 by Quercki

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