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Quercki : segregation   6

Sausalito agrees to desegregate schools after state attorney general's findings - SFGate
Just two taxpayer-funded schools serve the quaint town of Sausalito, California. There's a charter school where a plurality of the students are white, and a traditional district school where almost no one is.

That's no accident, according to California's attorney general, who alleges the school district knowingly created and maintained a segregated school, and starved it of funding needed for basic necessities while funneling extra money to the charter school.

On Friday, the Sausalito Marin City School District agreed to a settlement that orders officials to unravel the segregation, compensate graduates who were harmed by it and build a more equitable system. If the district fails, the charter school might lose its Sausalito campus.

"Every child - no matter their stripe or stature - deserves equal access to a quality education," California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement. "That's what we say, what we believe, and what's required under the law. But what we say isn't always what we do. Certainly, it's not what the Sausalito Marin City School District did when it chose to segregate its students."
race  segregation  Sausalito  Marin  schools  charter  CA  Attorney_General  Xavier_Becerra  2019 
8 weeks ago by Quercki
The Real Origins of the Religious Right - POLITICO Magazine
Baptists, in particular, applauded the decision as an appropriate articulation of the division between church and state, between personal morality and state regulation of individual behavior. “Religious liberty, human equality and justice are advanced by the Supreme Court abortion decision,” wrote W. Barry Garrett of Baptist Press.

***

So what then were the real origins of the religious right? It turns out that the movement can trace its political roots back to a court ruling, but not Roe v. Wade.

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In May 1969, a group of African-American parents in Holmes County, Mississippi, sued the Treasury Department to prevent three new whites-only K-12 private academies from securing full tax-exempt status, arguing that their discriminatory policies prevented them from being considered “charitable” institutions. The schools had been founded in the mid-1960s in response to the desegregation of public schools set in motion by the Brown v. Board of Education decision of 1954. In 1969, the first year of desegregation, the number of white students enrolled in public schools in Holmes County dropped from 771 to 28; the following year, that number fell to zero.

In  Green v. Kennedy (David Kennedy was secretary of the treasury at the time), decided in January 1970, the plaintiffs won a preliminary injunction, which denied the “segregation academies” tax-exempt status until further review.
evangelical  Christian  right  history  abortion  racism  segregation  politics 
october 2017 by Quercki
It Wasn’t Abortion That Formed the Religious Right. It Was Support for Segregation.
The modern religious right formed, practically overnight, as a rapid response to the Supreme Court's landmark ruling in Roe v. Wade. Or, at least, that's how the story goes. The reality, Randall Balmer, a Dartmouth professor writing for Politico Magazine, says, is actually a little less savory to 21st century Americans: The religious right, who liked to call themselves the "moral majority" at the time, actually organized around fighting to protect Christian schools from being desegregated. It wasn't Roe v. Wade that woke the sleeping dragon of the evangelical vote. It was Green v. Kennedy, a 1970 decision stripping tax-exempt status from "segregation academies"—private Christian schools that were set up in response to Brown v. Board of Education, where the practice of barring black students continued. 
abortion  segregation  discrimination  politics  religion 
february 2017 by Quercki
Living Apart: How the Government Betrayed a Landmark Civil Rights Law - ProPublica
A few months after Congress passed a landmark law directing the federal government to dismantle segregation in the nation's housing, President Nixon's housing chief began plotting a stealth campaign.

The plan, George Romney wrote in a confidential memo to aides, was to use his power as secretary of Housing and Urban Development to remake America's housing patterns, which he described as a "high-income white noose" around the black inner city.

E-book
"Living Apart" is available as an e-book with an exclusive afterword by Nikole Hannah-Jones and documents from the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and the George Romney Papers.
The 1968 Fair Housing Act, passed months earlier in the tumultuous aftermath of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination, directed the government to "affirmatively further" fair housing. Romney believed those words gave him the authority to pressure predominantly white communities to build more affordable housing and end discriminatory zoning practices.

Romney ordered HUD officials to reject applications for water, sewer and highway projects from cities and states where local policies fostered segregated housing.
segregation  housing  racism  policy  HUD  solutions  african-american 
october 2012 by Quercki
Infographic of the Day: How Segregated is Your City? | Fast Company
Rankin created the mapping methodology because he was frustrated with the way racial boundaries continue to be mapped. Usually, ethnic neighborhoods are shown as homogeneous, sharply bounded swathes of color. But obviously, living in a city tells a much different story -- and the nature of the boundary areas are at least as important to the identity of any city.
demographics  race  oakland  photo  segregation  visualization 
september 2010 by Quercki

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