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Classmate Says Dayton Shooter Connor Betts Targeted Her in High School: ‘We Predicted He Would Do This’
Jessica Masseth was months into her sophomore year at Bellbrook High School in Ohio when she started getting disturbing text messages from a freshman named Connor Betts.

Betts texted that Masseth was on his “rape list,” describing in detail “what he wanted to do” to her, she said—even sending her the list of all of his proposed victims to prove she wasn’t the only one.

Finally, Masseth said she had enough and went to the police.

“I was not surprised at all when I heard his name on the news yesterday,” she said. “We predicted he would do this 10 years ago.”
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Police said they do not have a motive for Betts’ deadly rampage, but Masseth, other classmates, and ex-girlfriends said he expressed violent attitudes going back a decade.
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Police said Betts arrived in Dayton’s downtown entertainment district Saturday night in his father’s car with with his younger sister, Megan, and a male acquaintance. Betts fatally shot his sister and wounded the acquaintance, who survived, police said. The acquaintance is not suspected to have played a role in the attack, officials say.
massacre  domestic_violence  warning  ignored  rape  police  baffled  sister 
10 weeks ago by Quercki
Essay on why a professor is adding a trigger warning to his syllabus | Inside Higher Ed
in my experience a well-written title and lead paragraph can usually do the job more effectively and less obtrusively.
A classroom environment is different, though, for a few reasons. First, it’s a shared space — for the 75 minutes of the class session and the 15 weeks of the semester, we’re pretty much all stuck with one another, and that fact imposes interpersonal obligations on us that don’t exist between writer and reader. Second, it’s an interactive space — it’s a conversation, not a monologue, and I have a responsibility to encourage that conversation as best I can. Finally, it’s an unpredictable space — a lot of my students have never previously encountered some of the material we cover in my classes, or haven’t encountered it in the way it’s taught at the college level, and don’t have any clear sense of what to expect.
For all these reasons, I’ve concluded that it would be sound pedagogy for me to give my students notice about some of the challenging material we’ll be covering in class — material relating to racial and sexual oppression, for instance, and to ethnic and religious conflict — as well as some information about their rights and responsibilities in responding to it.
content_note  trigger  warning  education  culture 
december 2015 by Quercki

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