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aries1988 : 1970s   4

The First Time I Met Americans - The New York Times
Children 16 and younger were evacuated to the countryside, separated from their parents. It was not so different from the experiences of British children in London in 1940, but the children of Hanoi endured all of this much longer — from 1964 to 1973 — and our life during wartime was tougher.

I didn’t think we would win a victory like my father’s generation had at Dien Bien Phu, and I also understood that the Americans were many times stronger than the French. But I strongly believed, as did most of my comrades, what President Ho had told us many times — that eventually the United States would give up and go home.

I don’t know the overall survival statistics, but out of the 25 boys from my high school who went to war, 11 were killed. Of the three young men from my apartment building in Hanoi who enlisted with me, I was the only one to return.
story  soldier  vietnam  war  1970s  american  literature  usa 
november 2017 by aries1988
The Chinese-Canadian urban immigrant experience, narrated by a clever pre-teen | Aeon Videos
My Name is Susan Yee, by the Academy Award-winning Canadian director Beverly Shaffer, is a beguilingly straightforward short documentary from 1975 that manages to weave a surprisingly rich set of themes into a chronicle of a young girl’s daily life. Yee, a first generation Chinese-Canadian girl, is gently precocious, frequently funny and an excellent guide through the diverse Montreal community where she lives. The film follows her about as she comments with a child’s frankness on Montreal’s weather, demographics, dramatic urban and social change, and winter leisure-time activities. She’s also an astute observer of family life and the dynamics at school, offering droll observations on her parents’ worries and witty comments about classmates and teachers. Entertaining and insightful in equal measure, this affable film breezes by as it shares the charms and complexities of Yee’s life in the city.
canada  quebec  chinese  immigrant  story  1970s  video  daily  life 
october 2017 by aries1988

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