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Have You Ever Tried to Sell a Diamond? - The Atlantic
De Beers proved to be the most successful cartel arrangement in the annals of modern commerce. While other commodities, such as gold, silver, copper, rubber, and grains, fluctuated wildly in response to economic conditions, diamonds have continued, with few exceptions, to advance upward in price every year since the Depression. Indeed, the cartel seemed so superbly in control of prices -- and unassailable -- that, in the late 1970s, even speculators began buying diamonds as a guard against the vagaries of inflation and recession.

To stabilize the market, De Beers had to endow these stones with a sentiment that would inhibit the public from ever reselling them. The illusion had to be created that diamonds were forever -- "forever" in the sense that they should never be resold.

Specifically, the Ayer study stressed the need to strengthen the association in the public's mind of diamonds with romance. Since "young men buy over 90% of all engagement rings" it would be crucial to inculcate in them the idea that diamonds were a gift of love: the larger and finer the diamond, the greater the expression of love. Similarly, young women had to be encouraged to view diamonds as an integral part of any romantic courtship.

"We spread the word of diamonds worn by stars of screen and stage, by wives and daughters of political leaders, by any woman who can make the grocer's wife and the mechanic's sweetheart say 'I wish I had what she has.'"

N. W. Ayer proposed to apply to the diamond market Thorstein Veblen's idea, stated in The Theory of the Leisure Class, that Americans were motivated in their purchases not by utility but by "conspicuous consumption."

The message was clear: diamonds represent a sharp break with the Oriental past and a sign of entry into modern life.

DeBeers devised the "eternity ring," made up of as many as twenty-five tiny Soviet diamonds, which could be sold to an entirely new market of older married women. The advertising campaign was based on the theme of recaptured love. Again, sentiments were born out of necessity: older American women received a ring of miniature diamonds because of the needs of a South African corporation to accommodate the Soviet Union.
business  advertising  jewelry  diamond  marriage  tv  marketing  usa  japan  mentality  psychology  story  success 
october 2017 by aries1988
Branded in Memory
The bite, which is the logo's most iconic feature, was included for scale, so the apple wouldn't be mistaken for a cherry.

Starbucks' current logo, introduced in 2011, is a streamlined version of the two-tailed siren. It no longer features the "Starbucks Coffee" text and is pure green, as opposed to green and black. Despite this simplification, only 6 percent of people drew a near perfect Starbucks logo from memory.

The question at the heart of this experiment is "How accurately can we recall logos we see on a daily basis?" The results show that most people are very good at recalling brand colors – around 80 percent selected the correct palettes for their drawings, while shapes and elements in logos are harder to recall.

There was, however, a difference by age. On average, younger people drew more accurate logos than older people. This was true across almost all brands, but was most noticeable for 7-Eleven, Burger King, and Adidas. Walmart was least affected by age, showing no difference between younger and older groups.

Confidence scaled with accuracy, so while people in general overestimated how well they did, those who did best had the best awareness of their ability.
logo  design  advertising  fun  comparison  data  memory  poll  infographics  analysis 
october 2017 by aries1988
大圣归来,不是祖国需要,是需要祖国
据杭州市统计局和人才办的数据显示,2013年至今,杭州累计引进海外精英专才2.3万人。

中国科技精英多年来源源不断流往西方的潮流正在发生逆转。中国与全球化智库和智联卓聘联合发布的「2015中国海归就业创业调查」报告显示,截至2014年,中国留学回国累计总人数逾180万,占出国人员累计总人数的51.4%,归国人数历史性首度超过出国人数。

北京、上海、深圳,仍是高端科技精英的首选,但越来越多优秀华人工程师们已经、正在、以及开始发现杭州这座1.5线小城里的大天地。在「硅谷帮」的「势力版图」上,杭州这匹黑马再次打破了北上广深的一线格局。
2016  hangzhou  china  talent  student  advertising  siliconvalley  innovation  it  future 
november 2016 by aries1988
Why We Like What We Like
In short, tastes are overdetermined, the upshot of many influences, and underdetermined, susceptible to change at, for example, the sight of the word toasted. Some combination of inputs including, but not limited to, reasons, hunches, bodily needs, past experiences, unconscious desires, social pressures, mystic chords of memory, and price point is behind every preference; they are weighted differently in almost every case; and they are highly malleable.

Still, Heffernan believes that we are living through a revolution. The Internet is the great masterpiece of civilization, she says. As an idea it rivals monotheism. And: If it’s ever fair to say that anything has ‘changed everything,’ it’s fair to say so about the Internet. Analog is dead. To understand the new regime, she argues, we need a new aesthetics, a new hierarchy of values. This is what she proposes to provide.

It might be the sensation that sites like those are incomprehensibly large, that we can never exhaust them. Ultimate unreadability is part of the aura of the Internet itself, the postmodern sublime, to use a term that Heffernan avoids. I can’t see all the books in a library at the same time, but I can go outside and look at the building. The Internet is a building that you can never look at.

Vanderbilt is able to identify two factors that have repeatedly been shown to have a significant influence on taste. One is social consensus; the other is familiarity. We get attracted to things that we see other people are attracted to, and we like things more the longer we like them.
taste  human  book  ad  internet  aesthetics  art  advertising  instapaper_favs 
june 2016 by aries1988

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