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aries1988 : austria   7

A new museum captures Austria’s ambivalence about its past - The story of a horse
Most Austrians saw Austria as an aberration, cut off from its wheat in the east, its port on the Adriatic and the industry of Bohemia; the Allies denied their wish to join a “greater Germany”.

“We see ourselves as a forum for debate,” says Monika Sommer, the director. “We are quite comfortable with showing that there isn’t always one view on history.” She hopes that exhibits like the Waldheim-Pferd will prove to be “friction points” that galvanise discussion. There are bound to be controversies, she acknowledges. The museum’s aim is to provide a stage on which to air them, perhaps even to forge a new consensus.
austria  ww2  victim  history  narrative  museum  travel 
november 2018 by aries1988
« Si l’Autriche avait assumé son passé, elle se serait engagée dans une autre voie »
Pourtant, affirmait Lacan, « la répétition demande du nouveau ». Un aphorisme à méditer dans la situation actuelle. En effet, qu’est-ce qui ne passe pas dans l’histoire autrichienne depuis l’Anschluss, pour faire ainsi turbiner cette compulsion de répétition que Freud n’hésitait pas à qualifier de démoniaque ? Un grand vide : l’absence de l’acte politique qui aurait confronté les Autrichiens avec ce qu’ils ont fait entre 1938 et 1945. A la différence du laborieux travail de mémoire en Allemagne, cette confrontation a, on le sait, été évitée en Autriche grâce à un tour de passe-passe : l’invasion du pays par Hitler prouverait que les Autrichiens ont été les victimes, et non pas les complices, voire les agents, de nombreux crimes !
austria  history  today 
january 2018 by aries1988
Salzburg: snow, strudel and ‘Silent night’
Tradition dictates that the carol is not sung at any point of the year until this moment. In Oberndorf’s chapel square, the thousands-strong throng of devotees will join in with the words, as no doubt will the wider audience all around the world who are watching live online (at stillenacht.info). The song, first performed here 199 years ago, has been recognised by Unesco as part of Austria’s “intangible cultural heritage” and has been translated into 300 languages. It is also the inspiration for no fewer than three museums in the surrounding area.Tradition dictates that the carol is not sung at any point of the year until this moment. In Oberndorf’s chapel square, the thousands-strong throng of devotees will join in with the words, as no doubt will the wider audience all around the world who are watching live online (at stillenacht.info). The song, first performed here 199 years ago, has been recognised by Unesco as part of Austria’s “intangible cultural heritage” and has been translated into 300 languages. It is also the inspiration for no fewer than three museums in the surrounding area.

Back in Oberndorf, home of the Silent Night chapel, the town’s new Silent Night museum has got around the prohibition by installing a soundproofed karaoke booth, so that you can sing along in your own language without offending anyone’s sensibilities.

Salzburg itself, with a Christmas museum, two year-round Christmas shops and regular snowfall, manages to perpetuate that Christmassy feeling long after the festive season has ended. It’s a place of cupolas and belfries, of Renaissance and Baroque city squares, with sonorous church bells measuring out the onward march of time. It feels tailor-made for winter weekend breaks.

Almost entirely car-free, the old town sits on the west bank of the Salzach, backed by wooded hills and towered over by Hohensalzburg, the largest and best-preserved castle in central Europe. Visitors can reach it via funicular railway, then tour the medieval rooms of the powerful prince-archbishops who ran Salzburg as a wealthy independent city state until 1805, when it was subsumed into the Austrian empire.

Back in Oberndorf, home of the Silent Night chapel, the town’s new Silent Night museum has got around the prohibition by installing a soundproofed karaoke booth, so that you can sing along in your own language without offending anyone’s sensibilities.

Salzburg itself, with a Christmas museum, two year-round Christmas shops and regular snowfall, manages to perpetuate that Christmassy feeling long after the festive season has ended. It’s a place of cupolas and belfries, of Renaissance and Baroque city squares, with sonorous church bells measuring out the onward march of time. It feels tailor-made for winter weekend breaks.

Almost entirely car-free, the old town sits on the west bank of the Salzach, backed by wooded hills and towered over by Hohensalzburg, the largest and best-preserved castle in central Europe. Visitors can reach it via funicular railway, then tour the medieval rooms of the powerful prince-archbishops who ran Salzburg as a wealthy independent city state until 1805, when it was subsumed into the Austrian empire.
austria  holiday  idea  christmas 
december 2017 by aries1988
Austria and Italy clash over South Tyrol citizenship proposal
Vienna proposes citizenship for residents of region formerly part of Austro-Hungarian empire
italia  austria  war  ww1  today 
december 2017 by aries1988
Four Lakes Bike Trip
June 4 my friend and I bike around the lake area in upper austria. We took adavantage of the group bike train ticket. Started from Attnang Pucheim, we had th...
biking  travel  lake  austria 
august 2015 by aries1988

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